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Full text of "Indiana County, Pennsylvania; her people, past and present, embracing a history of the county"

ML 



■liilii 



3 1833 01202 1827 



Gc 

974.801 
In2s 
V.2 

1129635 



reynolds historical 
oh:nealogy collection 



INDIANA COUNTY 

PENNSYLVANIA 

HER PEOPLE, PAST AND PRESENT 



Embracing a History of the County Compiled by 

PROF. J. T. STEWART 
And a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Representative Families 



IN TWO VOLUMES 

ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



CHICAGO 
J. H. BEERS & CO. 

1913 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



1129635 



PAGE 

Abel, William 1465 

Ackerson Families 1106, 1178 

Ackerson, James W 1220 

Ackerson, Dr. Lewis E 1178 

Ackerson, WUliam E 1106 

Adams, Alexander M 1339 

Adams, Mrs. Amanda 1423 

Adams Family 1339 

Adams, Lert 1297 

Adams, William W 1423 

Ake, Jacob G- 976 

Ake, James Dewier 976 

Albert, Leslie E 1430 

Alexander Family 813 

Alexander, Eay M., M. D 813 

Allison, Alexander H., M.D.. 851 

AlUson, Elmer W 818 

Allison Families 819, 851, 957 

Allison, Harry E 955 

Altemus Families 1117, 1336 

Altemns, Mrs. Jennie 1274 

Altemus, MatMas S 1338 

"Altemus, Newton G 1117 

Altemus, Mrs. Terzah P 1118 

Altemus, W. H 1274 

Altemus, William W 1337 

Altimus Family 780 

Altimus, Nicholas D 780 

Amend, Charles E 1122 

Amend Families 1036, 1122 

Amend, Frank C 1036 

Anderson Family 1395 

Andersen, John C 1395 

Ankeny, Edmund K 1199 

Ansley, Edward M 816 

Ansley Family 801, 816 

Ansley, Dr. William B 801 

Anthony Families 1058, 1307 

Anthony, John J 1307 

Anthony, Simen 1058 

Archibald Family 610 

Archibald, John P 610 

Armstrong, Andrew 1453 

Armstrong Family 1377 

Armstrong, Isaac N 1377 

Arnold Family 995 

Arnold, John N 995 

Askins Family 771 

Askins, Wesley 771 

Aul FamUy 1294 

Aul, Thomas H 1294 

Auld Family 1399 

Auld, John M 1399 

Badger, Ferguson W 1130 

Badger, William 1130 

Baker, Andrew P 707 

Baker Family 707 

Baker, George 1356 

Baker, Hezekiah W 1356 



PAGE 

Baker, Samuel F 1443 

Banks, John N 389, 605 

Barber, Ezekiel A 1505 

Barber Family 1505 

Barbour, Arthur L 1090 

Barbour, Augustus F 1090 

Barbour, William 1090 

Barclay, Alexander M 1396 

Barkley Family 1222 

Barkley, John M 1222 

Bamett Family 1344 

Barnett, Samuel 1344 

Baron, Eev. Anthony 986 

Bareon Family 1376 

Bareon, Harvey H 1376 

Barrett Families 1140 

Barrett, John D 1574 

Barrett, William E 1140 

Barron, Albert M 998 

Barron Family 998 

Bartholomew FamUy 1583 

Bartholomew, Jacob 1583 

Bash Family 1142 

Bash, William Dripps 1142 

Baughman Family 1335 

Baughman, Jonas B 1334 

Baun, David 1463 

Baun Family 1463 

Baun, Henry 1204 

Baun, Joseph G 1204 

Beam, John 1150 

Beatty Family 1077 

Beatty, James A 1077 

Beck, Elmer C 1586 

Beck Family 1586 

Bee, Daniel H 1246 

Bee Families 1246, 1448 

Bee, Jacob 1149 

Bee, John A 1149 

Bee, Leroy 1448 

Bell Families 867, 884 

Bell, .r. J 1091 

Bell, John T 393, 867 

Bell, Milton S 884 

Bence, Charles L 1206 

Bence Families 958, 1207 

Bence, George 1450 

Bence, Henry 1450 

Bence, John L 958 

Bennett, Abraham B 1521 

Bennett, Archie A 1526 

Bennett Families 

991, 1139, 1521, 1526, 1543 

Bennett, Harry W 1139 

Bennett, John 659 

Bennett, Norris W 1543 

Bennett, Peter 658 

Berkeypile, Hezekiah 1251 

Berkeypile, Steele 1252 

iii 



PAGE 

Best Family 1092 

Best, Martin W 1092 

Bier, John J 1319 

Billingslee Family 1065 

Billingslee, Thomas F 1065 

Bishop, John 1321 

Black, Adam 699 

Black Family 699 

Black, John 1159 

Black, Solomon 1159 

Blackburn, Enos E 1420 

Blair FamUy 679 

Blair, Hon. John P 388, 679 

Blakley Family 1566 

Blue, David 1593 

Blue, John , 1593 

Boden Family 918 

Boden, Todd E., M. D 918 

Beggs Family 1070 

Beggs, Harry Austin 1070 

Bolar Family 1250 

Belar, John A 1250 

Bestic, Edward K 1214 

Bostic, Jacob 1214 

Bothel, James 816 

Bothel, Nelson M 816 

Boucher FamUies. .805, 1035, 1205 

Boucher, Harry K 1205 

Boucher, John 1 1035 

Boucher, Joseph T 805 

Bovard Family 920 

Bevard, James C 920 

Bowers, Abraham 1401 

Bowers Family 1294 

Bowers, George W 1401 

Bowers, John S 1294 

Bowser, Anderson 876 

Bowser Family 1554 

Bowser, Dr. WiUiam E 876 

Bowser, Wilson M 1554 

Boyer Family 1097 

Beyer, Harrison B 1097 

Brandon Family 892 

Brandon, Thomas J 892 

Braughler Family 1285 

Braughler, George S 1285 

Brickell Family 1091 

Brickell, George A 1091 

Bricker, John G 1458 

Brieker, Philip 1458 

Brilhart Family 883 

Brilhart, William W 883 

Brinkman, WiUiam 1333 

Brody, Solomon 1199 

Brown, Chester A 1284 

Brown, Daniel 1078 

Brown FamUies 

1137, 1282, 1387, 1402 

Brown, Harry Y 1283 

Brown, Herbert M. 1402 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



PAGE 

Brown, Jacob 1137 

Brown, Michael E 1347 

BrowD, Samuel F 1387 

Brown, Thomas C 1348 

Brown, William J 1283 

Brownlee, Eev. J. Day. 319, 325, 625 

Bryan Family 893 

Bryan, John E 893 

Buchanan Families .. .645, 750, 794 

Buchanan, George T 750 

Buchanan, Harvey S 794 

Buchanan, William L 645 

Buchman, Eobert 1597 

Burgess, Joseph H 1072 

Burkett, Harry W 1501 

Burkett, Jacob 1501 

Burkett, J. & Son 1501 

-^^^Burkhart Family 829 

Burkhart, Jesse W 829 

Burns Family 1034 

Burns, Harry E 1133 

Bushnell, E. M., M. D 984 

Buterbaugh, Amariah N 1015 

Buterbaugh, Amos L 1433 

Buterbaugh Families 1015 

1295, 1302, 1369, 1400, 1433, 1557 

Buterbaugh, George M 1361 

Buterbaugh, George W 1400 

Buterbaugh, Harry E 1293 

Buterbaugh, Howard B., M. D.1557 

Buterbaugh, John 1492 

Buterbaugh, John H 1302 

Buterbaugh, Levi M 1487 

Buterbaugh, William H. (son 

of Levi M.) 1487 

Buterbaugh, William H 1369 

Butler Family 1172 

Butler, George W 1172 

Butler, John H 1207 

Butler, Eichard 1123 

Butler, Mrs. Sadie J 1124 

Butler, Samuel 1123 

Cable, Benjamin 1517 

Cable Family 1518 

Calclerwood, Andrew 1408 

Calderwood, Eobert 1450 

Calderwood, Samuel 1408 

Calderwood, Ward 1450 

Calhoun, Alexander P 1472 

Calhoun, Mrs. Annie E 1113 

Calhoun Families. .733, 1004, 1155 

Calhoun, Jefferson C 733 

Calhoun, William L 1155 

Calhoun, William E 1004 

Calhoun, William T 1444 

Cameron, Dr. Clark J 881 

Cameron Family 881 

Cameron, John G 954 

Camp Family 854 

Camp. Francis B 853 

Campbell, Adam 1131 

Campbell, A. W 905 

Campbell, Prof. Christopher 

A 943 

Campbell, Clement L 1177 

Campbell, Cornelius 643 

Campbell, Elsworth B 992 

Campbell Families 

897, 905, 968, 992 

1073, 1131, 1177, 1190, 1239, 1440 
Campbell, James 943 



PAGE 

Campbell, James S 1239 

Campbell, Joe J 1072 

Campbell, John 1055 

Campbell, John G., M.D 1073 

Campbell, Joseph L. 1190 

Campbell, Eobert S 1132 

Campbell, Thomas P 1440 

Campbell, William H 896 

Carnahan Families. . .684, 895, 920 

Carnahan, Israel 895 

Carnahan, Michael L 684 

Carnahan, William S 920 

Carney, Emerson E 1265 

Carney Family 1166 

Carney, MUton 1166 

Carr Family 1481 

Carr, John C 1481 

Carson Families 888, 1552 

Carson, Harry 1552 

Carson, John M 888 

Cessna Family 1528 

Cessna, George W 1120 

Cessna, Milton E 1528 

Cessna, Eichard C 1120 

Chapman FamOy 837 

Chapman, James 837 

Churchill Families 1288, 1544 

Churchill, Dr. Merton E 1.544 

Churchill, Philander 1288 

Clark, Armor P 888 

Clark Families 

.,676, 686, 787, 888, 1032, 1112 

Clark, Harry E 688 

Clark, John W 686 

aark, Joseph 688 

Clark, Samuel L 689 

Clark, Hon. Silas M., LL.D.388, 676 

Clark, Thomas B 1112 

Clawson, Benjamin 1188 

Clawson, Boyd J 1189 

Clawson PamOies 1188, 1459 

Clawson, Gere 1189 

Clawson, Thomas P 1459 

Cline Family 761 

Cline, Harry A 762 

Cline, John H 761 

Qowes, Austin W 859 

Clowes Family 859 

Coble, Epyrus 1286 

Coe, Benjamin F., M. D 637 

Coe Family 637 

Coleman, C. B. C 966 

Coleman, Eev. Elijah 1212 

Coleman Families . .966, 1017, 1212 

Coleman, Samuel C 1017 

Coleman, Wesley B 1212 

Compton, Edward C 1579 

Compton Family 1579 

Compton, Jackson A 1328 

Condron Family 1329 

Condron, James A 1329 

Conner Family 1033 

Conner, Jacob C 1033 

Conrad Family 1023 

Conrad, Franklin G 1023 

Conrath Families 1079, 1506 

Conrath, George A 1079 

Conrath, Eoy 1506 

Coon Family 1482 

Coon, Samuel G 1482 

Cooper, Erasmus E 1091 

Cooper, John F 1091 



PAGE 

Cooper, Naum 1486 

Coy Family 1072 

Cramer FamUies 660,' 1424 

Cramer, Joseph 660 

Cramer, Eobert G 661 

Cramer, Thomas W 661 

Cramer, William E 1424 

Cramer, WUson 660 

Cranraer, Carl B., M.D 1026 

Cranmer Family 1027 

Craven Family 986 

Craven, Mrs. Martha 986 

Craven, Thomas 986 

Crawford Families 

769, 901, 1087, 1293 

Crawford, Miss Mary B 770 

Crawford, Max 1293 

Crawford, Samuel 1086 

Crawford, WUliam B 901 

Crawford, William H 769 

Creamer Family 1226 

Creamer, Thompson 1226 

Creps, Elbie E 395, 836 

Creps Family 836 

Cribbs Family 830 

Cribbs, George W 830 

Cribbs, John 1394 

Cribbs, Joseph M 1394 

Croasmun, Everett L 1415 

Croasmun Families 1410, 1415 

Croasmun, Miles 1410 

Cronk, Charles 879 

Cronk, James 879 

Crossman, Asa 900 

Grossman, James A 900 

Crossman, Samuel A 1403 

Cumings Fanuly 1495 

Cumings, Miss Margaret B..149o 

Cummins, Andrew J 914 

Cummins Family 914 

Cunningham, Alphonse 1051 

Cunningham, David 1 627 

Cunningham Families 

627, 719. 996, 1051 

Cunningham, Eobert H 996 

Cunningham, S. Eoy 997 

Cunningham, Thomas D 719 

Curfman, George H 872 

Daugherty Family 829 

Daughertv, John W, 1425 

Daugherty, WiUiam S 829 

Davis, Alvin 1 1238 

Davis, Cameron 1504 

Davis, David W 1281 

Davis, Evan G 1340 

Davis Families . . . .681, 1238, 1281 

1340, 1348, 1428, 1504, 1539 

Davis, John L 1539 

Davis, Price 1428 

Davis, William H 1348 

Davis, Wilson C 681 

Davison Family 814 

Davison. James C 814 

Deabenderfer, John 1441 

Deabenderf er, Lewis 1441 

Decker, Christopher 1348 

Decker, Peter E 1348 

DeLancey Family 808 

DeLancey, Jacob 808 

DeVinney Family 945 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



PAGE 

DeViimey, James D 945 

DeVinney, George C 947 

Devlin Family 1227 

Devlin, WiUiam 1227 

Dick, David H 1028 

Dick, Dinsmore 1011 

Dick Families 1011, 1028, 1549 

Dick, George H 1549 

Dick, Jacob M 1123 

Dick, Jacob P 1123 

Dick, Martin H 1424 

Dickie Families. . .632, 1125, 1564 

Dickie, George C 632 

Dickie, Joseph Dixon 1125 

Dickie, William H 1564 

DUl, Benson S 692 

Dill Family 689 

Dill, Harry E 692 

Dilts Family 1590 

Dilts, Eobert H 1590 

Dinger, Elmer E 1585 

Dinger Family 1585 

Dixon FamUy 809, 1262 

Dixon, James 809 

Donahey, Benjamin F 1417 

Donahey Families. .859, 1293, 1417 

Donahey, James H 1292 

Donahey, Theodore M 859 

Dormire Family 1324 

Pormire, Jacob 1324 

Dorn Family 1150 

Dorn, John 1150 

Doty Families 652, 951, 1240 

Doty, GUlis M 951 

Doty, John 1240 

Douds, David W 609 

Douds Family 607 

Douds, James B 608 

Douds, Samuel W 607 

Dougherty Family 1451 

Dougherty, Joseph 1451 

Douglas, James C 1272 

Douglass Families. .896, 1270, 1578 

Douglass, John E 1270 

Douglass, Johnathan 1578 

Douglass, Samuel A 387, 896 

Dowler Family 864 

Dewier, Harry P 864 

Dreese (Treese) Family 1499 

Dugan, Thomas 627 

Duncan, Andrew 1481 

Duncan, Archie W 1464 

Duncan Families 

....629, 1355, 1464, 1481, 1535 

Duncan, Thomas B 1535 

Duncan, "William 1355 

Dunlap, Clark 1194 

Dunlap Family 1194 

Dunlap, Thomas 1102 

Dunsmore, William D 741 

Dwyer, Edward 650 

Earhart, Dr. E. Bruce 634 

Earhart Family 635 

Edmunds, Edward 1320 

Elbel, Charles E 1418 

Elbel, Charles W 1418 

Elbel Family 1141 

Elbel, George H 1141 

Elder, Aaron W 917 

Elder Families 917, 960 

Elder, Eobert Y 960 



PAGE 

Elkin Families 593, 766, 838 

Elkin, Francis 594 

Elkin, Hon. John P 392, 590 

Elkin, WiUiam F 394, 766 

EUiott Family 1118 

EUiott, Harry M 1118 

Emerick Families 1075, 1483 

Emerick, Harvey G 1075 

Emerick, Eobert L 1483 

Empfield, Edward 1421 

Empfield Families 1248, 1421 

Empfield, William H 1248 

English, Hugh Craig 799 

Evans, Benjamin F 913 

Evans Families 

773, 878, 913, 1053, 1252 

Evans, John S 878 

Evans, Josiah G 1252 

Evans, Samuel W 1053 

Evans, Mrs. Sarah 1054 

Evans, William A., M. D 644 

Evans, William A 772 

Everhart Family 1002 

Everwine, Jacob 1550 

Everwine, Jacob J 1550 

Ewing, Alexander 663 

Ewing Family 1413 

Ewing, Eobert A 1413 

Ewing, Eev. William D 



Fair Families 


.882, 1164 


Fair, James 


600 


Fair, E. Willis, M. S., Ph. D. 600 


Fair, WUliam M 


882 


Faloon, Alexander .... 


1360 


Faloon Family 


1360 


Farabaugh, Charles G. 


1396 


Farnsworth Family . . . 


1228 


Farnsworth, John 


1228 


Farri, Eev. Emilio . . . 


1331 


Fassett, Emory 


1589 


Fassett, Leonard K... 


1589 


Fee Family 


923 


Fee, Harry W 


..394, 923 


Fennell Family 


1036 


FenneU, Harvey H... 


1589 


Fennell, John A 


1036 


Fenton Family 


1485 


Fenton, William H 


1485 


Ferguson, Charles D . . 


904 


Ferguson Families . . . 


.904, 1581 


Ferguson, W. Sherman 


1581 


Ferrier, Andrew C 


1215 


Ferrier Family 


1215 


Fetterhoff FamUy 


1420 


Fetterhoff, John W 


1420 


Findley Families 


.775,1005 


Findley, James G 


1005 


Findley, William H... 


775 


Fiseus, Alexander 


1221 


Fiseus, Mrs. Mary E. . 


1221 


Fisher, Alva C 


1018 


Fisher F'amilies.638, 812, 


1018,1218 


Fisher, Henry A 


1218 


Fisher, James G., M. D 


812 


Fisher, Hon. John S. . . 


..393, 638 


Fleck, Mrs. E. M 


824 


Fleck Family 


824 


Fleck, Henry M 


824 


Fleeger, Albert P 


1389 


Fleming, David A 


1508 



PAGE 

Fleming Families 

993, 1335, 1508 

Fleming, Francis J 1407 

Fleming, George H 1407 

Fleming, James G 993 

Fleming, Eobert F 993 

Fleming, Eoss S 1335 

Fleming, Thomas H 693 

Flickinger FamUy 807 

Flickinger, Harry 490, 807 

Foose, JoTm 1469 

Foster, Andrew 1406 

Fouts Family 1544 

Fonts, Taylor W 1544 

Frantz Family 1U81 

Frantz, Jacob 1082 

Frantz, James D 1084 

Frantz, Thomas H 1083 

Frasher, Elmer F., M. D 926 

Frasher Family 926 

Freeh FamUy 811 

Freeh, Peter 811 

Fry Families 1276, 1589 

Fry, Kinter 1276 

Fry, Oliver C 1589 

Fulton, Clyde E 1490 

Fyock Families 857 

Pyock, Eev. John W 857 

Fyock, Samuel L 1366 

GaUey FamUy 952 

Galley, Samuel 952 

Gallagher, Jacob A 1315 

Gallaher Family 1476 

Gallaher, Dr. John W 1476 

Gamble FamUy 908 

Gamble, George F 908 

Gardner, Charles H., M. D. . . 798 
Gardner FamUies. .797, 1133, 1532 

Gardner, James 797 

Gardner, John B 1133 

Gardner, William S 1532 

Gates FamUv 889 

Gates, WiUiam D., M. D 889 

George Families 

825, 835, 1225, 1462 

George, John P 1225 

George, Joseph W 1461 

George, Walter B 825 

George, WUUam H 835 

Gerhard, Jacob F 1185 

Gessler, Charles U 1122 

Gessler, Mrs. Hannah 1122 

Getty FamUy 989 

Getty, James S 989 

Getty, Samuel J 1243 

Gibson, Mrs. Elizabeth 739 

Gibson FamUies 770, 1358 

Gibson, Ira E 770 

Gibson, Irving W 1358 

Gibson, James 1060 

Gibson, Samuel S 739 

GUbert, Luman 1181 

Gilbert Family 1181 

GiU, John E 1323 

GiUespie, Amos E 922 

Gillespie Family 1274 

Glass FamUy 1084 

Glass, Thomas Burns 1034 

Glass, William A 1084 

Glasser Family 1542 

Glasser, John F 1542 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



PAGE 

Glenn, Daniel 1121 

Glenn, Joseph 1121 

Glenn, Joseph J 1480 

Glenn, WilUam A 1480 

Golden Family 1560 

Golden, Mabry J 1560 

Gordon Family 1313 

Gorman, Clinton D 791 

Gorman Families 791, 1468 

Gorman, John W 1468 

Gourley Family 693 

Gourley, John C, M. D 693 

Graff Family 711 

Graff, George W 1429 

Graff, Henry 711 

Graff, James G 713 

Graff, Sumner 713 

Graham, Allen S 1289 

Graham Families 

694, 1289, 1529, 1523 

Graham, James 694 

Graham, James B 1523 

Graham, William J 1529 

Gray, Alexander 1392 

Green, Elisha 899 

Green Family 899 

Green, James B 899 

Greiner, George W 1447 

Greiner, John A 1157 

Greiner, William 1157 

Griffith, A. B 1457 

Griffith, Charles 1357 

Griffith, Charles E 713 

Griffith, Evan W 1555 

Griffith Families 713 

866, 1039, 1191, 1354, 1357, 1457 

Griffith, George S 866 

Griffith, Henry S 1354 

Griffith, Stephen B 1039 

Griffith, Thomas 1555 

Griffith, William 1191 

Grubbs Familv 1563 

Grubbs. John M., M. D 1563 

Grumbling Family 1060 

Grumbling, Hudson E 1060 

Hadden Family 1456 

Hadden, James W 1456 

Hahn, Mrs. Annie 1006 

Hahn, Louis J 1006 

Hall, Willis D., M. D 1579 

Hamilton, Aubrey M 1224 

HamOton Families 

806, 826, 1099, 1265, 1412 

Hamilton, Stewart S 1412 

Hamilton, William A 1099 

Hamilton, William S 806 

Hamilton, William W 1224 

Hanna Family 1592 

Hanna, James A 1591 

Harbison, Alexander M 1046 

Harbison, Mrs. Elizabeth 864 

Harbison Families. 863, 1030, 1046 

Harbison, John 863 

Harbison, Joseph W 1030 

Harbison, Miss Martha J 864 

Harbison, William W 1048 

Harmon, Clair G., M. D 1172 

Hart Familv 1375 

Hart, Harry H 1375 

Hart, Mrs. John A 1039 

Harvey Family 752 



PAGE 

Harvey, Nathan C 752 

Hastings, Carl M 629 

Hastings Families 629, 1208 

Hastings, Eeuben 1208 

Hawes, Boyd W 875 

Hawes Family 875 

Hay Family 721 

Hay, Eev. Lewis, D. D 301, 721 

Hazlett Families 1516, 1517 

Hazlett, George W 1517 

Hazlett, James M 1516 

Hazlett, Samuel C 1264 

Hedden, Manlev J 1500 

Heffliek, David 1468 

Hefflick, John 1467 

Heilman, Elmer E.. M. D 1001 

Henderson, Mrs. Elizabeth C. 885 
Henderson Families 

617, 885, 965 

Henderson, John W 885 

Henderson, Joseph A 965 

Henderson, Samuel C 1457 

Henry. Daniel B . . .' 1460 

Henry Families 657, 934, 1460 

Henry, Hon. James T 657 

Henry, Matthew H 934 

Herbison Family 1135 

Hess, Albert H 1095 

Hess Family 1095 

Hess. George 1053 

Hess, George F 1404 

Hewitt. Irvin A 729 

Hicks, Abram 1135 

Hicks Families 1135, 1441 

Hicks. Lawrence 1441 

Hildebrand Family 1001 

Hildebrand. Thomas E 1001 

Hileman. Charles E 1210 

Hileman Families 1055, 1211 

Hileman, James M 1055 

Hill Families 810, 873 

Hill, Eev. George, D. D..236, 810 

Hill. William B 873 

Hines, Albert J 1430 

Hines, Celestian 1416 

Hines Familv 1436 

Hines. Joseph 1390 

Hines, Eov J 1390 

Hoffman, Henry 1025 

Hoffman. Milton 1352 

Hollis Family 735 

Hollis, McCiellau 735 

Hollsaple, Joseph 1123 

Hood Family 648 

Hood, James 648 

Hood, Eobert J 649 

Hoover, A. Clifford 963 

Hoover Family 963 

Hoover, Fred 1377 

Hoover, George W 1066 

Hoover, John T 1066 

Hopkins Family 938 

Hopkins. William W 938 

Horton Family 666 

Hotham, Brentwood H. De 

Vere. M. D 1301 

Houck Families 1041, 1155 

Houck, George F 957 

Houck, Henry 1016 

Houck, J. Ward 1041 

Housholder, John E 1556 

Housholder, Solomon 1556 



PAGE 

Houston Family 959 

Houston, William 959 

Howard, Daniel 753 

Howard FamUy 753 

Hughes Family : . . . 1551 

Hughes, Thomas A 1551 

Hunter, Alexander 1583 

Hunter Families 856, 1454 

Hunter, George, M. D 856 

Hunter, Kinlev 1453 

Hutchison Family 1176 

Hutchison, James J 1176 

Imbrie Family 828 

Imbrie, Eev. James M 828 

Irwin, Samuel „ . 1116 

Irwin, WilUam W 1116 

Jack Families 606. 1002 

Jack, Hon. Summers M..391. 606 

Jack, William B 1004 

Jackson, Walter H 927 

Jacoby, John 1470 

Jacoby, William 1471 

Jamieson, Eev. John 329, 931 

Jamison, William 1144 

Jeffries Familv 743 

Jeffries, George H 743 

Johns, William, M. D 1093 

Johns. Wilson P 1093 

Johnston, Dr. Alexander.... 647 

Johnston, Alexander E 647 

Johnston Family 903 

Johnston, J. Milton 903 

Johnston, Stephen A 646 

Joiner. George M 1101 

Jones Family 922 

Jones, John "E 1401 

Jordan Family 1109 

Jordan, Joseph A 1109 

Jordan, Eobert 1109 

Kametz, Andrew 1488 

Kanarr Family 1257, 1290 

Kanarr. Jacob 1214 

Kanarr, Moses 1290 

Kanarr, Simon T 1257 

Kauffman Family 1166 

Kauffman, James S 1166 

Kaufman, Michael 1479 

Kaufman, Samuel 1479 

Keagle, George S 1475 

Keeley. James M 937 

Keelv, Daniel 936 

Keelv Family 936 

Keib'ler, E. j. (John E.)....1525 

Keibler Family 1525 

Keith Families 1413, 1545 

Keith, George 1545 

Keith, Jeremiah 1413 

Kelly Families 1305, 1596 

Kellv, George W 1305 

Kelly, Henry C 1596 

Kennedy Family 1114 

KennedV, Sylvester C 1114 

Kerr, Albert C 1594 

Kerr Families 

1202, 1426, 1542, 1594 

Kerr, John W 1426 

Kerr, Mrs. Mary 1594 

Kerr, Thomas 962 

Kerr, Thomas C 1201 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



Kerr, William 1542 

Killin,, Capt. Daniel 1044 

Killin Family 1044 

Killin, Mrs. Nancy T 1045 

Kimple, Capt. William 1284 

King Families 1156, 1570 

King, Isaac Norman 1156 

King, Samuel T 1381 

King, William J 1570 

Kingston, Isadore 1488 

Kinnan Family 1111 

Kinnan, Jolm T 1111 

Kiuter, Mrs. Elisabeth 1199 

Kinter Families 

630, 742, 974, 1105, 1198 

Kinter, Herbert P 742 

Kinter, Capt. John 974 

Kinter, Capt. John A 631 

Kinter, Peter W 1198 

Kinter, P. Watson 975 

Kinter, Mrs. Sophia A 1106 

Kinter, William H 1105 

Kirkwood, James S 1249 

Kish, Frank 1385 

Kissinger Family 1502 

Kissinger, William 1502 

Kleinstub, Herman 1317 

Kline Family 847 

Kline, George K 847 

Klingensmith Family 1438 

Klingensmith, Matthias T 1438 

Knauf, Henry W 1025 

Knox Family 1233 

Koontz Family 1497 

Koontz, Homer W 1497 

Krider Family 973 

Krider, Samuel A 973 

Kunkle, Calvin S 1119 

Kunkle Family 1119 

Kunkle, John C 1262 

Kunkle, Lowry G 1244 

Kunkle, Mrs. Sarah E 1262 

Laflferty, John P 987 

Laney, John 1278 

Lang, Aaron W 1291 

Langham Families ....654, 1243 

Langham, Harvey B 1248 

Langham, Jonathan N 393, 654 

Langham, Sharp S 1243 

Lariff, Harry 1489 

Laughry Family 1009 

Laughry, Johnson L 1009 

Lawrence Family 1376 

Lawi-ence, William S 1376 

Leard Family 822 

Leard, Zachariah 823 

Learn Families 1080, 1491 

Leard, Frank H 1080 

Learn, Oakley E 1491 

Leasure, David C 1209 

Leasure,. Mrs. Evaline 1209 

Leasure Families 702, 

• •. 1215, 1216, 1533 

Leasure, John C •. 702 

Leasure, John W 1533 

Leasure, Sainuel B 1216 

Leib, Paul 1499 

Lemke, Charles 1372 

Lemke, Lewis W 1373 

Lemmon Families 1124, 1269 

Lemon Family 1359 

Lemon, John"G 1359 



Leonard, Miss Jane E. . . .227 

Lettie Family 

LeVine, Sol 

Levinson, Harry 

Lewis, Enoch F 

Lewis, Estell B., M. D 

Lewis, Capt. Even 

Lewis Families 1012, 

.. .1237, 1266, 1322, 1536, 

Lewis, Hugh P 

Lewis, John 

Lewis, Samuel 

Lewis, Thomas S 

Liggett Families 944, 

Liggett, J. Nelson 

Liggett, WUliam N 394 

Lightcap, Mrs. Elizabeth S. . 

Lightcap Families 1134, 

Lightcap, J. Scott 

Lightcap, Sam uel 

Lightner, Joseph F 

Limrick, Andrew J 

Ling, Benjamin F 

Ling Family 

Lingle, Chester M 

Lingle Family 

Lintner, D. Elliott 

Lintner Families 1127, 

Lintner, Joseph P 

Lintner, Miss Mary I 

Lintner, William 

Liptak, George 

Little Family 

Litt,le, William S 

Lloyd Family 

Lockard, Elsworth M 

Lockard Family 

Long, Archibald A 

Long Families 

685, 1313, 1505, 

Long, Henry H 

Long, Jesse M 

Long, Jesse E 

Long, Thomas H 

Long, William T 

Longwill Families ....1216, 

Longwill, J. Clair 

Longwill, John S 

Lore, James 

Lore, John H 

Lose, James E 

Lose Family 

Loughry Family 

Loughry, Joseph H 

Loughry, Mrs. Martha B . . . , 

Loughry, Miss Mary E 

Loughry, James A 

Loughry, Samuel L 

Loughry, W. E , 

Lower Family 

Lower, William H 

Lo'mnan, George 

Lowman Families 1472, 

Lowman, Hugh 

Lowry Family 

Lowry, Horace M 

Lucas Families 12S7, 

Lucas, Samuel S 

Lucas, Thomas 

Lukehart Family 

Lukehart, Wallace E 

Lukehart, William L 



PAGE 

, 853 
1029 
1488 
1596 
1104 
1556 
1266 
1104 
1556 
1012 
1322 
1237 
1536 
1356 
1356 
, 944 
1134 
1510 
1510 
1134 
1447 
1411 
1157 
1157 

680 

680 
1128 
1341 
1341 
1128 
1127 
1503 
1235 
1235 
1051 



1514 
1313 
1164 
1164 
685 
1514 
1439 
1439 
1216 
1470 
1470 
1189 
1189 
1347 
1347 
1347 
597 
598 
598 
604 
1592 
1592 
1519 
1519 
1472 
663 
663 
1306 
1287 
1306 
1532 
1533 
1532 



PAGE 

Lute, Frederick 1471 

Lute, Harvey S 1471 

Lydic, Chapman 1450 

Lydic, Elmer 1498 

Lydic Family 1444 

Lydic, WUliam H 1444 

Lydick, Azariah J 1277 

Lydick, Elliott M 1382 

Lydick Families 

871, 890, 1277, 1382, 1427 

Lydick, Harry E 890 

Lydick, John P 1427 

Lydick, Joseph 871 

Lynn Family 1558 

Lynn, Thomas S 1558 

Lyons Family 958 

Lytle Famines 998, 1455 

Lytle, John H 1455 

Lytle, Eobert 1056 

Lytle, William B 998 

MeAfoos, Benjamin M 1021 

McAfoos, George F 1021 

McAfoos, Mrs. Mary E 1021 

McAnulty, Asa E 1552 

McAnulty Family 1552 

McCartney Families 664, 1223 

McChesney, Eobert, M. D 697 

McChesney, William A., M. D. 

374, 697 

McClaran Family 873 

McClaran, Joseph A 872 

McClaran, Hon. William 1001 

MeComb Families 663, 1038 

McComb, Gen. James 662 

McComb, John 1039 

McCormick Family 848 

McCormick, John B 542, 848 

McCormick, John B., Home of 848 
McCormick, John B., in his 

Workshop 848 

McCormick, Mrs. S. J 1393 

McCormick, Winfield S 1393 

McCoy, Columbus 874 

MeCov Families 874, 1442 

McCoy, Samuel A 1442 

McCracken Family 804 

McCraeken, Joseph J 804 

MrCrea, Dr. Chalmers S 717 

McCrea Family 1088 

McCrea, Gilbert T 716 

McCrea, Eobert E 717 

McCrea, Thompson C 1088 

McCrea, WiUiam P 1090 

McCreary Family 718 

McCreary, Harry 718 

McCreery FamUy 1584 

McCreery, John G 1584 

McCrory Family 832 

McCrory, John G 832 

McCuUough, Andrew W 886 

McCullough Families 

886, 975, 1305 

McCullough, George W 1305 

McCullough, Harmon L., M. D. 975 

MeCune, George J 1462 

McDonnell Family 1100 

McDonnell, Simon 1100 

McElhoes Family 870 

McElhoes, James S 870 

McFarland, Clifford 1135 

McFarland Families 

676, 1135, 1.561 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



PAGE 

MeFarland, Maj. Irvin 604 

McFarland, John E 1561 

MeFarland, William 1135 

MeFeaters, Charles A 1365 

McFeaters Families 1334, 1365 

MeFeaters, John M 1334 

McFeatters, Miss Clara E 1573 

MeFeatters, James S 1572 

MeFeatters, John A 1572 

MeGaughey, Mrs. Elizabeth J. 1437 

McGaughey Family 1437 

MeGaughey, Joseph 1437 

McGee Family 588 

MeGee, John 588 

MeGee, Mrs. Sarah H 589 

McGovern, Peter J 715 

McGregor Families 698, 941 

McGregor, James C 697 

McGregor, William H 941 

McGuire, John H 1171 

McGuire FamUy 962, 1171 

McGuire, Levi 962 

McHenry, Mrs. Clara 1026 

McHenry, E. Quay, M. D 723 

McHenry Fanfilies 

723, 880, 1438, 1519, 1587 

McHenry, John 1026 

McHenry, Ealph F., M. D 880 

McHenry, Samuel E 1519 

McHenry, Smith M 1026 

McHenry, U. S. Grant 1587 

McHenry, William Simpson. .1438 

McHenry, William 1511 

Mclsaae Family 855 

Mclsaac, Hugh A 855 

McKalip Family 1059 

McKalip, James D 1059 

McKee Family 1273 

McKee, James A 1273 

McKendriek, Mrs. Emma 1372 

McKendrick Families ..1019, 1371 

McKendriek, James 1019 

McKendriek, John 1371 

McKiDip, Miss Anna J 1132 

McKillip Families 1132, 1537 

McKillip, HamUton 1132 

McKillip, Mrs. Martha . 1538 

McKUlip, WilUam W 1537 

McKnight, Col. Amor A 930 

MeKnight Family 930 

McKnight, James A 613 

McKnight, Miss Mary C 613 

McKnight, Hon. William J., 

M. D 928 

McLain, Capt. Charles 763 

McLain Families 701, 763 

McLain, Capt. Gawin A 701 

McLaughlin Family 898 

McLaughlin, Gillis L 899 

McLaughlin, John 898 

McMillen, Simon 1144 

McMillen, Sylvester 1547 

McMillen, W"illiam 1144 

McNeils, Eev. NeU P 282, 1036 

McNutt, Alvin T 865 

McNutt Family 865 

McQuilkin, Archie S 1148 

McQuilkin Family 1148 

McQuilkin, William H 827 

MeQuown FamUy 968 

McQuown, James A 968 

Mabon, Archie W 633 



PAGE 

Mabon Families 633, 755, 1328 

Mabon, Isaac H 755 

Mack, David W 741 

Maek Families 635, 

740, 778, 1006, 1098, 1169, 1569 

Maek, George F 741 

Mack, Hugh St. Qair 1570 

Maek, Jacob W 1569 

Mack, James W 1098 

Mack, Eobert G 635 

Mack, Eobert H 778 

Maek, Sylvester S 1008 

Mack, Thomas C 1006 

Mack, William C 1169 

Maguire Family 837 

Maguire, Eev. Harry W. .311, 837 

Mahan Family 948 

Mahan, Harry E 948 

Mahan, James C 949 

Mahan, William H 948 

Mallory, Eev. Dr. Ira 797 

Mankovich, Eev. Paul 1249 

Manner, Elmer 1378 

Manner Family 1378 

Marasco, Anthony 1388 

Marasco, Joseph 1388 

Mardis, Jliss Agnes 731 

Mardis, Dr. Benjamin F 730 

Mardis Family 729 

Mardis, Samuel J 730 

Mardis, Samuel L 730 

Marshall, Alvertus P 1259 

Marshall, Clark G 977 

Marshall Families . .789, 977, 1259 

Marshall, James F 1261 

Marshall, Godfrey 1048 

Marshall, Eobert J., M. D. . 

373, 789 

Marshall, Thomas D 791 

Martin Family 1163 

Martin, John D 1514 

Martin, Mrs. Maria 1514 

Martin, William H 1163 

Mathews Family 817 

Mathews, George H 818 

Mayer, Mrs. Olive F 676 

Meade, Charles 1165 

Meaner Family 1388 

Meanor, William P 1388 

Meekins, Thomas 1540 

Meekins, William H 1540 

Metz, Michael 1104 

Miiesell Families. 1071, 1168, 1202 

Mikesell, John K 1071 

Mikesell, John P 1168 

Mikesell, Eobert E 1202 

Mikesell, Mrs. SalUe E 1168 

Millen, Eobert H 1113 

Millen, Thomas H 1458 

Millen, William A 1113 

MHler, Amos S 1411 

Miller, Edward A 1161 

MiUer Families 

994, 1027, 1042, 1095, 1161, 1182 
1230, 1286, 1344, 1351, 1548 

MiUer, Herman H 1027 

Miller, Isaac K 1095 

Miller, Jacob W 1182 

Miller, Milton G 994 

Miller, Moses B 1548 



PAGE 

Miller, Eev. Noble G 1351 

Miller, Robert N 1344 

MiUer, Samuel M 104? 

Miller, William S 1230 

Micser Family 1417' 

Minser, George A 1417 ■ 

Minser, Samuel L 1255 

Mitchell FamUies ..653, 785, 1065 

Mitchell, James 653' 

Mitchell, Miss Flora Jane. . . . 789 
Mitchell, Dr. Eobert. .496, 653, 785 

Mitchell, Eobert 789- 

Mock Family 1541 

Mock, Harry C 1541 

Mock, Jesse E 1429- 

Mock, Joseph M 1130 

Mock, William H 1429' 

Moore, Charles H 1165 

Moore Families 1165, 1538 

Moore, Frank Fisher, M. D. . . 1167 

Moore, Henry W 1538 

Moore, James C 642 

Moore, William 642' 

Moorhead, Alexander T 757 

Moorhead Families 841, 1302 

Moorhead, Frank 1302 

Moorhead, Joseph 841 

Moorhead, Mrs. Mary A 1245 

Moorhead, Samuel N 1245 

Moreau, Albert F 1125 

Moreau Family 1125 

Morrow Family 1056 

Morrow, John E 1560 

Morrow, John W., M. D. .373, 1056 

Mulberger Family 1102 

Mulberger, Samuel J 1102 

Mumau Family 1435 

Mumau, Samuel E 1435 

Munshower Families . . 1300, 1432 

Munshower, Samuel 1432 

Munshower, William H 1300 

Myers Families ..1280, 1387, 1582 

Myers, Ira A 1280 

Myers, Ira C 1387 

Myers, Jacob W 1582 

Neal Families 

771, 849, 1061, 1115, 1400, 1545 

Neal, Harry B., M. D 771 

Neal, Hugh K 1115 

Neal, John 1538 

Neal, John L 1061 

Neal, Josiah 1400 

Neal, Sharp, Sr 1545 

Neal, Thomas S 849 

Nealer, Henry 887 

Nealer, John 1161 

Nealer, John, Deceased 1162 

Neeley Family '. 1563 

Neeley, Hon. William F 1563 

Nelson Family 916 

Nelson, Ulysses G 916 

Nesbitt Families 1068, 1183 

Nesbitt, Samuel M 1183 

New Family 683 

New, George J 685 

Nichol, Charles A 735 

Nichol Families 

735, 1318, 1430, 1492 

Nichol, James 1430 

Nichol, Wesley W 1318 

Nichol, * William A 1492 

Niel, David T 668 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



PAGE 

Kiel FamUy 668 

Niel, James 1398 

Niel, John J 1398 

Nippes, Chester W. C 1299 

Nippes Family 1299 

Nippes, J. C 1299 

Nisewonger, Andrew 1278 

Nisewonger Family 1278 

Nixon, Edward 978 

Nixon, Miss Fanny W 979 

Noerr, George 1527 

Nogel, John 1104 

Nogel, Mrs. Margaret 1104 

North Family 1448 

North, Nathaniel S 1448 

Norton, Eoscoe E., M. D 1397 

Notley, Delmont E 922 

Notley Family 922 

Nowry, James 1 1275 

Nowry, Samuel H 995 

Nupp, Cyrus 1374 

Nupp Families 1370, 1374 

Nupp, John M 1370 

Oakes, Clifford J 1354 

Oakes FamUies 984, 1354 

Oakes, TVilliam E 984 

Oatman Family 746 

Oatman, Franklin P 746 

Oatman, Mrs. S. E 748 

Ober, David 1466 

Ober, Lewis W 1432 

Ober Family 1053 

Ober, Joseph 1466 

Ober, William S 1431 

Oberlin, Curtis A 844 

Oberlin FamUy 842 

Oberlin, Harry W 843 

Oberlin, William P 842 

Ogden, George D 625 

Ogden, Capt. George H 624 

Ogden, Joseph C 625 

Ogden, Mrs. Nancy H 625 

Oliver Family 924 

Oliver, John S 924 

O 'Neill, Clarence B 742 

O'Neill, Edward 753 

O'Neill Families 742, 753 

Orner, Daniel J 1107 

Orner Family 1107 

Orr Family 670 

Orr, James L 670 

Ortner, John A 1298 

Ortner, John S 1298 

Osmun, Earl C 1500 

Palmer, Alvin K 1581 

Palmer, Anthony A 926 

Palmer, Davis A 1016 

Palmer Families 

1016, 1203, 1342, 1581 

Palmer, Joseph 1253 

Palmer, Mrs. Martha M 1253 

Palmer, Miss Mary E 926 

Palmer, Michael H 1203 

Palmer, Samuel 926 

Palmer, Samuel M 1342 

Park Families 758, 939 

Park, John T 939 

Park, Dr. Leon N 758 

Pamell, Joseph E 954 

Parry, Henry 1380 



PAGE 

Parry, Judson 1380 

Patterson, D. Donald 1145 

Patterson, Harry C. W 802 

Patterson Families. 802, 1145, 1549 

Patterson, John W 1549 

Pattison Family 1467 

Pattison, Orrin J 805 

Pattison, Eobert 1467 

Pauch, Charles F 1491 

Paul Family 1409 

Paul, William H 1409 

Paytash, Peter 1437 

Pearce, Charles H 1523 

Pearee Families 1454, 1523 

Pearce, James A 1454 

Peddieord, Clark D 1221 

Peddicord, J. Wilson 1366 

Peffer Family 1478 

Peffer, Micheal 1478 

Peterman Family 1040 

Peterman, James H., M. D . . 1040 

Petraitis, Frank 1496 

Pettigrew, Samuel 1391 

Pettigrew, Mrs. Sarah A 1391 

Pettigrew, Thomas S 1391 

Pfordt, Charles C 1513 

Phythyan, Frank 1435 

Pierce Families 765, 1138 

Pierce, John H 765 

Pierce, Peter C 1138 

Pittman Family 1494 

Pittman, Leonard D 1494 

Plotzer^ Family 1479 

Plotzer, George W 1479 

Plowman, Solomon E 1367 

Postlewait Family 1129 

Postlewait, J. Scott 1129 

Postlewait, Joseph W 1129 

Pounds Family 1567 

Pounds. John F 1567 

Pratt Familv 596 

Price, David J 1419 

Pringle, David E 1474 

Pringle Family 1474 

Prothero Family 1200 

Prothero, Henry 1200 

Eamsay, Morris 1110 

Eamsay, William 1110 

Eank Family 1032 

Bank, Samuel K 1032 

Eankin, Charles M 1343 

Eankin, David A 1373 

Eankin Families 

887, 1343, 1373, 1539 

Eankin, James B 1098 

Eankin, Joseph W 886 

Eankin, Matthew T 1097 

Eankin, William 1539 

Earaigh, David W 839 

Earaigh Family 840 

Eay Family 682 

Eay, Hugh D 1454 

Eay, Miss Margaret J 1024 

Eay, Eobert N 682 

Eay, Samuel 1024 

Eay, William 1454 

Eeed, Earl D 1498 

Eeese, George J., M. D. . .372, 665 
Eeisinger or Eisinger Family 639 

E^zzolla, John 1500 

Ehea, Clarence B 1303 



PAGE 

Ehea Family 1303 

Ehoads Family 685 

Ehoads, Harry P 685 

Ehoads, Spencer H 1035 

Ehoads, William 1109 

Eice Family 1469 

Eice, WiUiam B 1469 

Eiehards Family 919 

Eichards, John J 919 

Eiehards, John E 919 

Eichey Family 1391 

Eichey, William C 1391 

Eiddell, Arthur M 644 

Eiddle Family 983 

Eiddle, Peter 983 

Einn, Daniel F 1008 

Einn Family 1008 

Eishel, Henry 1232 

Eisinger, Daniel E 1057 

Eisinger Families. .639, 1049, 1057 

Eisinger, James M 641 

Eisinger, Michael H 1049 

Eisinger, William P 641 

Eobinson, A. J. Weir 970 

Eobinson Families 

613, 744, 970, 1045, 1146 

Eobinson, John W 613 

Eobinson, Samuel J 1045 

Eobinson, William E 744 

Eobinson, William G 1146 

Eochester Family 774 

Eochester, John H 774 

Eodkey, George 1577 

Eodkey, John H 1577 

Eolley, Eobert 1593 

Eomance, Wasil 1593 

Eoney Family 861 

Eoney, Henry E 861 

Eoof, George W 1254 

Eoof, John H 1254 

Eose Family 1067 

Eose, John" Calvin 1067 

Eose, Samuel W 1192 

Eoser, Dennis 1077 

Eoser Families 1077, 1316 

Eoser, Fry 1316 

Eoss Families 988, 1317 

Eoss, Harry T 1317 

Eoss, John Smith 988 

Eowe, Mrs. Catherine 1297 

Eowe, Daniel 1298 

Eowe Families... 1069, 1363, 1425 

Eowe, George F 1425 

Eowe, George L 1363 

Eowe, Samuel L 1069 

Eowland, Eev. Elias 298, 845 

Eowland Family 844 

Eowland, John D 1383 

Eowland, Eev. Martin L 

293-4, 846 

Eowland, William S 846 

Eowley, Josiah 1548 

Eowley, William W 1549 

Euffner, Dr. Harry E 1573 

Euffner, Joseph E 1573 

Eugh Family 965 

Eugh, Samuel Truby 965 

Eunyan, Eev. Andrew B 1187 

Eunzo, Frank 1596 

Eupert Family 1461 

Eupert, Hezekiah 1461 

Eupp, H. Eussell 1384 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 





PAGE 




PAGE 




987 


Siverd Family 

Siverd, John B 


1308 


Eyall, Eev. George M....255, 987 


.1308 






Skmner FamOy 


. 907 


Sandberg, George E 


.1345 


Skinner, Lon H 


. 907 


Sandles Family 


.1595 


Skog, J. Oscar 


.1386 


Sandles, Harlan P 


.1595 


Sloan, Barclay S 


. 686 


Sawyer, Peter 


.1324 


Sloan Family 


. 686 


Schall, Eeuben E, M. D.... 


. 891 


Smith, Mrs. Alfred L 


. 604 


Schrader, Mrs. Mary A 


.1080 


Smith, Andrew J 


. 987 




.1079 


Smith, Clarence R 


. 911 


Schrader, William J 


.1080 


Smith, Ebby W 


.1349 








. 890 








Seanor Family 


. 695 


891, 910, 911, 94: 


2, 963 


Seanor, Harrison 


. 695 


987, 1254, 1349, 1445, 1458 


, 1580 


Sechler Family 


.1196 


Smith, Howard D 


.1580 


Sechler, Joseph G 


.1196 


Smith, Jacob 


.1445 


Serena, Joseph 


. 901 


Smith, John 


.1254 
.1472 


Serena, William B 


. 901 


Smith, Dr. John H 


Sexton, Mrs. Alice T> 


. 765 


Smith, John R 


. 910 


Sexton Daniel 


. 765 
. 764 


Smith, John T 

Smith, Stacy H 


. 963 


Sexton, Jeremiah 


.1458 


Shaffer Families 1217, 

Shaffer, Frank H 




Snyder Families . . . . 




.1507 


....949, 1085, 1318, 1495, 


1562 


Shaffer, Harry 


.1373 


Snyder, George J 


.1318 


Shaffer, Jacob 


.1373 


Snyder, Harry A 


.1561 




.1217 


Snyder, Harvey C 

Snyder Jackson K 


.1495 


Shaffer, Uoyd S 

Shank Family 


1346 


.1086 


.1154 


Snyder, John D 


. 949 


Shank, Harvey W 


.1154 


Snyder, John W 


.1552 


Shaulis, Edward F., M. D . . . 


. 907 


Snyder, William H 


.1086 


Shaulis Family 


. 907 


Somerville, Ezekiel 


.1280 


Sheaffer, Elliott W 


.1587 


Somerville Family 


.1280 


Sheaffer, Henry 


.1587 


Sommerville, Alan 


. 718 




.1304 


Speedy Family 


.1382 


Shearer, Samuel W 


.1304 


Speedy, J. Clark 


.1382 


Sheffler Family 


.1220 


Spencer Family 


.1159 


ShefBer, Samuel 


.1219 


Spencer, Capt. Peter C 


.1159 


Sherman, Jonathan C 


.1540 


Spicher, Clarence C, M. D. . . 


. 956 


Sherman, John H 








.1074 


Spicher, Samuel 

Spiers Family 

Spiers, Harrison 


.1327 


Shields Families 


.1153 


861, 1010, 1050, 1074 


, 1234 


.1153 


Shields, Franklin 

Shields, George C 


1010 






.1050 


Sproull, Eev. William J.. 251 


S, 762 








Shields, Samuel M 


.1234 


620, 803, 1014 


, 1575 


Shields, William 

Shields, William D 


1035 






.1085 


St. Clair, James 


.1393 


Shields, W. L., M. D 


. 860 


St. Clair, James J 


. 803 


Shirley Family 

Shirley, Thomas Elgin 


1031 




619 


.1031 


St. Clair, Mrs. Mary E 


.1370 


Short, Blaine 


.1405 


St. Clair, Samuel G 


.1575 


Short Families. . . .767, 1405, 


, 1586 


St. Clair, William A 


.1014 


Short, George M 


.1586 


Stadtmiller, Bennet 


. 1509 


Short, William J 


. 767 


Stadtmiller Family 


.1509 


Shultz, Henry 


.1016 


Stahl, Harry D 


.1269 


Shultz, Thomas G 


.1016 


Stahl, Samuel E 


. 1269 


Sickenberger Family 


.1353 


Stahl Family 


.1268 


Sickenberger, William N. . . . 


.1353 


Stahll, Washington 


.1123 


Sides, Adam 

Sides Families. .. .1200, 1312 


1466 






, 1466 


Stanley, Tracy C 


.1482 


Sides, Stuart J 


.1312 


Stear Family 


.1130 


Sides, William 


.1200 


Stear, John 


.1237 


Silvis, Jacob 


.1447 


Stear, John C 


.1130 










....754, 775, 1022, 1063 


, 1407 


Steele Family 


. 651 


Simpson, George E., M. D. . . 


. 775 


Steele, Samuel C 


. 651 


Simpson, Hugh 


. 874 


Steffey, Calvin H 


.1484 


Simpson, Nathaniel C 


.1063 


Steffey Families 1484, 


, 1506 


Simpson, Robert E 


.1407 


Steffey, Scott V 


.1506 


Simpson, William A., M. D. 


. 754 


Steffy, Mrs. Mary J 


. 1511 



PAGE 

Steffy, Thomas S 1511 

Stephens, Benjamin L 1443 

Stephens, Edward H 1466 

Stephens Families 

670, 862, 1211, 1296, 1466 

Stephens, George M 674 

Stephens, Harry 1296 

Stephens, John H 675 

Stephens, Judge Marlin B 675 

Stephens, Samuel H 1538 

Stephens, T. D., M. D 862 

Stephens, WiUiam S 672 

Stephens, Thomas P 1211 

Sterner Family 1496 

Sterner, Harry E 1496 

Stevens, Samuel 1039 

Stewart, Alexander H., M. D. 954 

Stewart, Archibald T 1497 

Stewart, Archible 1174 

Stewart, Archie J 1172 

Stewart, Charles C 706 

Stewart Families . . . 703, 793, 954 

1020, 1120, 1172, 1174 

. . . .1314, 1321, 134.5, 1497, 1504 

Stewart, George R 1314 

Stewart, James C 704 

Stewart, James N 793 

Stewart, John 1321 

Stewart, John G 704 

Stewart, Joseph C 1037 

Stewart, J. Milton 1345 

Stewart, John Murdock, M. D.1120 

Stewart, Joshua T 705 

Stewart, Miss Marinda 1174 

Stewart, Robert L 1504 

Stewart, Robert M 1020 

Stewart, Welmer D 1020 

Stiffey, Cyrus 1255 

Stiffey Family 1255 

Stitt Family 824 

Stitt, William H 824 

Stiver, Adam T 858 

Stiver Family 858 

Stonebraker Family 1431 

Stonebraker, Henry 1431 

Stoops, David 1474 

Stoops, Robert 1474 

Stouffer, Cyrus 1126 

Stouffer Family 1126 

Strawbridge, Eobert 1486 

Streams, J. A 1162 

Streams Families 1076, 1162 

Streams, Samuel 1162 

Strong Family 1489 

Strong, Lowry F . -. 1489 

Strong, Wavne P 1110 

Stuehul, Robert H 1148 

Sutor Family 1258 

Sutor, Eufus A 1258 

Sutton Families 602, 912 

Sutton, J. Blair 912 

Sutton, Thomas 602 

Swank Family 1386 

Swank, George W 1386 

Swartz, D. Harvey 1490 

Swartz Family 1490 

Swasy Family 957 

Swasy, John H 957 

Taylor Families 724, 1512 

Taylor, Harrison L 634 

Taylor, John Bell 724 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



PAGE 

Taylor, William B 1512 

Telford, Eev. John C, D. D. . 603 
Telford, Judge Stephen J 

384, 392, 603 

Templeton Families 1067, 1303 

Templeton, Eobert F 1067 

Templeton, William N 1503 

Thomas, Evan J 1152 

Thomas Families 

....616, 1151, 1168, 1328, 1331 

Thomas, Hiram 1325 

Thomas, H. Wallace 616 

Thomas, Jesse 1331 

Thomas, John C 1227 

Thomas, Lewis 1151 

Thomas, Lewis M 1309 

Thomas, Thomas D 1168 

Thomas, Verna C 1328 

Thomas, Wilson C 1325 

Thompson Families . . 708, 782, 

1054, 1178, 1422, 1578 

Thompson, Harry E 785 

Thompson, Horace J 782 

Thompson, John D 1054 

Thompson, John G 1422 

Thompson, J. Wilson 1178 

Thompson, John M 784 

Thompson, Eobert A 708 

Thompson, Thomas W 1578 

Thompson, WilHam 882 

Tiger Family 1263 

Tiger, Jacob 1263 

Timblin Family 1574 

Timblin, Ward N., V. S 1574 

Tomb Families 737, 795 

Tomb, Hugh D 795 

Tomb, John C 797 

Tomb, Eobert J., M. D 737 

Travis Family 1531 

Travis, Harry M 1531 

Travis, William G 1531 

Treese (Dreese) Family 1499 

Treese, William C 1499 

Trefny, Eev. Charles L 997 

Trimble, Mrs. Drusilla 1358 

Trimble, Felix B 1206 

Trimble, George 1358 

Trimble, Thomas 1206 

Trindle, Eobert 1379 

Trindle, William 1379 

Truby, Simeon H 1186 

Truby Family 1186 

Truitt Family 985 

Truitt, Dr. Harry W 985 

Tuck, Charles W 832 

Uncapher, Albert F 1147 

Uncapher Families 1147, 1384 

Uncapher, Joseph W 1384 

Urey, William M 1197 

Vogel Brothers 1339 

Vogel, Edward G 1340 

Vogel, John W 1340 

Waddell Family 1485 

Waddell, Samuel E 1485 

Waddle Family 971 

Waddle, James E 972 

Waddle, Samuel 972 

Wagner Families 732, 1310 



PAGE 

Wagner, John W 1310 

Wagner, Joseph Sides 1311 

Wagner, William B 732 

Wainwright Family 1332 

Wainwright, Samuel M 1332 

Wakefield, Edward B 950 

Wakefield Families 700, 950 

Wakefield, James M 700 

Walker Families ..666, 1093, 1101 

Walker, James G 1093 

Walker, Eobert A 666 

Walker, Samuel W 1101 

Walker, Zenas T 1584 

Wallace, Ephraim 999 

Wallace Families 999, 1385 

Wallace, Harry W 1385 

Walter Family 910 

Walter, William 910 

Waltemire Family 1267 

Waltemire, Jesse B 1267 

Warden Familv 1076 

Wardrop, William B 1525 

Warrick, James 887 

Warrick, Mrs. Margaret 887 

Family 1152 

J Peter W 1152 

Waterson, John 1362 

Watson, Alexander P 1350 

Watson Families 655, 1350 

Watson, James P 656 

Watson, Thomas C 656 

Watt Families 728, 1403 

Watt, John W 728 

Watt, Thomas M 1403 

Way Family 1330 

Way, Jesse L 1330 

Weamer, Andrew 1326 

Weamer Family 1326 

Weamer, Harrv L 764 

Wehrle, Eichard W 1184 

Wehrle Family 1184 

Weir Family 1196 

Weir, John 1196 

Weiss, Frederick 1228 

Weitzel Families 876, 950 

Weitzel, Frederick 875 

Weitzel, William F., M. D 950 

Welch, Edgar J 1078 

Welch Family 1078 

Welehonee Family 1028 

Welchonee, Harry M 1029 

Welehonee, Svlvester C 1028 

Wells, John C 1561 

Wells Family 1561 

Welteroth, Joseph 1405 

West Family 723 

West, Frank W 723 

Wetzel Family 955 

Wetzel, Samuel S 955 

Wheeler, John 1390 

White Families 575, 1149 

White, Gen. Harry. . .384, 387, 580 
White, Judge Thomas. 383, 385, 575 

Widdowson, Clark B 1052 

Widdowson, Edmund 777 

Widdowson, Mrs. Estella 962 

Widdowson Families 

777, 1052, 1136, 1236, 1244, 1367 

Widdowson, Harvey D 1136 

Widdowson, Harvey E 1236 

Widdowson, John D 962 

Widdowson, Joseph A 1244 



PAGE 

Widdowson, Nelson 1367 

Wieczorek, Eev. Francis L . . . 943 

Wiggins, Albert A 1457 

Wiggins, Judge Coulter 

389, 470, 669 

Wiggins, Mrs. Elizabeth 1457 

Wiggins Families 669, 1231 

Wiggins, James E 1231 

Wiggins, Mrs. Sarah J 1529 

Wiggins, Thomas 1529 

Wiley Family 1276 

Wiley, James M 1276 

Wilhelm, Augustus 1041 

Williams, Elmer E 736 

Williams, Hugh E 1273 

Williams Families . . 736, 990, 
1101, 1171, 1193, 1210, 1273, 1364 

Williams, John J 1193 

Williams. John W 1170 

Williams, Joseph T 1364 

Williams, Eichard 990 

Williams, William M 1209 

Williamson Family 906 

Williamson, Jesse J 906 

Willy, Christ 1509 

Wilson, Andrew W 393, 720 

Wilson, Bradley W 1043 

Wilson Families 

617, 626, 720, 819, 966, 1362 

Wilson, Frank 1362 

Wilson, Harry W 720 

Wilson, J. Willis 626 

Wilson, Marsellen C 1366 

Wilson, Mrs. Marsellen C 1366 

Wilson, Eobert 1043 

Wilson, Eobert H 617 

Wilson, Eobert M 393, 734 

Wilson, Eev. AV. J 247, 1597 

Wimer Family 963 

Wineberg Family 1477 

Wineberg, Martin C 1477 

Wingert, Henry G 1527 

Winsheimer, Frank 1175 

Winsheimer Family 1175 

Winters, Henry C 1508 

Wissinger, Mrs. Elizabeth El- 
len 1271 

Wissinger Family 1421 

Wissinger, Lewis S 1271 

Wissinger, James 1421 

Wohlers, Qaus 1452 

Wohlers. Mrs. Flora 1453 

Wood, Dr. Edwin K 825 

Woolweaver Family 1453 

Woolweaver, John A 1453 

Work, David Brown 981 

Work FamiUes 744, 980 

Work, Milton 744 

Work, Silas W 982 

Work, William A. S 982 

Wortman, Calvin M 1415 

Wortman Family 1415 

Wray Family 619 

Wright FamOy 1427 

Wright, JefEerson 1427 

Wyncoop Family 1547 

Wyncoop, James S 1547 

Wynkoop Families 664, 1290 

Wynkoop, Matthew B 1290 

Wynkoop, Matthew C 664 



xii BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 

PAGE PAGE PAGE 

Young Family 815 Yoimkins, Jacob 1463 Zelmer Family 1076 

Young, Mrs. Jane 815 Younkins, Jacob B 1463 Zehner, Peter 1076 

Young, Prof. Josias H 877 Zener Family 1414 

Young, Levi 815 Zacur, George 1507 Zener, Mary 1414 

Young, Eobert 877 Zanoni, Dante 1593 




^u 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



WILLIAM B. ANSLEY, M. D., of Salts- college course, after which he taught several 
burg, has made a record in his profession terms in the common schools. Having de- 
which places him second to none in Indiana termined upon medicine as his life vocation, 
county. Besides giving unflagging attention he began study in the office of Dr. C. Mc- 
to the demands of a large private practice, he Ewen, of Plumville, and after reading six 
has been president of the county medical months with him entered the office of Dr. R. 
society, vice president of the State society, a S. Sutton, of Pittsburg. The rest of his pro- 
contributor to medical literature and a cit- fessional preparation was received in the Jef- 
izen whose activities have always been di- ferson Medical College, Philadelphia, where 
rected toward serving general interests. He he attended three courses of lectures and was 
has been in practice for over forty -five years, graduated in 1867. Immediately afterward 
since 1877 at Saltsburg. he opened an ofRee at Apollo, Armstrong Co., 

Dr. Ansley is a native of Indiana county, Pa., where he practiced for ten years with 
born Aug. 2, 1847, in South Mahoning town- good success, thence in 1877 moving to Salts- 
ship, and is of pioneer and Revolutionary burg. Dr. Ansley 's skill and conscientious 
stock, his great-grandfather, John Ansley, devotion to those who depend upon him for 
having served in the Revolution as a soldier professional services has attracted and held 
in the American army, while his brother com- an extensive patronage, nevertheless his liigh- 
manded a company on the British side. John minded zeal for the good of his profession 
Ansley, who was a farmer by occupation, has led him to be active and useful also, in 
moved from New Jersey to Westmoreland association with his fellow physicians, in pro- 
county. Pa. His son, Daniel Ansley, the moting its welfare as a whole, raising its 
Doctor's grandfather, was born in 1798 in standards, and working faithfully along lines 
that county, and followed farming there until favorable to its progress. His valuable serv- 
1837, when he came to Indiana county. He ices have received public recognition in va- 
died in 1858, aged sixty years. rious ways. He was elected president of the 

James Ansley, son of Daniel, was born in Indiana County Medical Society ; was a mem- 
1825, and became extensively interested in ber of the committee on medical legislation of 
farming and stock raising in Rayne town- the Pennsylvania State Medical Society ; has 
ship, this county. He was prominent in lo- been one of the vice presidents of that so- 
cal affairs, serving as a deacon in the Bap- ciety, and was a United States pension ex- 
tist Church, and in important public capaci- aminer, serving as secretary of the board 
ties, having been auditor of Indiana county, while holding the latter position. He is a 
and justice of the peace of Rayne township, member of the American Medical Association, 
In politics he was a Republican. He mar- and of the Pittsburg Obstetrical Society, and 
ried Sarah Spencer, who was born near Johns- has found some time for writing, having pre- 
town, in Cambria county, and she, too, was pared articles for various medical journals. 
a member of the Baptist Church. Mr. Ans- He is a past master in the Masonic fraternity, 
ley died Feb. 23, 1895, Mrs. Ansley April 13, and a past grand in the I. 0. O. P. Like his 
1909. parents he is a Baptist in religion, being a 

William B. Ansley, the second of the three leading member of the Saltsburg Church, of 
children born to his parents, grew mp on a which he is a deacon, and he has also been 
farm. He received his early literary edu- active in the Sunday school, at present teach- 
cation in Dayton academy, and later took a ing the men's Beracha class, which has an en- 

51 

801 



802 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



rollment of thirty-eight members. lie was 
formerly superintendent. 

In politics Dr. Ansley is a progressive Re- 
publican. He has served twenty-six years as 
member of the board of school directors, of 
which body he first became a member in 1882, 
and during the greater part of this time has 
been president of the board. 

HARRY CALVIN WATT PATTERSON, 
president and treasurer of the Patterson Mill- 
ing Company, of Saltsburg, Indiana county, 
present burgess of that borough, is one of the 
leading citizens of that section, where in busi- 
ness and official connections he has been able 
to advance local interests in various ways. He 
was born at Murrysville. ^Vestmoreland Co., 
Pa., Oct. 29. 1878, son of the late Jlartin V. 
Patterson and grandson of IMartin Patterson. 
Martin Patterson, the grandfather, was a 
native of Ireland, boni in County Down, and 
married in that country Ann Kidd, of the 
same county. On coming to America they set- 
tled near Murrj-sville. in Westmoreland 
county, Pa., where ilr. Patterson became ex- 
tensively interested in farming, owning a tract 
of three hundred acres. He died in 1865, at 
the age of sixty-nine yeai-s, his wife passing 
away in 1874, at the age of seventy -seven. In 
politics he was a Democrat, and both were 
membei-s of the Presbyterian Church. They 
had the following children: James, David, 
Samuel, Joseph, Jane, Martin V., Sadie, Re- 
becca and Bell. 

Martin V. Patterson, son of Martin, was 
born Dec. 12, 1839, at Murrysville, in Fi-ank- 
lin township, Westmoreland county, and re- 
ceived a common school education. When a 
young man he entered the employ of the Pitts- 
burg Street Railway Company, and in 1861 
went to Oil City, Pa., being interested in the 
oil business for a number of years following, 
first as a well driller, but soon becoming a 
contractor, operating in different fields in 
western Pennsylvania, eastern Ohio and north- 
ern West Virginia. In 1875 he became en- 
gaged in the sawmill business in Indiana and 
Westmoreland counties. Pa., carrying it on 
until 1881, when he established a waterpower 
flour mill on the Conemaugh river at Salts- 
burg. In 1885 he formed a partnership with 
John Hersliey and they purchased the Salts- 
burg Flouring Mill, which they conducted 
under the firm name of the Saltsburg Flour- 
ing Jlill Company until 1900. The water- 
power of this mill was destroyed by the Johns- 
town flood in 1889. In ]89() ]Mr. Pattei-son re- 
modeled his mill, putting in steam and the rol- 



ler process, and continued to manufacture 
high and fancy grades of roller flour, most of 
which went to supply the local demand, 
though some was shipped to other markets. 
In 1903 Mr. Patterson admitted his son Harry 
to partnership, and the elder man retained his 
interest and connection with the business un- 
til his death, which occurred July 1-4. 1909. 
He is buried in the Saltsburg cemetery. 

ilr. Patterson was one of the foremost men 
in the administration of public affairs in Salts- 
burg in his day. He sei-ved fifteen years as 
a school director, ten years as member of the 
town council, and two terms as burgess, and 
was once a candidate for sheriff of Indiana 
county. He was prominent in all matters 
affecting the welfare of his town and county, 
was a Democrat in political association, and 
in his religious connection was a Presbyterian 
and active in church work, holding the office 
of trustee. He was particularly well known 
in the fraternal bodies, holding membei-ship 
in Williamson Lodge. No. 431, F. & A. M. ; 
Local Branch No. 141. Order of the Iron Hall ; 
Kiskimiuetas Castle, No. 223, Knights of the 
Golden Eagle; Saltsburg Commandery, No. 
22. K. G. E. ; Saltsburg Council, No. 381, Royal 
Arcanum; Loyal Lodge, No. 165, Knights of 
Honor; and Diamond Council, No. 248, Jr. 
0. U. A. M. 

On June 15, 1876, Mr. Patterson married 
Anna L. Watt, daughter of Judge Isaac Watt, 
of Homer City, this county, who served one 
term as associate judge of the courts of In- 
diana county. Mrs. Patterson now makes her 
home with her son Harry at Saltsburg. Two 
children were born to her and' her husband : 
Harry C. W. and Grace Rella, the latter the 
wife "of Dr. J. K. Beatty, of Ford City, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Harry C. W. Patterson obtained his early 
education in the common schools of Salts- 
burg and Saltsburg high school, graduating 
from the latter, and then attended the Kis- 
kimiuetas Springs School, from which he was 
graduated. Then he took a course at the 
Eastman Business College, Poughkeepsie, N. 
Y., from which he was graduated in 1896. and 
also attended the State normal school at In- 
diana, Pa. During the Spanish- American 
war Mr. Patterson was in the ser^^ice nine 
months, as a member of Company D, 5th Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, and was stationed at 
Chickamauga. After that experience he went 
to the University of Pennsylvania, where he 
studied dentistry for two years, but he did 
not finish his preparation for the profession. 
For a time he was in tlie cmjiloy of the United 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



803 



States Steel Company, at Vandergi-ift, Pa., as 
paymaster, and then became his father's part- 
ner in the flour milling business, in which he 
has ever since been interested. On Sept. 13, 
1911, the mill was destroyed by fire, and he 
is now erecting a new plant, 40 by 60 feet in 
dimensions, five stories high, to be equipped 
with the most approved i;p-to-date machin- 
ery, and operated throughout by electricity. 
It will be the model establishment of its kind 
in this region. The business was incorpoi-ated 
in 1911 as the Patterson Milling Company, of 
which Mr. Patterson is president and treas- 
urer. He also has extensive real estate in- 
terests in and around Saltsburg, and has had 
some important dealings in that line. 

ilr. Patterson has been actively associated 
with the local government, has served as bor- 
ough auditor for six years, and in 1909 was 
elected burgess, in which ofiice he still is serv- 
ing. He is one of the most popular officials of 
Saltsburg, his wideawake disposition and pro- 
gressive spirit doing much to encourage and 
promote local enterprises. In politics he is 
a 'Republican. Fraternally he belongs to sev- 
eral orders, the Elks, Odd Fellows and Ma- 
sons, and has been prominent in such circles, 
being a past grand in the Odd Fellows and a 
past master of Williamson Lodge, No. 431, of 
Saltsburg. He is a member of Kedron Com- 
mandery. No. 18, Knights Templars, of 
Greensburg, and of Syria Temple, Mystic 
Shrine, of Pittsburg. Mr. Patterson has the 
Masonic papers his grandfather brought to 
this country from Ireland, introducing him 
to the fraternity, dated 1829. His religious 
connection is with the Presbyterian Church, 
to which his wife and mother also belong. 

On June 20, 1906, Mr. Patterson married 
Marion Dougherty, daughter of James R. and 
Ellen (Welsh) Dougherty, of Newcastle, Pa., 
and they have one child, Martin, born Sept. 
7, 1907. 

JAMES JAMESON St. CLAIR, of West 
Wheatfield township, Indiana county, is one 
of the typically representative members of a 
family which has been well and favorably 
known in this locality for considerably more 
than a century. 

The St. Clairs are of Scotch-Irish origin, a 
branch of the St. Clair family of Scotland, 
which was founded in the middle ages by 
Sir Walderne de St. Clair, a Norman knight, 
who married Margaret, daughter of Richard, 
Duke of Normandy. Their second son, Wil- 
liam, settled in Scotland, and one of his de- 
scendants, William St. Clair, became prince 



of the Orkney islands under the king of Nor- 
way, and high chancellor of Scotland under 
the royal house of Bruce. In 1741 the St. 
Clairs exchanged their lofty title and island 
domains for the earldom of Caithness, which 
they still hold. The name has since become 
Anglicized to Sinclair. Two of the descend- 
ants of one of these earls, through a younger 
son, were Gen. Arthur St. Clair and his cousin 
James St. Clair, Sr., the former of whom was 
president of the Continental Congress in 1787 
and commander in chief of the armies of the 
United States in 1791. 

James St. Clair, Sr., was the great-great- 
grandfather of James Jameson St. Clair. His 
parents were natives of the North of Ireland, 
and he was born in 1741 in eastern Pennsyl- 
vania. He lived nine miles from York, Pa., 
where he owned a valuable farm and mill, and 
he was not only a prosperous citizen of his 
time but an earnest sympathizer with the 
Colonial cause, serving throughout the Revo- 
lutionary war. His wife's maiden name was 
Miller. James St. Clair, Sr., died in York 
county in 1806, at the age of sixty-five years. 

James St. Clair, one of the sons of James 
St. Clair, Sr., was born in York (now Adams) 
county, Pa., May 4, 1774, and passed the 
greater part of his mature life in Indiana 
county. Pa. In 1809 he came to Bi-ushvalley 
township, in 1816 removing to what is now 
the northern part- of White township, where 
he took up a quarter section of government 
land and followed farming for many years. 
He died in Center township, this county, April 
8, 1855, at the advanced age of eighty-one. 
He was an old-line Whig in politics. He mar- 
ried Jennie Slemmons. who was born in Lan- 
caster, Pa., of Irish descent, and was reared 
in Washington county, Pa., her father, Wil- 
liam Slemmons, removing from Lancaster to 
Washington county in 1790 and there follow- 
ing farming until his death, which occurred 
in 1820, in his sixtieth year. Mr. Slemmons 
was justice of the peace, by governor's ap- 
pointment, for a period of thirty years, and 
he was a man of the highest character and of 
honorable standing. His wife's maiden 
name was Boggs, and they had several chil- 
dren. Mrs. Jennie (Slemmons) St. Clair died 
Oct. 15, 1855, aged seventy-one j'ears, a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church. She and her 
husband had a family of ten children, namely : 
IMargaret, William S., Mary W., James, Sam- 
uel, Isaac, John, Robert, Thomas and Hiram. 
Samuel St. Clair, son of James and Jennie 
(Slemmons) St. Clair, passed all his life in 
West Wheatfield township, following farming 



804 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



on a large tract of land now owned by James 
Overdorff. For many yeara he served as con- 
stable. He married Rebecca Jameson, and 
they are buried in Bethel Church cemetery. 
They had fourteen children, two of whom died 
in infancy, the others being : Nicholas, James, 
Daniel, Archie, Samuel, Hugh, Jane (who 
married Andrew Alcorn), Catherine, Pollie, 
John, Rebecca (who died unmarried) and 



Hugh St. Clair, born in West Wheatfield 
township, grew to manhood there. He fol- 
lowed milling all his life, for some time run- 
ning the Jacob Gamble mill on shares, receiv- 
ing one tliird of the profits. But he did not 
devote all his time to that work, also conduct- 
ing a farm of seventy-five acres in West 
Wheatfield township, and engaging in stock 
raising, lumbering and teaming. Before the 
war he was a Democrat in polities, subse- 
quently a Whig and Republican, and he was 
prominent in all affairs affecting the welfare 
of his township, though he never sought or 
held office. He was married to Julia Ann 
Rutter, whose mother's maiden name was July 
A. Gamble. Mrs. St. Clair died in West 
Wheatfield township, and she and her husband 
are interred in the Germany Church cemetery 
there. They were members of the M. E. 
Church. This couple had children as follows, 
all born in West Wheatfield township : John 
married Nancy Jane Buchanan (lie followed 
the lumber business in Tennessee) ; Rebecca 
became the wife of Samuel Felton ; Catherine 
married Isaiah Brantlinger; Samuel mar- 
ried and resides in Logan, Ohio ; Harriet Jane 
became the wife of Thomas Brantlinger; 
Emma married William Lickenfeld, and both 
died in West Wheatfield township; Sarah 
Elizabeth, born March 6, 1857, married James 
M. Wakefield, commissioner of Indiana 
county ; James Jameson is mentioned below ; 
Jacob B. married Emma Lickenfeld, and re- 
sides in Conemaugh township, this county; 
Julia, deceased, was the wife of Samuel Brend- 
linger. 

James Jameson St. Clair was horn Dec. 16, 
1859, in West Wheatfield township, and at- 
tended the Gamble and Dick schools there. 
He worked with his father at the mill and also 
learned mill-wrighting and carpentry, being 
thus engaged until his marriage. At that time 
he moved to Garfield, where he was employed 
by the Lincoln Fire Brick Company for six 
years, afterward assisting in the construction 
of the present Robinson brickyards. In time 
he became interested in contracting and build- 
ing, which line he now follows, and he has 



erected many fine residences and barns in his 
own and surrounding townships and in the 
neighboring towns. He has shown himself to 
be a reliable architect, and he is an all-around 
mechanic, having acquired the greater part 
of his information by practical experience 
and making the most of his opportunities. He 
can repair almost any piece of machinery. In 
connection with his other work he carries on 
a 100-acre farm which be bought from the 
Sides estate, is engaged in stock raising to 
some extent, and also does teaming and lum- 
bering. Though so thoroughly occupied with 
his private affairs he has found time for pub- 
lic service, having been auditor of West 
Wheatfield township for a number of years. 
In politics he is an independent Republican. 
Mr. St. Clair married Emma Clara Wake- 
field, daughter of Thomas and Ann (Sides) 
Wakefield, and they have had six children: 
(1) Samuel Bert, born July 28, 1879, was an 
employee of the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany at Pitcairn, Pa., for ten years, and is 
now at home, farming with his father. (2) 
Ira Alvin, formerly a school teacher in West 
Wheatfield township, is now employed by the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Pitcairn, 
Pa. (3) Joseph Carl, formerly a school 
teacher in West Wheatfield township, is now 
following the carpenter's trade at Turtle 
Creek, Pa. (4) Clara Estella married R. B. 
Mack and resides at Pitcairn, Pa. (5) Charles 
Ivan is in the employ of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company at Pitcairn, Pa. (6) 
Flora Mildred was born Feb. 6, 1903. AU 
of the family belong to Bethel M. E. Church, 
of which Mr. St. Clair has been steward, trus- 
tee and class leader. 

JOSEPH J. McCRACKEN, justice of the 
peace, undertaker, and contractor and builder 
of Creekside, Washington township, was born 
in the northern part of Indiana county, in 
1858, and is a son of Joseph and Mary (Hun- 
ter) McCracken, natives of Ireland. 

On first coming to the United States, at the 
age of fourteen years, Joseph McCracken 
settled in Philadelphia, where he was later 
married. He then came to Indiana county and 
started a tannery, having learned the trade 
in his native land, and he subsequentlj' opened 
a tannery in the town of Kelleysburg, which 
he operated for some time. Turning his at- 
tention to agricultural pursuits, he took up 
timbered land in the northern part of In- 
diana county, cut down the logs to build his 
fii-st house, and spent the balance of his life 
in tilling the soil. His death occurred at the 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



805 



home of a daughter. He and his wife had 
nine children, as follows: David, who lives 
at Kent, Pa. ; Elizabeth, the wife of William 
Gardner, living at Glen Campbell ; Alexander, 
deceased, who was a farmer near Creekside, 
and was accidentally killed on the Buffalo, 
Rochester & Pittsburg railroad, during the 
latter part of 1910; Sarah, wife of Daniel 
Smith, living at Gipsy; Joseph J.; Emma, 
wife of James Lowe, living at Homer City, 
Pa.; Anna, widow of P. Savar, of Rochester 
Mills; Hughey, who died in infancy; and 
Thomas, who is deceased. 

Joseph J. McCracken was born on the home 
farm and attended the Doty school, and as a 
youth devoted his energies to wood chopping 
and to rafting on the Susquehanna river, 
subsequently becoming a pilot between Lock- 
haven and Cherrytree. He afterward learned 
the trade of carpenter, which he followed for 
a long period, and came to Creekside long be- 
fore the railroads reached that point. He 
has erected many of the residences of the 
borough, assisted in organizing same, and 
shortly after coming here was elected justice 
of the peace, in which office he is serving his 
third term, in addition to which he has acted 
in the capacity of overseer of Grant township. 
He has also established himself in the under- 
taking business. 

In August, 1889, Mr. McCracken was 
united in marriage with Lillian Riggs, who 
was bom in Jefferson county. Pa., daughter of 
George and Mary (McKee) Riggs, the former 
of whom was in early life a farmer. After 
coming to Reynolds ville, Pa., Mr. Riggs was 
elected constable. ■ He met with a sudden 
death and was buried in Beechwood cemetery, 
his widow still surviving and making her home 
at Reynoldsville. There were three children 
in their family: Myrtle, who is deceased; 
Mack, in the service of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company ; and Mrs. McCracken. To 
Mr. and Mrs. McCracken there have been born 
seven children : Edna, wife of Ramy Stutsil, 
living in Creekside, who has one child, Jo- 
seph ; Clyde, who lives at Steubenville, Ohio ; 
Ralph, employed in the drug store at Creek- 
side; Clifford, at home; Ritta ; and Beulah 
and Bessie, who died in infancy. 

Mr. McCracken is a member of the Fra- 
ternal Order of Eagles, and of Savar Lodge, 
I. 0. 0. F., at Rochester Mills, Indiana county, 
in which he has passed all the chairs. 

ORRIN J. PATTISON, proprietor of the 
large livery and sales stables at Penn Run, 
Pa., and also engaged in farming in Cherry- 



hill township, was bom at Penn Run, Indi- 
ana county, Aug. 2, 1885, son of "William C. 
and Addie M. (Empfield) Pattison, both of 
whom were born and reared in Indiana county. 

William C. Pattison was reared to the vo- 
cation of an agriculturist and throughout his 
life devoted himself to tilling the soil. His 
death occurred in California, but the causes 
and exact place are unknown. His widow still 
resides in Penn Run. They had two children, 
Orrin J. and June E. 

Orrin J. Pattison spent his boyhood days 
in Penn Run, where he attended public school, 
subsequently going to school at Marion Cen- 
ter. After leaving scliool he was employed 
at work on the home farm, and while there 
prepared himself for teaching, subsequently 
following the profession of educator in Cher- 
r3diill township for eight terms, and later in 
Pine township. In 1910, however, he gave up 
teaching to enter the livery business in Penn 
Run, and this he has continued to conduct 
to the present time, also following general 
farming in Cherryhill township. 

On Juhr 24, 1907, Mr. Pattison was mar- 
ried to Elsie Shank, who was born March 7, 
1881, in Penn Run, daughter of Jacob and 
Mary Fyock Shank. Her father, an early 
settler of Penn Run, and a veteran of the 
Civil war, died in November, 1910, while her 
mother still survives and makes her home at 
Penn Run. They had five children : William 
E., residing at Gary, Ind. ; Anna, the wife 
of Louis Follmar, of Johnstown, Pa. ; Savila, 
wife of Augustus Geesey, of Buffalo, N. Y. ; 
Louis ; and Elsie, the wife of IMr. Pattison. 

Mr. Pattison and his wife are members of 
the Presbyterian Church. He takes a dis- 
tinct interest in public and educational mat- 
ters, and serves as auditor of Cherryhill town- 
ship, and as trustee of the Sumner normal 
school at Penn Run. 

JOSEPH TAYLOR BOUCHER, tax col- 
lector for Indiana borough, is a native of In- 
diana county and has passed all his life in 
Indiana and the adjoining territory. 

The Boucher family is of French extraction, 
and one branch has been established in Can- 
ada, one of its members being John Boucher, 
a noted character, whose skill as a guide and 
trapper in the wilds of Canada gave him a 
wicle reputation; on his father's side he was 
of French and Irish blood, and his mother 
was a full-blooded Chippewa Indian. Fran- 
cois Boucher, the noted French painter, was 
also of this family. 

Henry Boucher, grandfather of Joseph Tay- 



806 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



lor Boucher, was born in Virginia. Slay 15, 
1780. and was a cabinetmaker, following an 
occupation in which many of the family have 
been engaged. In April. 1802. he married at 
Hanover. Pa.. Elizabeth Wolfe, of that place, 
born Jan. 6. 17S4. and they subsequently re- 
moved to Frankstown, Pa., on the Juniata, 
thence to Brushvalley. in Indiana county. In 
1815 they remoyed to Rayne township. Indi- 
ana eountv. Mrs. Boucher died here Mav 31, 
1852. Jlr.* Boucher on Dec. 6, 1853. Their 
children were as follows: John, born Dec. 
17, 1802; Henry, born Oct. 4, 180-4; Eliza- 
beth, born Feb. 6, 1807; Slargaret. born 
March 9. 1809; David, born Aug. 21. 1811; 
Andrew, born Aug. 31, 1813 ; Eve. born ]\Iareh 
4, 1816; Catherine, born May 19, 1818; Jacob, 
bom Julv 12. 1820; William, born Oct. 4, 
1822 ; and Susan, born Jan. 22, 1827. 

Henry Boucher, son of Henry, born Oct. 4, 
1804, at Frankstown, Pa., received his educa- 
tion in the common schools. He was reared 
to farm life, and also learned his father's 
trade, cabinetmaking. for which he had great 
aptitude, being able to make anything in 
wood, and under his father's skillful instruc- 
tion became a fine workman. The father used 
to make the old-fashioned windmills. Heniy 
Boucher (Jr.) lived in White township and 
later in the borough of Indiana, where he died 
Aug. 9. 1865. He married Catherine Dod- 
son, of Bedford county. Pa., daughter of Jo- 
seph Dodson, and she survived him a few 
years, dying Aug. 21, 1869. Their children 
were born as follows: Elizabeth. Nov. 16, 
1834 (married Isaac Kening and died in 
1870) : George, April 30, 1836 (died in Oc- 
tober. 1869) : Blarv C, March 29, 1838 (died 
March 8. 1857) : "Alexander, Mav 25, 1841 
(died :\rav 29, 1875) ; Nancv J., March 29, 
1844 (died in 1875) ; Joseph Tavlor, Aug. 17, 
1848: Sarah I., 1854 (died in 1857). 

Joseph T. Boucher passed his early life in 
White township and the borough of Indiana, 
■receiving his education in the common schools. 
He began work when twelve years old, at the 
paper mill there, his wages being one dollar 
a week, for which he did chores and per- 
formed miscellaneous duties. In 1865 he be- 
gan house painting, at which he was engaged 
for some time, in the emplo.v of others, about 
1874 embarking in the business on his own 
account. He acquired a profitable patronage, 
keeping a crew of men busy, and continued 
in this line until 1884. He then opened a 
wall paper and paint store on Church street, 
Indiana, commencing modestly, in a small 
building, and as his business grew moved to 



more commodious quarters, on Philadelphia 
street, being in the ('unningham building un- 
til 1904. 

Mr. Boucher has taken considerable part 
in the local government and the affairs of the 
borough generally, having served four years 
in the council (during three of which he was 
on the finance committee), and he was after- 
ward elected tax collector, in which he has been 
serving for the last six years. He has given 
excellent satisfaction in his public work, his 
business ability and integrity winning the 
confidence of his fellow citizens generally. In 
politics ]\Ir. Boucher is a straight Republican. 
He is a member of the First I'nited Presb3'- 
terian Church of Indiana. 

In 1870 Mr. Boucher married Mary C. Cole- 
man, daughter of Robert Coleman, and she 
died in 1874. the mother of one child. Bertha 
E., who died when seven yeai-s old. On Feb. 
15, 1882, Mr. Boucher married (second) in In- 
diana Mrs. Annie M. (Leidig) Kline, daughter 
of ]\I. A. Leidig, of Hellertown. They have 
no children. 

WILLIAM S. HAMILTON, superintendent 
of the Clymer Water Company, of Indiana, 
Indiana county, is a native of Jefferson 
county. Pa., and belongs to one of the old 
settled families of that section of the State. 
He was born Aug. 6. 1848. son of Robert and 
Margaret (Johnston) Hamilton, and grand- 
son of David Hamilton, who was born in Ire- 
land and came to Jefferson county. Pa., in 
the year 1808. He took up a large tract of 
land, and followed farming. His wife's 
maiden name was jMcFarland. In religion 
he was a Presbyterian. 

Robert Hamilton also became a farmer in 
Jefferson county and was one of the largest 
land holders in that county in his day. He 
was a highly successful business man in every 
line he entered, being extensively engaged as 
a merchant and lumberman in addition to his 
agricultural interests, and prospering in all 
his undertakings. To him and his wife Slar- 
garet (Johnston) were bom the following chil- 
dren : James ; William S. ; David : Elizabeth, 
wife of Dr. A. D. McCombs. of Jeffer.son 
county. Pa. ; Laura, wife of Dr. J. A. Miller, 
now of ^Mexico; and Martha, wife of Dr. J. A. 
Brown, of Brookville. Pa. The three daugh- 
ters all married physicians. The father of 
this family died in 1904. the mother in 1898. 
They were members of the Presbyterian 
Church. 

William S. Hamilton attended public and 
select scliools in his native county. At the 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



807 



age of eighteen he began to clerk in his father's 
store, where he continued until 1876, in 
which year he first came to Indiana. For 
five years he was engaged in the mercantile 
business here on his own account, at the end 
of that period going to Pittsburg, where he 
was engaged as a broker for five years. Re- 
turning to Jefferson county, he lived there 
again for the next fourteen years, in 1904 re- 
turning to Indiana, at which place he has 
since nuide his home. Some time afterward, 
in ilay, 1909. he became superintendent of 
the Clymer Water Company of Indiana, a 
position he still holds, having proved him- 
self highly competent. 

In 1898 Mr. Hamilton married Esther 
Drenning, daughter of Dr. Drenning, of Oil 
City,' Pa. They have two children, R. Dren- 
ning and David James. Mr. Hamilton is a 
member of the Presbyterian Church in re- 
ligious connection, and fraternally he belongs 
to various ^lasonic bodies. Blue Lodge No. 
313, F. & A. M., of Indiana, the Consistory 
of "Williamsport, Pa., and the Shrine at Al- 
toona, Pennsylvania. 

HARRY FLICKINC4ER is one of the most 
progressive business men of Homer City and 
his section of Indiana county. Pa., and as his 
father 's successor as merchant and undertaker 
is upholding a name which has long stood 
for solid worth in that vicinity. He was born 
in Homer City Nov. 8, 1869, and is a member 
of a family which has been settled in Pennsyl- 
vania from Provincial days. 

The Flickinger family is of Dutdi extrac- 
tion. Peter Flickinger, the founder of this 
line in America, was born in Rotterdam, Hol- 
land, Sept. 14, 1753, and there grew to man- 
hood. At the age of twenty-three years he 
left his native land for America, and made a 
location in Dauphin county. Pa. His wife's 
maiden name was Decker, and they had five 
sons: Christian, Peter, Henry, George and 
John. 

George Flickinger, son of Peter, settled in 
the Cumberland valley, in what is now Periy 
county. Pa. He lived to the age of ninety- 
three years. 

Abraham Flickinger, son of George, was 
born Feb. 6, 1804, in Perry county. Pa., 
where he grew to manhood. On April 25, 
1826, he was married there to Anna Postel- 
wait. who was born Feb. 4, 1804, daughter 
of Samuel Postelwait, of England, and in 
1836 they moved out to Indiana county. Pa., 
locating on a tract of 160 acres in Center 
township ; Mr. Flickinger erected a log house 



upon that property and settled down to farm- 
ing, continuing to devote himself to the cul- 
tivation of his land for over twenty-five j-ears. 
In 1858 he moved to Homer City, making his 
home thei-e on a tract of nineteen acres which 
he bought and on which he passed the re- 
mainder of his life. He died March 20, 1885, 
and was buried in Greenwood cemetery, at 
Indiana. Mr. Flickinger was a member of 
the Presbyterian Chureli at ilechanicsburg, 
in Brushvalley township, and in politics he 
was originally a Whig, later a Republican. 
Jlrs. Flickinger passed away Feb. 1, 1884, and 
is also buried in Greenwood cemetery. They 
liad a large family, as follows: Barbara, born 
March 6, 1828, married Jesse I\Iiekel and re- 
sides in Hancock county. 111. ; George W., born 
June 5, 1830, married Sarah A. Kurtz ; Sam- 
uel, born Feb. 18, 1832, married Eliza Z. Fee, 
of Brushvalley ; Elizabeth, born April 3, 1834, 
married Robert Loughry; Margaret Susan, 
born March 31. 1837, married Joseph Mickel; 
Christianna, born May 25, 1839, married 
Henry Miller ; John A., bom j\Iay 5, 1841, a 
Lutheran minister now located at Washing- 
ton, D. C, married Wilmina Hendrickson; 
James Simpson was born Dec. 24, 1844 ; David 
J., born Nov. 3, 1846, died in Rock Island, 111. ; 
Lewis P., born May 29, 1849, married Jennie 
Lucas and lives in Charleroi, Pennsylvania. 

James Simpson Flickinger, son of Abraham, 
born Dec. 24, 1844, attended public school in 
Center township and was reared on his 
father's farm. In March, 1865, he enlisted for 
service in the Union army, becoming a mem- 
ber of Company G, 103d Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteer Infantry, under Capt. Joseph Daugh- 
erty and Col. R. Lyman. He served four 
months, being on duty at Roanoke Island and 
Camp Palmer, N. C, where he continued un- 
til after the close of the war. Upon his re- 
turn home he went to work driving team, and 
later became engaged in carpenter work and 
contracting. In 1872 he embarked in busi- 
ness as an undertaker, and he continued to 
follow that line for a period of thirty-three 
years, until his retirement in 1906, when he 
sold out to his son Harry. Meantime he was 
also employed in the mercantile and livery 
business for fifteen .years. Mr. Flickinger ac- 
quired various interests during his active 
career, erected his own fine dwelling and 
stoi'e room, and put up a number of houses 
which he rents. Thus he has done his share 
toward the material upbuilding of the bor- 
ough, while he has also been interested in its 
government and general welfare, having 
served a.s member of the borough council and 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



as member of the school board. He is a Re- 
publican in politics. Mr. Flickinger has long 
been a member of the Presbyterian Church, in 
which he is a leading worker, having served 
as elder and Sunday school teacher. He was 
married Feb. 20, 1866, to Amanda J. Ped- 
dicord, a native of Blairsville, Indiana county, 
daughter of Richard and Hannah G. (Allison) 
Peddieord, and they have had a family of 
four children: Maud, deceased, wife of 
Charles Wagel; Harry; Edith, married to 
Joseph Clark, of Homer City ; and James Al- 
bert, who married Nell Roberts. 

Harry Flickinger, son of James S. FUck- 
inger, obtained his education in the public 
schools of Homer City. For fifteen years he 
worked along with his father, learning the 
mercantile business, and then for some time 
he was in the employ of the Joseph Wharton 
Coal & Coke Company of Coral, Pa., of which 
he became assistant superintendent. He was 
with that concern until he bought out his 
father in 1906, and during his service with 
them, and under his supervision, the company 
expended nearly one million dollars in im- 
provements and building up the property. He 
resigned when his father retired and pur- 
chased the general mercantile business the 
latter had established, as well as the under- 
taking business. Mr. Flickinger has thor- 
oughly qualified himself to conduct the lat- 
ter branch, having taken a special course in 
embalming, and he has been notably success- 
ful, being the leading undertaker in Indi- 
ana county outside of the borough of Indi- 
ana. He is a man of entei-prise and wide- 
awake ideas, is noted for his genial disposi- 
tion and friendly manners, as well as his busi- 
ness-like methods, and he has done well in the 
mercantile line, increasing his trade steadily. 
He is a director in the Homer City National 
Bank, and has served one term as burgess of 
the borough. Mr. Flickinger is independent 
in political matters, though a Republican in 
principle and a stanch admirer of Roosevelt 
and his policies. He is well and favorably 
known in local fraternal circles, belonging to 
the Masons, the Odd Fellows, "Woodmen of the 
"World and Knights of the Golden Eagle. He 
is a member of the Homer City M. E. Church 
and has served as one of its trustees for 
twenty years. In 1891 ]\Ir. Flickinger mar- 
ried Lottie Sickenberger, daughter of Henry 
Siekenberger, of Homer City, and they have 
three children. Lisle Stanley, Harry Carlton 
and "Virginia. Mrs. Flickinger is a member 
of the M. E. Church, and for a number of 
years served as organist. She is fond of mu- 



sic and of artistic temperament, and though 
devoted to her home and family enjoys social 
liCe. She is a faithful member of the Fort- 
night Club of Homer City, of which she was 
one of the organizers. 

JACOB OLIVER DeLANCEY, who is now 
living retired at his home in Plumville, In- 
diana Co., Pa., after a long and active career 
as a contractor and builder, was born in South 
Mahoning township, this county, Jlarch 14, 
1834, son of Jacob F. and Susan (Knepper) 
DeLancey. The name is of French origin, 
and the family in America was established in 
Bedford county. 

John DeLancey, the paternal grandfather 
of Jacob Oliver DeLancey, was a farmer of 
Bedford county. Pa., and there spent his en- 
tire life. 

Jacob F. DeLancey, son of John DeLan- 
cey, and father of Jacob Oliver DeLancey, was 
born in Bedford county in 1801, and about 
1832 migrated to Indiana county, settling 
on a tract of 110 acres in South Mahoning 
township, which at that time was a wilder- 
ness. Here he erected a pioneer cabin, con- 
structed of hewed logs, later built primitive 
barns, and set to work to clear and develop his 
land. A man of industry, enterprise and per- 
severance, as the years went by he succeeded 
in making his land productive, gradually 
adding improvements from time to time, until 
at the time of his death, in 1865, when he 
was sixty-four years of age, he was counted 
one of the substantial agriculturists of his 
community. He was laid to rest in the Bap- 
tist Church cemetery at Mahoning. In poli- 
tics he was originally a "Whig and later a Re- 
publican, but never sought or cared for pub- 
lic ofSce. Mr. DeLancey was married to Su- 
san Knepper, who was born in 1802, in Cam- 
bria county, Pa., daughter of Godfrey Knep- 
per, and she died on the farm of her son Jacob 
0., in 1882, and was buried beside her hus- 
band. They had the following children: 
Sarah Ann, who died young; ]\Iary Ann, who 
married Anthony Gallagher, both now de- 
ceased: Lavina, who married Phineas Run- 
yon, of Plumville ; Jacob Oliver ; John, of At- 
wood, Armstrong county; "^''illiam S., who 
died in young manhood ; Daniel J., who en- 
listed in Company F, 63d Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteer Infantry, during the Ci\'il war, was 
captured by the Confederates, after one year 
and two months' service, and died at Salisbury 
prison, of starvation ; and George, who re- 
sides at Blairsville. Pennsylvania. 

Jacob Oliver DeLaneev was educated in the 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



public schools of South Mahoning township, 
also spending one term in Glade Run acad- 
emy, and continued to reside on the home 
farm until he was twenty years of age. At 
that time he learned the trade of carpenter 
with John Moore, of Indiana, following which 
he worked for two years as a journeyman and 
then took up contract work, with his home in 
Plumcreek township, Armstrong county. 
During the eight years that followed he 
erected numerous structures in that county, 
including dwellings and schoolhouses, and the 
German Reformed and United Presbyterian 
church edifices, and also operated with gratify- 
ing success a farm of 106 acres. In 1874 he 
returned to South Mahoning township and 
continued contracting and building until 
1910, in which year he retired from business 
activity. He has made his home in Plumville 
since 1905, and has a nice residence there. 

In 1864 Mr. DeLancey enlisted in Company 
M, 5th Heavy Artillery, under Colonel Gallup, 
of Pittsburg, and Capt. John B. Alword, of 
Kittanning, and served with that organiza- 
tion until the close of the war, seeing active 
service in Virginia and Maryland, and par- 
ticipating in the defense of Washington, D. C. 
His record as a soldier shows him to have 
been faithful, brave and gallant, at all times 
ready to discharge fully the duties intrusted 
to him. He has ever been a stanch Republican, 
and while a resident of Armstrong county 
served in 1870, 1871 and 1872 as county audi- 
tor, being the only county officer elected on 
the Republican ticket. He has sei-ved as a 
member of the board of school directors, and 
was a prominent factor in the organization of 
the borough of Plumville, and in all of his 
public service has demonstrated his fitness for 
office by the conscientious regard he has had 
for his duties. For many years he has been 
superintendent of the Baptist Sunday school, 
is a member of the building committee of the 
church, and has held all the offices in the In- 
diana Baptist Association, of which he is a 
prominent member. 

On March 19, 1863, Mr. DeLancey was mar- 
ried to Sarah M. Morehead, who was born in 
Westmoreland county, Pa., daughter of Wil- 
liam Morehead, and to this union there have 
been born nine children, as follows : Preston 
F., educated in the public schools. Glade Run 
Academy, Reidsburg Academy and Lewisburg 
Tlieological Seminary, and now a minister of 
tlie Baptist Church, stationed at Meadville, 
Pa.; Clara B., who married James Franklin 
Marshall, and resides on the old homestead in 
South Mahoning township; Addison R., who 



is engaged at the carpenter's trade at Pitts- 
burg; John C, a farmer in Armstrong 
county; Carrie B., secretary and manager of 
the school furniture firm known as the Pea- 
body Supply Company; Luella, who married 
John N. Lewis, a contractor of Smicksburg, 
Pa. ; ]\Iinnie Ella, who married Clover Pierce, 
with the B. & S. Coal Company ; William F., 
a butcher, of Pittsburg; and Daniel C, man- 
ager of the Electrical Supply Company, of 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

JAMES DIXON, the "grand old man" of 
Blacklick township, is the oldest living citizen 
of that township, where his entire life of over 
ninety years has been spent. He has lived at 
his present home for sixty-eight years. He is 
a native of the township, born June 25, 1822, 
and is a notable representative of one of the 
oldest and most prominent families of south- 
ern Indiana county. The Dixons are of 
Scotch-Irish extraction. 

The first of the family to settle in Indiana 
county were Joseph and Samuel Dixon, sup- 
posedly brothers, who came from the Cumber- 
land valley in Pennsylvania, and located in 
Blacklick township, then a part of Westmore- 
land county. Their tract of land adjoined 
General Campbell's. Both participated in 
the Indian wars. Joseph Dixon was obliged 
to retreat from his land to Wallace's fort, 
and purchased or took up land adjoining the 
fort, where the rest of his life was spent, and 
where most of his children were born. They 
were: John, said to be the first white child 
born north of Blacklick, Pa., who married 
Elizabeth McQuiston, and died in 1843; Re- 
becca, who married Israel Grey; Nancy, who 
married Joseph Colbertson ; and Joseph. 

Joseph Dixon, son of Joseph, is supposed to 
have been born at or near Wallace's fort, in 
October, 1781. In 1804 he came to Blacklick 
township, and settled on the land which his 
father owned. He had a tract of 300 acres, 
which he improved and cultivated, and later 
added 200 acres to the homestead, becoming 
one of the largest land owners of his day, and 
was a well-known and respected citizen of that 
section. The remainder of his life was spent 
on his farm, where he died Feb. 24, 1853, 
aged seventy-one years, four months, ten days, 
and he was laid to rest in Hopewell cemetery. 
He was a Whig in politics. His first mar- 
riage was to Margaret Caldwell, his second to 
Mary Dixon, daughter of Samuel and Nancy 
(Dixon) Dixon. Nancy, wife of Samuel 
Dixon, was the second white woman to land 
on the west bank of Blacklick creek. The 



810 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



nhildren horn to Joseph Dixon were: Jane 
married George Dickie, of "White and Center 
townships; Nancy married Daniel Smith, of 
Center township; Samuel married Ellen 
Shields and (second) Mary McGuire; Joseph 
married Margaret Campbell and died in Bur- 
rell to-iVBship ; John died on the homestead ; 
James (born to the second marriage) is men- 
tioned below. Mrs. Mary Dixon died June 
24, 1860, aged sevent.y-two years, and was 
laid to rest in Hopewell cemetery. She was 
a member of Hopewell I\I. E. Church. 

James Dixon spent his boyhood days on the 
homestead. He attended the little log school- 
house located in Dixon district, and contin- 
ued to make his home on the homestead with 
his parents until he came of age. Then he 
started to make his own way. He worked on 
a near-by farm for one year, and in 1844 lo- 
cated at his present place, a tract of 212 
acres, where he has made his home for the 
last sixty-eight years. During the gi-eater 
part of that period he has given most of his 
time to agricultural pursuits, cultivating and 
improving his homestead, to which he has 
added other land. For the last twenty years 
he has lived retired from active labor. Now 
in his declining days he is tenderly eared for 
by his daughters. Although past fourscore 
and ten .years he is still active in mind and 
body, retaining all his faculties except his 
hearing, and takes a deep interest in all the 
doings of the day as well as his own business 
affairs. He is a man of strong convictions, 
and possesses an indomitable will, and when 
he considers himself in the right will fight to 
the end against any obstacles. He is imbued 
with the spirit of the strong Scotch-Irish race 
which has been such a potent factor for good 
in the development of this country and her 
institutions. In politics he was originally a 
Democrat, casting his first Presidential vote 
for James K. Polk, and he has never missed a 
Presidential election since. Since the days 
of Lincoln he has supported the Republi- 
can candidates down to and including Wil- 
liam H. Taft. The only public office he ever 
held was that of township assessor. Mr. Dixon 
has been a lifelong member of Blaekliek M. 
E. Church, and was one of the organizers of 
the first church of that denomination, in the 
town of Blaekliek, being now the last survivor 
of that zealous company. He served the 
church as member of the building committee, 
Sunday school teacher, and later superintend- 
ent of the Sunday school. No resident of 
Blaekliek township is more highly respected 
than ]\Ir. Dixon. He has lived to see many 



changes in that region, most of them for the 
betterment of social conditions, and during 
his long life has witnessed remarkable prog- 
ress in every line of human endeavor as well 
as in agricultural work, where his chief in- 
terest lay. 

In 1843 Jlr. Dixon married Mary Earhart, 
who was born Oct. 27, 1823, in Blaekliek 
township, daughter of William and I\Iary C. 
(Keener) Earhart, and died Nov. 1, 1899, 
after a married life of about fifty-five years. 
She was interred in Blairsville cemetery. Mrs. 
Dixon was a member of Hopewell M. E. 
Church and a true Christian in all the rela- 
tions of life, noted for her goodness and 
charity. Twelve children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Dixon: Mary Catherine married 
John Le^vis, of Jacksonville, Pa. ; Nancy died 
in infancy; Elizabeth died in infancy; Clara 
died in infancy; Annie E. resides at home 
with her father; William E. is engaged in the 
meat business at Coke^^lle, Pa. ; Isaac Newton 
resides at Latrobe, Pa., where he holds the 
office of county poor director; Joseph Harry 
died after reaching maturitj' ; Samuel Ed- 
ward died &fter reaching manhood ; Charles 
resides with his father; Hettie L., now at 
home, was married and had two childi-en. 
Hazel, who died when four years old, and 
Charles, who is now studying at the State 
normal school at Indiana, Pa. ; Emma died 
when j^oung. 

REV. GEORGE HILL. D. D., deceased. 
In the death of Rev. Dr. Hill Blairsville lost a 
most beloved citizen. Tliere for sixty years or 
more he had made his home, during that period 
being minister of the Presbyterian Church, 
and he was the founder of the Blairsville 
Female Seminary, an institution well known 
throughout Western Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Hill was a native of Pennsylvania, h)orn 
in the Ligonier valley, in Westmoreland 
county, Sept. 18, 1815. His grandfather. Rev. 
George Hill, was a native of York county. Pa., 
born March 13. 1764, and at the close of the 
Revolutionary war the family moved from 
their home in York county to locate in Fayette 
county. Pa., where Rev. GeDrge Hill entered 
upon the duties of his first pastorate. He 
was educated at Princeton, and was licensed 
to preach Dee. 22. 1791. The following year 
he was installed as pastor of Fairfield, Done- 
gal and Wheatfield Congregations, which he 
continued to serve for a period of six years. 
On April 11. 1798, he resigned the charge at 
Wheatfield and accepted the call to Ligoniei-, 
where he administered to the spiritual wants 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



811 



of his people for upward of a quarter of a 
century. He died there June 9, 1822, and 
was buried in Fairfield cemeteiy. He was a 
man well known, and respected for his many 
virtues. His wife, Elizabeth McClelland, was 
a native of Fayette county, Pennsylvania. 

John Hill, son of Rev. George and Eliza- 
beth CMeClelland) Hill, was born March 20, 
1790, in Fayette county. He made his home 
in Westmoreland, whei-e he became a leading 
citizen, serving the county well as representa- 
tive in both branches of the State Legisla- 
tui-e, having served as member of the State 
Senate for several terms as well as in the lower 
house. During the war of 1812 he commanded 
a company of troops under Gen. William H. 
Harrison. He was a stanch Democrat, and a 
firm believer in the doctrines of his party. 
He died at Fairfield, in Westmoreland county, 
Aug. 22, 1856, and is buried in Fairfield ceme- 
tery. Mr. Hill was a member of the Presby- 
terian Church. He married in Derry town- 
ship, Westmoreland county, Jane Moorhead, 
a native of Derry township, born June 30, 
1795, who died Dee. 18, 1854, and was buried 
in Fairfield cemetery. She was an intelligent 
woman and a devoted mother. 

Rev. Dr. George Hill, son of Hon. John and 
Jane (Moorhead) Hill, began his education in 
the schools of his native county, and later grad- 
uated from Jefiferson College, Canonsburg, Pa., 
in the class of 1837. He then took up the 
stud.y of theology in the Western Theological 
Seminary, Allegheny, graduating in 1840. 
He was invited to preach at Blairsville and 
Salem, and accepting in 1841 was ordained 
and installed by the Presbytery of Blairs- 
ville as co-pastor with Rev. Thomas Davis, who 
died May 28, 1848. In October of the latter 
year Dr. Hill was released from Salem to give 
all his time and attention to the church at 
Blairsville, to which he devoted himself for a 
period of fift.v-four years. Then, in 1882, 
Rev. J. W. Criswell was called as co-pastor. 
On June 8-11, 1890, the church celebrated the 
semi-centennial of the pastorate of Rev. Dr. 
Hill, the celebration continuing for three days. 
During the time that Dr. Hill was pastor of 
the church upward of twelve hundred mem- 
bers were received. In recognition of his 
faithful services in the ministry Washington 
and Jefferson College in 1869 conferred Bpon 
him the degree of D. D. In 1883 he was 
elected president of the board of directors of 
the Western Theological Seminary, which he 
had served as director from 1847, and he was 
elected first vice president in 1870. In 1861 
he was elected moderator of the Presb3'terian 



Synod of Pittsburg. In 1851 Dr. Hill 
founded Blairsville Female Seminary, which 
for the last sixty years has done excellent serv- 
ice in the cause of Christian education. Dr. 
Hill was a man of broad intellect, progres- 
sive, a forceful preacher of the gospel, a true 
Christian in every sense of the word. He 
died at his home in Blairsville Aug. 2, 1895. 

Dr. Hill was twice married. On Sept. 21, 
1841, he married Harriet Lewis, daughter of 
Rev. David Lewis, pastor of Ebeuezer Presby- 
terian Church, and she died Nov. 3, 1852, the 
mother of four children, namely: Harriet; 
Sarah, who married I. W. Mitchell; and two 
who died young. Dr. Hill married for his 
second wife, on March 23, 1854, Abigail 
Hawes, of Boston, Mass., and to this union 
three children were born: Abigail Grace, 
who married Rev. A. C. Brown; George H., 
who is a minister of the Presbyterian Church 
at Beechwood; and Helen, wife of Frank B. 
Andre. 

Dr. Hill was a stanch advocate of temper- 
ance and voted the Prohibition ticket for 
many years, and was a strong supporter of 
the cause. Mrs. Hill, who is still living, is 
noted for her many acts of charity and Chris- 
tian virtues. 

PETER FRECH, ex-county commissioner 
of Indiana county, and a retired farmer of 
Georgeville, was born on the Rhine, in Prus- 
sia, Germauv, Nov. 24, 1842, son of Peter 
Freeh. 

Peter Freeh, the father, was born on the 
Rhine, in Prussia, Dec. 25, 1810, and there 
married Anna Mary Jaeoby. A wheelwright 
by trade, he followed that calling, but as his 
family increased he felt that there were not 
enough opportunities in his native land, so 
left Germany in 1847 and came to America, 
making the vo.vage in a sailing vessel. Owing 
to the fact that this was an old ship, an acci- 
dent the first day compelled the captain to 
return to land for repairs, so that the journey 
consumed five weeks. Eventually the little 
party landed at Philadelphia, Pa., in July, 
1847, and proceeded to Indiana county. Pa., 
where the Freehs had a relative. She lived in 
Ra.yne township, not far from Dixonville. 
They located on 126 acres of land, which they 
bought for $300, and built a log cabin. The 
propert.y was in the midst of heavy timber, 
and it was hard work to clear off the land, 
so in 1855 this farm was sold, and another 
was purchased near Kelleysburg, containing 
135 acres. On this place the father built a 
frame house and substantial barn and made 



812 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



other improvements, so as to bring his prop- 
erty into a good state. He died upon the farm 
of his daughter, ]\Irs. Stormer, Oct. 1, 1882, 
aged nearly seventy-two years, and is buried 
in Grove Chapel cemetery. He was a con- 
sistent member of the Lutheran Church, of 
which he was deacon and elder. His wife 
died in April, 1882, and is buried by his side ; 
she also was a Lutheran. Mr. Freeh was a 
Lincoln Republican, but later became a Demo- 
crat. He was a man who always commanded 
universal respect. The children born to him 
and his wife were; Catherine, widow of 
Charles Stormer, now residing in Indiana, 
Pa. ; Peter ; George, who lives on the old home- 
stead in Rayne township ; Mary Elizabeth, 
widow of John Lemp ; and John, who is a 
farmer of Rayne township. 

Peter Freeh was only four and a half years 
old at the time of the family immigration, and 
could not speak English when they settled in 
Rayne township. He had to walk three miles 
to get to school, but in spite of his disadvan- 
tages learned English and at the same time 
made himself useful on the farm, remaining 
at home until he was twenty-four years old. 
At that time he settled on ninety -two acres in 
Rayne township, fifteen acres of which were 
improved. After four years of hard work 
upon this property he sold it at a profit, and 
then went to North Mahoning township, one 
mile east of Georgeville, and bought 200 acres 
known as the John Knight farm. With the 
possession of this fann came his opportunity 
to develop into a successful agriculturist, and 
he made good use of it, improving his prop- 
ei-ty in every way, until he had one of the best 
farms in his township. He continued to oper- 
ate this land until 1899, when he sold sixty 
acres, now owning 140 acres, and moved to 
Georgeville ; he oversees the farming of his 
land, his son being in charge. 

During the Civil war Mr. Freeh gave prac- 
tical demonstration of his feeling for his 
adopted country by enlisting in August, 1862, 
in Company I,* 135th Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, under Capt. J. A. Kinter and Col. 
James R. Porter. He served nine months, 
and was honorably discharged at the close of 
his enlistment, in June, 1863. Still feeling 
that he ought to give further service, he re- 
enlisted in March, 1865, in Company F, 74th 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, upder Capt. 
John kinter and Colonel Holorger. Promoted 
to second sergeant, he continued to serve as 
such, and was discharged Aug. 27, 1865, at 
Clarksburg, "W. Va., where he had been sta- 
tioned, once more returning home with the 



record of having acquitted himself bravely 
and gallantly. 

In 1899 i\Ir. Freeh was elected county com- 
missioner, the other members of the board be- 
ing James K. Dick and Thomas P. Stevens, 
and served for one tei-m of three years, dur- 
ing which period several bridges were built 
and extensive improvements made on the 
courthouse. He is a Democrat, and was school 
director for ten years in North Mahoning, and 
for two and a half years held the same office 
in the independent district of Georgeville. 
He has also been on the election board as in- 
spector, and has been collector of taxes, in 
every way proving himself efficient and public- 
spirited, a man of force of character and 
strength of purpose. The Lutheran Church 
of Trade City holds his membership, and he 
has served it as elder for many years, being 
very active in the good work of his denomina- 
tion. The G. A. R. post of Punxsutawney has 
in him an enthusiastic member. 

In addition to his farming interests, Mr. 
Freeh has been quite prominent as a breeder 
of fine horses, having owned the trotting mare 
Bell Onward, and now owns Onward Higgi- 
son, which he raised. 

On May 2, 1867, Mr. Freeh was married to 
Rebecca Kimple, of Rayne township, a daugh- 
ter of John and Mary (Sigler) Kimple, old 
settlers of Indiana county, and people of 
prominence in their day. She died Jan. 11, 
1913, and is buried at Gilgal Church. Mrs. 
Freeh was also a member of the Lutheran 
Church, seconding her husband's efforts in 
the advancement of its interests. Mr. and 
Mrs. Freeh had children as follows: IMary 
Lavina, who married C. M. Wortman, pro- 
prietor of the "Clawson House," of Indiana, 
Pa. ; twins, a son and a daughter, who died in 
infancy ; George, who is at home ; and Annie 
A., who married Fred Jamison, of "Washing- 
ton, Pa., and has a daughter, Mary Jane. 

ilr. Freeh has attained all his prosperity 
through natural ability and a willingness to 
work. No labor was too hard for him, and he 
always saved his money, so that when oppor- 
tunity offered he was able to invest wisely and 
profitably. 

JAMES G. FISHER, M. D., of Indiana, 
has but recently settled in that borough, com- 
ing from Rossiter, Indiana county, where he 
had been in practice for several years. He 
was born April 16, 1875, at Pluraville, this 
county, son of Samuel R. and Maria (Mc- 
Gaugiiey) Fisher. 

Samuel R. Fisher was born and reared in 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



813 



"Westmoreland county, Pa., and followed farm- 
ing. His death occurred in January, 1911. 
He was a prominent and active member of the 
Baptist Church. Nine children were bom to 
him and his wife: Two died in infancy, the 
survivors being Josiah, Miles, John, Mary, 
Charles, EfiSe (wife of Samuel Buchanan) and 
James G. 

James G. Fisher attended the common 
schools in Mahoning township and the borough 
of Indiana, and then took a course at the State 
normal school at Indiana, graduating in 1899. 
He then (1899) went to St. Louis and there 
took charge of the geological survey under 
Professor Thompson, following this work for 
a period of four years. Entering the medical 
department of George Washington University 
at Washington, D. C, he was graduated from 
that institution in 1904, after which he spent 
about one year traveling in the South, being 
mainly at St. Louis, BIo. He began the prac- 
tice of his profession at Dixonville, Indiana 
Co., Pa., in February, 1905, remaining there 
until October of the same year, when he re- 
moved to Rossiter, having become physician 
for the Clearfield Bituminous Coal Company 
at that point. In addition to his work in that 
capacity he attended to a large private prac- 
tice, having established a reputation for skill 
and devotion to his patients which drew a 
large patronage. Perhaps few physicians of 
his years and length of practice have exceeded 
his success and popularity, and he gained a 
variety of experience which cannot fail to 
prove valuable to him in the coming years. 
He remained at Rossiter until March 1, 1912, 
when he changed his location to Indiana, the 
wider field appealing to one of his ambition. 
He is a hard worker, conscientious and untir- 
ing, and has every prospect of a very active 
and useful career. He is a member of the 
Medical Society of Indiana county, the Penn- 
sylvania State Medical Society and the Ameri- 
can Medical Association. 

On April 5, 1905, Dr. Fisher married Amy 
Frothingham Kane, daughter of Rear Admiral 
James I. Kane, U. S. N., retired, of New 
York. They have had four children : George, 
Samuel, John (deceased) and Peter Wright. 

RAY McKELVY ALEXANDER, M. D., 
practicing physician in West Wheatfield town- 
ship, Indiana county, with office at Garfield, 
was born May 7, 1879, in that township, son 
of William and Margaret (Liggett) Alex- 
ander. 

William Alexander, the paternal grand- 
father of Dr. Alexander, was bom in 1793 in 



Ireland, and came to the United States with 
his parents when he was two years old. The 
family first settled^ at Philadelphia, where the 
father, a carpenter by trade, met an acciden- 
tal death, falling from 'a building, and the 
family subsequently moved to West Wheat- 
field township and settled on a 200-acre farm, 
this property now being owned by the Lynn 
heirs. William Alexander followed the trade 
of stonemason, and became well and favorably 
known in his community. He was a faithful 
member of the United Presbyterian Church, 
in the faith of which he died in 1880, in West 
Wheatfield. His wife, Martha Jamison, was 
born in Scotland, and died in West Wheat- 
field township, and both were buried in the 
United Presbyterian cemetery there. They 
had the following children: Margaret mar- 
ried Thompson Lynn ; Elizabeth married Wil- 
liam Crawford; Jane married Rev. D. Reed; 
Mary was married to William Hutchinson; 
Moses died at the age of thirty years; Jami- 
son died in infancy ; William was the father of 
Dr. Alexander. 

William Alexander, son of William, was 
born Feb. 25, 1834, in West Wheatfield town- 
ship, and there attended public school and 
worked with his parents until he was twenty- 
one years of age. At that time he purchased 
a farm of 100 acres, on which he resided for 
one year, when he sold out and moved to 
Chei-ryhill township, where he remained for 
five years, cultivating a tract of 105 acres. 
On his return to West Wheatfield township 
he bought the Reed farm of 153 acres, and 
there built a large house and barn and took 
up farming, but later this house was torn down 
to make room for the right-of-way of the 
Pennsylvania railroad, and Mr. Alexander 
erected the substantial residence which is still 
occupied by his widow, son and daughters. 
He was a member, elder and trustee of the 
New Florence United Presbyterian Church, 
and served on its building committee, and 
also acted as school director. He was origi- 
nally a Whig and subsequently adopted the 
views of the Republican party. A man of 
temperance and probity, he led an honest. 
God-fearing life, and when he died, Sept. 23, 
1907, the community felt the loss of one of 
its best and most highly respectfed citizens. 
Mr. Alexander was married Jau. 11, 1859, to 
Margaret Liggett, who was born July 29, 1838, 
and is now living with her son on the home- 
stead. They had the following children: 
Mary, born Oct. 7, 1859, died June 24, 1860 ; 
Elmer Ellsworth, born July 23, 1862, mar- 
ried Mary Vinnie Vance, May 21, 1890, resides 



814 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



at Ii-wiu, Pa., and is employed on the Penn- 
sylvania railroad; Martha Elizabeth, born 
Jan. 31, 1865, married Anderson Fowler, May 
6, 1891, and has one child, Clyde Alexander; 
Samuel L., born Jan. 18, 1867, is unmarried 
and conducts the homestead farm ; William J.. 
born :\Iareh 3, 1869, died Sept. 2, 1870 ; Mag- 
gie Wilhelmina, born July 16, 1871, married 
Oct. 31, 1905, Harry W. Wakefield ; Julia A., 
born Feb. 14, 1874, and Lulu M., born Dec. 
4, 1876, are both unmarried and residing with 
their mother on the old homestead; and Ray 
M. is the youngest of the family. 

Ray ilcKelvy Alexander attended Indiana 
public school No. 9, and then went to the New 
Florence school, following which he took in- 
struction under Prof. J. T. Stewart at Ar- 
magh and Prof. C. A. Campbell. At the age 
of sixteen years he commenced to teach, at 
which calling he was engaged for three years 
in West Wheatfield township and two years 
in Derry township, as well as one year in 
New Florence. At that time he went to Pitts- 
burg and there entered the University, from 
which he was graduated in 1905 with the de- 
gree of doctor of medicine, and immediately 
located in West Wheatfield townsliip. He has 
built up a practice that extends throughout 
this part of the county as well as into West- 
moreland County, and is known as a skilled, 
able and sympathetic physician. His reputa- 
tion is high among his professional colleagues, 
as one who recognizes and respects the un- 
written ethics of the profession. 

On Feb. 24, 1909, Dr. Alexander was mar- 
ried to Essie DuShaue, daughter of Joseph 
and Addie (Eberhardt) DuShane, and grand- 
daughter of Andrew DuShane, who was a 
blacksmith and pioneer settler of Westmore- 
land county, where he had his home near Boli- 
var. Dr. and Mrs. Alexander have one daugh- 
ter, Margaret DuShane. 

Dr. Alexander was made a member of the 
National Geographic Society Feb. 9, 1910, 
and also belongs to the Alumni Association 
of the University of Pittsburg, the grand 
chapter of the Phi Chi fraternity, the Com- 
monwealth of Pennsylvania Department of 
Public Instruction and the State of Pennsyl- 
vania Board of Health. Fraternally he is 
connected with the ilasons (holding member- 
ship in Acacia Lodge, No. 355, Blair-sville, 
Pa.), the Royal Arcanum and the Knights of 
the ]\Iaecabees. His well-appointed offices arc 
situated at Garfield, with postoffice at Robin- 



son, while he makes his home at Bolivar, in 
Westmoreland county. 

JAMES C. DA\aSON, contractor and 
builder, of Clymer, Indiana county, is one of 
the leading citizens of that borough, being 
prominent in its public life as well as in busi- 
ness. He is a justice of the peace and notary, 
and is at present serving as president of the 
boroiigh council, ilr. Davison was liorn June 
13, 1851, in Blair county. Pa., and is a son 
of John Armstrong and Ellen (Dunlap) Davi- 
son. 

John Armstrong Davison, his great-grand- 
father, was born in Scotland and from that 
country went first to Ireland, settling in Ty- 
rone, where he was interested in the great 
iron industries of that region. He came to 
America some time during ^he eighteenth 
century and passed the remainder of his life 
in Maryland, engaging in the iron industry 
throughout his residence there. During the 
Revolution he raised a militia company in 
Marj'land, of which he became captain, serv- 
ing as such under General Washington. 

John Armstrong Davison, the second of that 
name in this country, was born in ^Maryland. 
Like his father he carried on business as an 
ironmaster. He served in the war of 1812. 

John Armsti-ong Davison, son of John Arm- 
strong Davison 2d, was born in the State of 
Delaware. He, too, became associated with 
the iron business, being a machinist and ax- 
maker. When a young man he came to Penn- 
sylvania, settling in Blair county, where he 
spent the rest of his days. In his later years 
he purchased a farm and engaged in agi-i- 
cultural pursuits. He married Ellen Dun- 
lap, who was born in Pennsylvania and be- 
longed to a family which came originally 
from Ireland, and they had nine children, 
namely : John Armstrong, who lives in Ty- 
rone, Pa. (he served a short time during the 
Civil war) ; Mary, wife of Major Bell, who 
served as a major during the Civil war (both 
are now deceased) ; Martha, wife of George 
Traister, who served during the Civil war 
(both are deceased); Elizabeth, deceased; 
Sarah, widow of Daniel Wesley, residing at 
Tyrone. Pa. ; Emily, Mrs. Van Scoyoc. of Ty- 
rone; Capt. George C, now living at Tyrone, 
who served throughout the Civil war, in which 
he held the rank of captain ; Robert, deceased, 
who served during the Civil war in the 7th 
Pennsylvania Cavalry and was under Gen- 
eral Sherman; and James C. 

James C. Davison passed his early days in 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



815 



Blair county, where he attended school. At 
the age of seventeen he went to Philipsburg, 
Center Co., Pa., where he learned the car- 
penter's trade, remaining there for about 
four years. After that he traveled over Penn- 
sylvania for a time, working at his trade, and 
for a time was located in Clearfield county, en- 
gaged in contracting. Leaving that county he 
returned to Tyrone, Blair county, where he 
remained for a period of five years, when the 
town of Clymer, in Indiana county, was 
started coming to that place. There he has 
since carried on a most successful business 
as a conti'actor and builder, also including 
the lines of heating and plumbing. He has 
put up many residences and business struc- 
tures in the borough and has built up a sub- 
stantial custom, his thoroughly reliable work, 
good management and up-to-date ideas gain- 
ing him many patrons who appreciate the 
advantages of first-class work. 

When the borough was organized Mr. Davi- 
son had his share in the initial work, and he 
has continued his interest in its good govern- 
ment and development to the present time. 
He is now serving as president of the coun- 
cil, is a member of the Board of Trade, and 
is also acting as justice of the peace, to which 
office he was elected three years ago. He is 
also a prominent church worker, he and his 
wife belonging to the IMethodist Church, and 
he is holding the presidency of the commit- 
tee board. Mr. Davison was formerly a 
member of the F. & A. M. and the I. 0. 0. F. 
On Jan. 12, 1872, Mr. Davison was married 
to Martha E. Strong, a native of Clearfield 
county, Pa., born Sept. 2, 1855, daughter of 
Thomas and Elizabeth (Caldwell) Strong, 
both of whom were natives of Clearfield coun- 
ty, and both are now deceased. Mr. Strong 
was extensively engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness. His family consisted of eight children: 
Joseph A., the eldest, who lives in Clearfield 
county. Pa. ; Martha E., late wife of James 
C. Davison ; Mary, widow of Harvey H. Swan, 
living in Clearfield county; William C, a 
merchant of Clymer; Charles S., who has a 
meat market in Clearfield; Harvey L., also of 
Clearfield county; Calvin V., a farmer on 
the old homestead in that county ; and Edith, 
a professional nurse, who is in Tennessee. 

Mrs. Davison died March 1, 1909. She was 
the mother of eight children: Avouia, who 
is the wife of Harry L. Witherell, a farmer 
of Clearfield county, and has three children, 
Amy, Henry and Paul; Clyde, residing at 
home; Harvey A., who is a teacher in Indi- 
ana county; Willard F., a carpenter, at home ; 



Walter, who is in the emplo.y of T. C. Stan- 
ley at Clymer; Lula, wife of Robert G. Wil- 
liams, of Ernest, this county (they have four 
children, Beatrice, Hobart, Ruth and Bar- 
nice) ; Russell, at home; and James. 

LEVI YOUNG, late of Indiana, passed his 
latter years in retirement in that borough. He 
was born at Morrisons Cove, Bedford Co., Pa., 
Dee. 29, 1820, son of James and Catherine 
(Metz) Young, both of whom died in Bed- 
ford county. He was a charcoal burner by 
occupation. They had five children : Henry, 
Andrew, Peggj', Harriet and Levi. After the 
father's death the mother became the wife of 
James Kirkland, an Englishman, and in 1835 
the family moved to Indiana borough, set- 
tling in White township, where they followed 
farming. 

Levi Young was given a good education and 
taught- for a time in the old subscription 
schools. At the age of seventeen he became 
clerk in the store of James MeCannon, at the 
corner of Sixth and Philadelphia streets, In- 
diana, where ]\Ir. William R. Loughry is now 
established. After his marriage he and his 
wife moved onto the farm of her uncle, Alex- 
ander Bartley, in Conemaugh township, In- 
diana county, and later bought that place, 
farming it for seven years in all. Selling this 
property, they removed to the farm of Rev. 
Mr. Lewis, in the same township, upon which 
they remained four years, and then bought the 
Turner farm in Center township, Indiana 
county, a large and valuable property of 272 
acres, improved and with good buildings. 
They made their home there for twenty-five 
years, at the end of which time they sold .it 
to a Mr. Cajupbell, and then bought the Judge 
Clark farm at the edge of Indiana borough. 
They lived there for the next seven years, sell- 
ing "that property to j\Ir. Bath, and in April, 
1890, moved into the borough of Indiana. 
There Mr. Young continued to reside until 
his death, which occurred in 1907. He was a 
man of the highest standing and one of the 
venerable citizens of the place. In politics 
he was a Democrat, and in religion adhered 
to the M. E. Church. 

On July 4, 1842, at Greensburg, Pa., Mr. 
Young married Jane Dixon, who was born 
Dec. 12, 1824, in Blacklick township, Indiana 
county, daughter of Thomas and Jane (Bart- 
ley) Dixon. Though advanced in age she 
still reads the daily paper and is very active. 
Nine children were born to this union: Al- 
bert, who died of fever in a Rebel camp while 
serving in the army; Margaret Ellen, Mrs. 



816 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Harrison Kauffman, of Indiana; Frank, of 
Chicago; Nancy Jane, Mrs. William Gilmer, 
of Blairsville; Clara, Mrs. Benson Lewis, of 
Chicago; George, M. D., of Evansville, Ind. ; 
Ella, Mi-s. Alexander Graham, of Conemaugh 
township; Lizzie, Mrs. George Ray, of Arm- 
strong township, this county; and Foster 
Bartley, now living in Canada, where he has 
taken up a homestead. 

JAMES BOTHEL, the oldest living resi- 
dent of Center township, Indiana county, has 
been settled at his present home there for a 
period of forty years and is a highly esteemed 
citizen of his neighborhood. He was born in 
Armstrong township, this county, Oct. 8, 
1822, son of John and Mary (MeCrea) Bethel, 
the latter a native of Wilmington, Del. John 
Bothel was drowned in the Allegheny river. 

Mr. Bothel followed farming throughout 
his active years. After living in Washington 
township, Indiana county, for a time, he 
came to Center township, in 1872, locating on 
the David Fleming farm, a tract of 112 acres 
where he has since continuously made his 
home. He retired some years ago from ar- 
duous labor, the farm being now cared for 
by his son Nelson M. Bothel, with whom he 
makes his home. But though past ninety Mr. 
Bothel retains all his faculties, and he has a 
remarkable memory. During the Civil war, 
though past the age limit, he offered his ser- 
vices in behalf of the Union cause, in 1862 en- 
listing in Company I, 135th Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, under Capt. Andrew Kin- 
ter and Colonel Porter. He served nine 
months, twenty days, and took part in numer- 
ous engagements, among them the battle of 
Chancellorsville. He has been a stanch Re- 
publican since the party was founded, always 
upholding its principles, and is a great ad- 
mirer of Roosevelt. In religious connection 
he is a member of the United Presbyterian 
Church, which he has served as trustee. 

On Jan. 12, 1865, Mr. Bothel married Mrs. 
Mary J. Campbell Dickson, who was born in 
Westmoreland county, Pa., near New Alex- 
andria, and was the widow of John Dickson. 
She had two children by her first marriage, 
Sarah and Samuel. To her marriage with 
Mr. Bothel were also born two children. Nel- 
son McCrea and Edith (married to William 
Anthony). Mrs. Bothel died Jan. 14, 1909, 
and was buried in Greenwood cemetery at 
Indiana. She was a member of the Crete 
United Presbvterian Church. 

Nflson McCrea Bothfl, onlv son of James 
Bothel, was bom June 25, 1867, in Washing- 



ton township, Indiana Co., Pa., and there 
passed his early years. He has been a farmer 
all his active life, and after commencing on 
his own account lived and farmed in Arm- 
strong township, this county, for a period of 
sixteen years, owning sixty-five acres there. 
In 1908 he returned to his father's farm in 
Center township, where he is now successfully 
engaged in farming and stock raising. 

Like his father Mr. Bothel has always been 
a Republican in his political principles, but 
is independent when it comes to choosing can- 
didates for any office. While living in Arm- 
strong township he served his fellow citizens 
for six years in the office of school director, 
and was secretary of the board during that 
time. He is particularly interested in church 
work, being a leading member of the United 
Presbyterian Church, which he has served in 
an official capaeitj^ for many yeai-s, having 
been elder, trustee, Sunday school teacher and 
superintendent. 

Mr. Bothel was married in December, 1890, 
to Lottie Carnahan, of Armstrong township, 
this county, daughter of David and Levenia 
(Berkebile) Carnahan, and four children were 
born to them: Florence (who is now the 
wife of William Anthony, and has one daugh- 
ter, Edith M.), Esther, Lavinia and Bessie. 
Mrs. Bothel died Jan. 13, 1906, and is buried 
in Greenwood cemetery, at Indiana. 

EDWARD M. ANSLEY, county commis- 
sioner of Indiana county, lives in Rayne 
township on the farm where he was bom and 
which was bought by his father in 1854. 

John Ansley, his great-grandfather, served 
as a soldier in the American army during the 
Revolutionary war, and his brother com- 
manded a company in the British army. John 
Ansley came from New Jersey to Westmore- 
land county, Pa., in the early days of the set- 
tlement of that region. He was a farmer by 
occupation. 

Daniel Ansley, son of John, was born in 
Westmoreland county in 1798, and followed 
farming there until 1837, when he removed to 
Indiana county. He died in 1858, at the age 
of sixty. 

James Ansley, son of Daniel, was bom in 
1825 and died Feb. 23, 1895. He was a far- 
mer throughout his active years, being ex- 
tensively engaged in general agriculture and 
stock raising in Rayne township, and was not 
only a successful business man of his locality 
but also active in public life, serving as jus- 
tice of the peace of his township and as audi- 
tor of Indiana county. He was a Republican 



HISTOEY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



817 



in political sentiment. He married Sarah 
Spencer, who was born near Johnstown, in 
Cambria county, and she survived him, pass- 
ing away April 13, 1909. Mr. and Mrs. Ans- 
ley were membere of the Baptist Church, 
which Mr. Ansley served ofScially for many 
years in the capacity of deacon. He was a 
pi'ominent member of the Masonic fraternity. 
Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
James Ansley: Louisa, who married J. F. 
McLaughlin, and is now deceased; William 
B., a physician ; and Edward M. 

Edward M. Ansley was bom Feb. 20, 1858, 
and attended the local public schools in his 
early boyhood, later going to the Reidsburg 
Academy, in Clarion county. Some time after 
he commenced to work he became a traveling 
salesman for a Avholesale shoe house of New 
York and Philadelphia and was thus engaged 
continuously for a period of thirty-one years, 
becoming one of the expert salesmen in his 
line while he remained on the I'oad. In fact, 
his long connection with the one concern is 
sufficient evidence of the value of his services. 
After his father's death, in 1895, he managed 
the home farm in addition to looking after his 
interests as salesman. 

Mr. Ansley has long been connected with 
public affairs. He served his township as 
school director for twelve consecutive years, 
and for three years was chairman of the 
county convention of school directors. In 
November, 1911, he was elected on the Repub- 
lican ticket to the office of county commissioner 
by the largest majority received by any man 
on the county ticket, and he assumed the 
duties of the office in January, 1912. His 
popularity has been well deserved, for he has 
given satisfaction in every position to which 
he has been chosen. Like his father he is a 
prominent member of the Baptist Church, of 
which he has been a deacon for more than 
fifteen years. 

In March, 1888, Mr. Ansley was married to 
Ella M. Chambers, daughter of James Cham- 
bei-s, of Library, Allegheny Co., Pa. On her 
mother's side she is related to the Philips 
family, one of the noted families of Allegheny 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Ansley have had three 
children, namely : Arthur B. ; Edward W., 
who died when one year old ; and Paul Ansley. 

MATHEWS. One of the oldest settled 
families in East Wheatfield township, Indiana 
county, is that of Mathews, which is of Irish 
extraction and has lived in Pennsylvania since 



a few years after the close of the Revolution- 
ary war. 

William Mathews, the first of the line in this 
State, was a native of Ireland and there mar- 
ried Martha McLain. In the early part of 
1786 the family crossed the Atlantic, coming 
to Pennsylvania and first locating in Somer- 
set county, where they remained for six years. 
In 1792 they moved to Westmoreland county, 
making a home in Fairfield township where 
Mr. Mathews passed the rest of his life, fol- 
lowing farming. He died between 1812 and 
1814, his wife a few years later. Their chil- 
dren were as follows: Mary, who married 
Matthew Ray; William, who married Eliza- 
beth Snodgrass; Archibald; James, who mar- 
ried Nancy Hammill; Jane, who married 
James Lemon; Sarah, who married Thomas 
Trimble; Margaret, who married Archibald 
Johnson ; Samuel, who married Mary Pollock ; 
Ann, who married John Nesbett; John, who 
married Nancy Trimble; and Martha, who 
married Hugh Knox. 

Archibald Mathews, son of William, was 
born in 1784 in Ireland and was two years 
old when brought to America. He passed his 
first years here in Somerset county, coming 
with the family to what was then Westmore- 
land county, and received such education as 
the subscription schools of the day afforded. 
But there were few in this section, and his 
assistance with the farm work was necessary. 
When he settled in what is now East Wheat- 
field township, Indiana county, he located on 
the farm of George Findley, the first white 
settler in the county. Mr. Mathews was a man 
of advanced ideas for his time, and he had the 
enterprise to carry out his projects. Thus 
he was the first in the county to erect a woolen 
factory, which stood near the Baker furnace. 
He spent the remainder of his life in the 
township, engaged in farming on the Findley 
place as well as manufacturing and milling, 
and died in 1851, at the age of sixty-seven. 
He is buried on the farm, in the family lot re- 
served for burial purposes. Mr. Mathews was 
an elder in the Presbyterian Church. On 
June 12, 1806, he married Elizabeth Findley, 
who was born Jan. 28, 1784, at Hagerstown, 
Md., daughter of George Findley, of whom a 
complete account may be found elsewhere. 
She survived him many years, dying in 1881, 
at the advanced age of ninety-seven. Like her 
husband she was a member of the Presby- 
terian Church. They had a family of eleven 
children, namely : Jane, born April 26, 1807, 
married Dec. 22, 1827, Thomas Chapman, and 



818 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



died Feb. 10, 1828 ; Martha, born Jan. 9, 1809, 
married Feb. 14, 1834, Isaac Rogers ; Isabella, 
born Jan. 24, 1812, married July 23, 1838, 
William Lapsley; Eliza, born in 1814, mar- 
ried May 19, 1836, Joseph Kennedy; George 
Findlev was born Aug. 19, 1815 ; ]Man' Ann, 
born Nov. 22, 1817, married April 23, 1840, 
James Taylor, and died Jan. 14, 1843 ; Sarah, 
born April 8, 1820, married Feb. 10, 1842, 
Samuel Noble, and died Oct. 11, 1846; Wil- 
liam and Archibald, twins, were born Aug. 
15, 1822, the latter dying July 23, 1824, the 
former Oct. 12, 1847, in the city of IMexico, 
while serving in the United States army; 
James, born Oct. 2, 1825, died Feb. 13, 1830 ; 
Archibald (2), born Feb. 2, 1828, married 
Matilda J. Mitchell. 

George Findley Mathews, son of Archibald, 
was bom Aug. 19, 1815, and obtained his edu- 
cation in the subscription schools, such as 
they were. He worked on the home place and 
made farming his life occupation, operating 
a tract of two hundred acres where he can-ied 
on general agriculture and stock raising, also 
dealing in stock. He was an energetic and 
progressive man, succeeded in his various un- 
dertakings, and was a substantial and re- 
spected citizen of the township. His mother 
was devotedly cared for at his home during 
her declining years. He died on the farm 
Aug. 10, 1893, when a few days less than 
seventy-eight years old, and is buried in the 
family lot near the home. He was a member 
and trustee of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. 
Mathews was married in Philadelphia to Re- 
becca Jane Mathews, daughter of William 
Mathews, and she also died on the farm and is 
buried in the cemetery there. ^Irs. ilathews, 
too, was a member of the Presbyterian Church. 
She was the mother of seven children : Eliza- 
beth, who married R. B. Hamilton ; John Find- 
ley, who is on the homestead ; Jennie R., who 
died young: AVilliam, who died when two 
years old; Robert I., who died in 1900 at 
Altoona ; George Herbert ; and Annie, who 
died young. 

George Herbert Mathews, youngest son of 
George F. Mathews, was bom June 24, 1863, 
on the farm and grew to manhood there, at- 
tending the local public schools and later a 
commercial college at Altoona. In his early 
manhood he worked on the home place and 
also did considerable teaming, hauling bark, 
ties and other timber products. For some time 
he was engaged in the mercantile business at 
Buffington, this county, where he wa.s post- 
master for eight years, and for ten years he 
was established on the Clark homestead in 



BufSngton township, a tract of 186 acres which 
he eventually sold to the Lackawanna Coal 
Company, in 1894 returning to the old Find- 
ley farm where three generations of his fam- 
ily had lived before him. Here he has since 
devoted his time to general farming and stock 
raising, also dealing in stock and making a 
specialty of dairying, keeping twenty cows. 
He owns and operates two hundred acres, and 
by hard work has kept his property in first- 
class condition, being noted for his weU- 
directed industry and thrifty management. 
Many up-to-date ideas have been put into 
practice on his place, which bears eveiy mark 
of intelligent care. Mr. Mathews has inter- 
ested himself in local affaii's, serving two 
terms as school director and three terms as 
clerk of the township election board. Politi- 
cally he is a Republican, though he votes in- 
dependently. His religious connection is with 
the Presbyterian Church, which he has served 
as trustee and member of the building com- 
mittee. 

On March 15, 1888, Mr. Mathews married 
in Buffington township Louisa Y. Clark, a 
native of that township, daughter of Thomp- 
.son Clark, who was justice of the peace in 
Buffington township for many years. Six 
children have been born to this union : Jennie 
Rebecca, who married Frederic Knoepfle and 
now resides at Johnstown. Pa. (she graduated 
from the State normal school at Indiana and 
taught for four years prior to her marriage") ; 
Annie Laura, who was educated in the local 
public schools and at summer normal under 
Professors Campbell and Weaver, and has 
taught school for two years ; Lester Clark, now 
living at home, who was educated in the local 
public schools and at summer normal under 
Professors Campbell and Weaver; and Edith 
Adele, George Herbert, Jr., and Mabel, all 
at home. 

ELMER W. ALLISON, druggist, of the 
borough of Indiana, Indiana county, was born 
there July 9, 1866, son of Robert W. and 
Nancy (Lewis) Allison. After taking a pub- 
lic school course in his native place he entered 
the State normal school at Indiana, and taught 
school some years in the count.v. He then 
entered the employ of Dauglierty Brothers, 
an old established drug firm of tliat place, 
with whom he remained for a period of eight 
years, when, ha'^nng become thoroughly 
familiar with the business, he commenced on 
liis own account. He has been successful from 
the start, and has been conducting his own 
place for sixteen years at the present writing 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



819 



(1912). Mr. Allison's standing as a business 
man and record as a good citizen of the com- 
munity show him to be a worthy member of a 
family which has always been known for high 
character and usefulness. He has been par- 
ticularly prominent as a member and worker 
of the Presbyterian Church, in which he is an 
elder and Sunday school teacher, and for 
nearly thirty years has been a member of the 
choir. He has considerable musical talent and 
is endowed with a good voice, and his devo- 
tion to the church has been highly appre- 
ciated. In June, 1907, he was elected a mem- 
ber of th€ school board of Indiana, and is still 
serving. Mr. Allison's maternal great-grand- 
father, John Wilson, was one of the organizers 
and an elder of the first Presbyterian Church 
founded in Indiana, in 1807, and from that 
time continuously down to the present both 
the Wilsons and Allisons have been active 
factore in the welfare of the Presbyterian de- 
nomination in this vicinity. 

On Oct. 26, 1892, Mr. Allison was united in 
marriage to Mary L. Tiffany. 

The following account of the Allison fam- 
ily, "A Sketch of the Allison Family, Espe- 
cially the Line of the Compilers, Mary C. and 
James L. Allison, Aug. 21, 1906," shows the' 
line of Elmer W. Allison, brother of Mary C. 
and James L. Allison. 

The line of descent of this family, of which 
the compilers are members, from Robert Alli- 
son is through John Allison, Robert W. Alli- 
son and Robert Wilson Allison, father of 
James L. and Elmer W. Allison. 

Robert Allison, the great-gi-eat-grandfather, 
was a member of a family that fled from Scot- 
land during the time of the persecution of the 
Protestants. They settled in the North of Ire- 
land, and leaving there in 1750, came to 
America and settled in Cumberland county. 
Pa. In 1752 he married a lady by the name 
of Beckie Baird, a granddaughter of Charles 
Stuart, a descendant of the house of Stuart. 
Robert and Beckie had been passengers on 
the same vessel and formed an acquaintance 
at that time which resulted in their marriage 
two years later. The result of this union was 
six sons and one daughter. The names of the 
sons were Tate, John, Andrew, Robert, James 
and Thomas, and the daughter was Jane, who 
married William Hamilton. 

John Allison, one of the above named sis 
sons, and our great-grandfather, married Han- 
nah Graham. They had five sons and two 
daughters. Robert W., John, James, Andrew 
and a son that was kiUed when a boy were the 



sons, and Jane and Elizabeth were the 
daughters. 

The first wife, Hannah Graham, died, and 
John Allison married Martha Taylor. They 
had three children : Samuel, who died in boy- 
hood; Martha, and Hannah. John Allison 
was married a third time, to Polly Ohara. 

Before the family had been raised the 
father, with part of them, made a settlement 
on Plum creek, Armstrong county, at a place 
where the Altimus mill is now located. This 
place was not long in their possession, as the 
Indians drove them away. They took all their 
lielongings that could be carried on the backs 
of their horses and fled to a fort built on the 
land now within the limits of Homer City. 
After the Indian troubles had quieted Allison 
bought twenty acres of land at the junction 
of Twolick and Yellow creeks, within the pres- 
ent boundary of Homer City. On this tract, 
and on the bank of Yellow creek, he and his 
boys built a "grist" mill, the first one con- 
structed in that locality, if not the first one 
within the bounds of Indiana county. All of 
the machinery and iron used in the building 
of the mill were carried on the backs of horses, 
on "pack saddles." from Franklin county, 
Pa. When this mill was worn out a new one 
was constructed on the bank of Twolick creek. 
The water to turn the mill was taken from 
Yellow creek and the "tail race" emptied the 
used water into Twolick creek. This latter 
mill stood just above where the present mill 
building now stands and near the place where 
the old "water power" mill stood. 

Robert W. Allison was born in Franklin 
county. Pa., Jan. 11, 1780, and he was twelve 
years old when his father built the first mill 
referred to above. The members of the family 
must then have been cjuite young when they 
moved from Franklin county. The sons of 
John Allison all learned the trade of their 
father, that of miller. There was not sufS- 
cient grain to be ground to keep them busy aU 
the year, so they farmed and " 'tended the 
mill" as occasion required. 

It was while " 'tending the mill" that Rob- 
ert W. Allison became acquainted with a 
young girl, Mary Wilson, who "packed 
grists" to the mill and waited until the 
"grist" was ground and took the flour or meal 
honjie with her. This Mary Wilson was the 
daughter of John Wilson, a pioneer settler of 
Indiana county. He had moved to a tract 
of land two miles south of Indiana, on a small 
farm that had been cleared, a few acres only, 
by some one a few years before. This location 
was desirable on account of the natural 



820 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



meadow land that was found along the run 
south of Indiana, and which furnished hay 
and pasture for the horses and cattle. This 
Mary Wilson told us often that she and her 
sister hauled the hay from this meadow land 
to their home b.y means of hand sleds, during 
the winter, and hauled sufficient to feed the 
stock, and that they did this until they had 
sufficient land cleared so that they could raise 
their own hay. 

John Wilson, with his family, moved to this 
farm at the close of the Revolutionary war, in 
which he had served for five years as a member 
of the "Washington Life Guards." He put 
in two winters at Valley Forge at the darkest 
periods of the war, and many times has his 
daughter, our grandmother, told us of their 
anxiety concerning his welfare and his suffer- 
ings and privations, accounts of which he had 
related to them. 

John Wilson was one of the men who laid 
out the town of Indiana. The streets were 
plotted and marked among the trees and un- 
derbi'ush and for many years after the loca- 
tion was fixed there were few buildings. 
(Thomas McLain was another pioneer who 
helped lay out the town of Indiana.) 

John Wilson was a ruling elder and promi- 
nent in organizing the Presbyterian Church 
in Indiana. He was buried in the old 
Lutheran graveyard, but the grave is un- 
marked and its location is unknown. 

The friendship that the young miller, Rob- 
ert W. Allison, had formed for the farmer's 
young lass, Marj^ Wilson, ripened into love, 

and on Nov. 18, , they were united in 

marriage. This young couple took up their 
abode in a cabin on the old Loughry farm, 
joining the Wilson farm, more recently known 
as the Allison farm, or the "Ortondale Stock 
Farm." They moved from that fanu to one 
adjoining it on the south, known as the Banks 
farm, where they lived many years, and where 
our father, Robert W. Allison, was born and 
lived until he was eight yeai-s old. They then 
moved to the Wilson farm, where Robert W. 
died, on Nov. 2, 1857, aged seventy-seven 
years. Grandmother, wife of Robert W., died 
at the same place, in March, 1863, aged eighty- 
five years. 

Robert W. and Mary Wilson Allison raised 
a large family of children, viz. : Robert Wil- 
son, John W.. James, Martha, Hannah, Anne, 
Jane, Sarah. Elizabeth and Mary S.. all of 
whom are now dead. 

Robert Wilson Allison, father of the writers, 
married Nancy Lewis, daughter of James and 
Catherine Loughry Lewis, pioneer residents 



of Washington township, Indiana countv, on 
Oct. 10, 1849. She was born Dec. 2.3, 1828, 
and died Nov. 2, 1892. Her husband, Robert 
Wilson Allison, was born Aug. 17, 1822, and 
died June 25, 1899. This union resulted in 
the birth of five sons and three daughters. 

Blar.y Catherine was born Aug. 5, 1850. She 
lives at the old home, formerly known as the 
"Repine Farm," adjoining Indiana on the 
west. This farm was purchased by father in 
1879. 

James Lewis was born July 9, 1853, and is 
now superintendent of the public schools of 
Wilkinsburg, Pa. He married Anna Eliza- 
beth, daughter of James Harvey and Mar- 
garetta Rankin Bruce, of White township, 
near Indiana, Pa., on Sept. 19, 1883. She 
died on Aug. 29, 1910. They located in 
Puuxsutawney, Pa., soon after their marriage, 
where Mr. Allison had charge of the public 
schools for nineteen years, or until he took 
charge of the schools of Wilkinsburg, in Sep- 
tember, 1902. Their children are: Mary 
Edith, born Aug. 28, 1884 ; Margaretta Bruce, 
born June 9, 1886; James Lewis, born Feb. 
11, 1892, and Robert Wilson, born May 10, 
1895. 

Da-idd Milton, who died on the old home- 
stead, adjoining Indiana, on Dec. 20, 1906, 
was born Sept. 16, 1856. On Nov. 18, 1886, 
he married Elizabeth Hamilton, daughter of 

William and Hamilton, of White 

township, north of Indiana. They had one 
son, Edwin Hamilton, born Aug. 19, 1891. 

Robert Wilson was born Dec. 30, 1858. He 
is a practicing physician of Wilkinsburg, Pa., 
having located there immediately after his 
graduation from Jefferson Medical College, 
Philadelphia. He married Martha, daughter 
of Samuel and Martha Kerr McElroy, of Wil- 
kinsburg, Pa., on Sept. 24, 1891. They have 
one daughter, Anna Lewis, born Nov. 5, 1894. 
Nancy Anna was born May 8, 1862. On 
June 20, 1888, she was married to Henry Turk, 
of Parkers Landing, where they reside. Their 
children are Mary Allison, born June 16, 1892 ; 
John Howard, born Feb. 13, 1894; Elizabeth 
Gertrude, born Feb. 16, 1900; and Charlotte 
Lewis, born March 31. 1901. 

John Scott, who is unmarried, and lives in 
Indiana, was born May 8, 1862. 

Elmer Watt, who is a druggist at Indiana, 
was born July 9, 1866. On Oct. 26, 1892, he 
married Mary Louise, daughter of B. B. and 
Josie Tiffanv, of Indiana, Pa. Their children 
are Marion* Estell. born Sept. 25, 1896, and 
Elinor Louise, born Feb. 23, 1904. 
Elizabeth Gertrude was born July 6, 1870. 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



821 



She is married to Edward C. Green, of East 
Brady, Pennsylvania. 

John W. ■ Allison, son of Robert W. and 
Mary Wilson, married Margaret Hutchison. 
After their children were all bom, the family 
moved to Clinton county, Iowa, where the par- 
ents both died. John died on April 8, 1867, 
ten years after locating in his new home. 
Their children, of whom Hutchison and Mary 
Jane died some time after they located in Iowa, 
are : Newton, Thomas, Clark, and others who 
are living some place in the West. 

James S., youngest son of Robert W. and 
Mary Wilson Allison, married Lucinda Rice, 
of Indiana, Pa. Their children are: Robert 
Wilson, Elizabeth and Martha, who went with 
their parents to Clinton county, Iowa, in 1866. 
The children are all married and live in that 
section of the country, but the father was 
drowned in the Mississippi river June 19, 
1895, and the mother died at Lyons, Iowa, 
since that time. 

Martha, eldest daughter of Robert W. and 
Mary Wilson Allison, was married to James 
Johnston on April 20, 1836, and she died 
March 12, 1880, her husband having died many 
years previous. Her children were: James, 
deceased, who married a Miss Hill, and they 
have a family of children living in Center 
township; John W., who married a Miss Mc- 
Feeters, living, with a family of children, in 
Center township ; and Mary Jane, who is mar- 
ried and living in the southern part of In- 
diana county. 

Hannah, a daughter of Robert W. and Maiy 
Wilson Allison, was married to Joseph White, 
of Center township, on Oct. 6, 1842. She died 
on July 4, 1881, long after her husband, leav- 
ing one son, William W., who married Jane 
Campbell, of Center township. They raised 
a family of children and William is living in 
Homer City. 

Anne, a daughter of Robert W. and Mary 
Wilson Allison, was married to James W. Alli- 
son Oct. 4, 1848, and she died July 18, 1850, 
leaving a daughter, Anna Mary, who died in 
1860. 

Jane, a daughter of Robert W. and Mary 
Wilson Allison, was married to George W. 
Johnston, of Center township, on June 3, 1844. 
She died Aug. 17, 1847, leaving one daughter, 
Mary Jane, who married John Feit. She died, 
leaving one son, George J. Feit, of Indiana, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sarah, Elizabeth and Mary S., daughters 
of Robert W. and Mary Wilson Allison, never 



inarried. They died, respectively, Sept. 17, 
1843, Oct. 26, 1854, and Nov. 25, 1892. 

James,, son of John and Hannah Graham 
Allison, married a Miss McCracken. They 
spent their lives on a farm in Center town- 
ship, where they reared their family, of whom 
Nancy married Joshua Reed and is living in 
Homer City; Joshua married Elizabeth Fair 
and they with their four children are living in 
Kansas; Robert married a Miss Alexander, 
and they with their one child are living in 
Homer City. 

John, son of John and Hannah Graham Al- 
lison, married Jane Henry. They spent their 
entire lives on the farm in Center township, 
where some of their children reside. Their 
son, John H., married Sarah i'air, and they 
spent their lives on a farm adjoining that 
of the father until the death of the husband, 
but the wife is still living there with two un- 
married daughters. Flora and Hattie. Walter, 
their eldest son, is married and living in Kan- 
sas; Robert Orr, their second son, married 
Catherine Wilson, and they live on a farm 
in Center township, they having raised a 
family of thirteen; the youngest son, James 
H., married Elizabeth Johnston, and, with 
one daughter. Belle, they are living in Indi- 
ana. 

Isabelle, daughter of John and Jane Henry 
Allison, was married to Jackson Miller, of 
Center township. They had one daughter and 
two sons. 

Mary Jane, daughter of John and Jane 

Henry Allison, was married to 

France, of Bolivar, Peimsylvania. 

Andrew, son of John and Hannah Graham 
Allison, went ' ' West, " as it was then known, 
and his history is not known. 

Jane Delia, daughter of John and Hannah 
Graham Allison, was married to William 
Dickie. They lived on a farm in White town- 
ship, where their children, George, Lavinia, 
Elizabeth, Hannah, Mary, James and Ursula, 
were reared. 

George, son of William and Jane Allison 
Dickie, married Jane Dixon. They had five 
children: William, married to a Miss Fair, 
and living in Blacklick township (have two 
daughters and one son) ; Nancy, man-ied to 
J. H. Ogden, of Homer City (two sons) ; Jo- 
seph D., Avho first married a Miss Harrold, 
who died leaving two daughters, Mrs. Elmer 
Campbell, of Indiana, Pa., and Jennie (de- 
ceased), and (second) Jennie Campbell, they 
having three daughters, Pearle (married to 
J. T. Henry, Blairsville, Pa., and has chil- 



822 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



dren), Mabel (married to Clarence Smith, In- 
diana, Pa.) and Esther (at home with her 
parents in Indiana). 

Elizabeth Dickie married Frank Brosky, 
and died leaving no children. 

George C. Dickie married Margaret Ann 
Johnston, and lives in Indiana, Pa. Their 
children are: Clai-k, a dentist, of Vander- 
grift. Pa. ; Laura, married to Dr. Nix, living 
at Wehrum, Pa.; the mother of one child ; and 
Belle, Mrs. Glen, of Vandergrift, Pa., who 
has one child. 

Lavinia, daughter of William and Jane Al- 
lison Dickie, was married to Jacob Kaufman, 
of Center township. Of their children, James 
married Miss Mikesell; Banks married Miss 
Boyer; Nannie died, and Jane married John 
Baker. Those married have children. 

Hannah, daughter of William and Jane Al- 
lison Dickie, was married to T. B. Allison, of 
Marchand, Pa. Of their children, Jane mar- 
ried Samuel Brown, their children living about 
Marchand; Nancy married T. B. McComb, 
Marchand, and their one daughter is married 
to Dr. Miles Gnibe, Liudsey, Pa. ; Nancy was 
married a second time to Robert St. Clair, late 
of Denver, Colo., she having died before her 
husband, and they left some children: David 
B. married first Jemima Coulter, and second 
Mrs. Laura Hamilton. 

Elizabeth, daughter of William and Jane 
Allison Dickie, married John ilcMulliu, who 
moved to Illinois. They had two sons. 

Mary, daughter of William and Jane Al- 
lison Dickie, was married to Samuel Ray, of 
Armstrong township. Of their children, Rich- 
ard man-ied Miss Anderson, and had three 
sons and one daughter ; George married Miss 
Young ; and Jane married Robert Johnston. 

James, son of William and Jane Allison 
Dickie, went to California in the excitement of 
'49, and died there. 

Ursula, daughter of William and Jane Alli- 
son Dickie, married a minister by the name of 
Jordon, and they moved South before the 
war. 

Elizabeth, daughter of John and Hannah 
Graham Allison, was married to Michael 
Trainer, of Clarion county. Pa. They had 
five children, of whom the compilers knew 
nothing except of John, who married Caro- 
line Burnham and raised their family on a 
farm near Strattanville, Pa. The wife is liv- 
ing. Of their children, James married a lady 
in Chicago, but be lived only a few years 
after his marriage; John Core raan-ied 
Blanche Smith, of Strattanville, but she lived 
only a short time after their marriage, and 



he married again and is living in Iowa ; Mor- 
ris M., who married Irene Stear, of Smicks- 
burg, now deceased, has two sons and is liv- 
ing in Sibley, Iowa (he married a second 
time) ; Emma is married to Dr. 0. K. Moore, 
of Knox, Pa., and they have the following 
children, Allie (married, has two children), 
Freda, Mamie, Charlie and Otis, at home; 
Anne, married to Joseph Strattan, of Strat- 
tanville, is living with their family at that 
place; Winfield Scott married Carrie Strat- 
tan, of Strattanville, and was killed a few 
years ago, leaving Otis, Howard, Guemey, 
Morris, John and Rose, all at home with their 
mother in Indiana, Pennsj'lvania. 

Jane is a teacher of music at Indiana, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Martha, daughter of John and Martha Tay- 
lor Allison, was married to a Mr. Hendrick- 
.son, of Homer City. Of their children, Will- 
mina married Rev. John Flickinger; Pemelia 
married William McKissen, of Homer City, 
and died leaving one daughter ; Elizabeth, de- 
ceased, was not married; Samuel married a 
Miss Boyd, and they live along the W. P. 
railroad. 

Hannah, daughter of John and Martha Tay- 
lor Allison, was married to Richard Peddi- 
cord, of Center township. She lived to a ripe 
old age, and of her children Mary Ann mar- 
ried William Hill, of Homer City, and thej' 
have a family ; Amanda married James Flick- 
inger, of Homer City, and tkey have a family ; 
Sarah married a Mr. ]\IcMastei-s, and they 
have a family ; Hannah mari'ied Albert Jami- 
son and has a family; Clara and T. Benton, 
unmarried, are living in Virginia; and 
Jefferson. 

LEARD. The Leards of Blackliek town- 
ship, Indiana county, are one of the best 
known among the pioneer families of their 
part of Pennsylvania. The family is of Scotch 
origin, but for generations the home of this 
branch has been in the North of Ireland, 
where Zachariah Leard, the founder of the 
line in Indiana county, was born and grew to 
manhood. There he married Judith Elliott, 
and with their family they left their native 
land in February. 1796, coming to America. 
Proceeding across Pennsylvania to the west of 
the Allegheny mountains, they settled in what 
is now Young township, Indiana county, on 
a farm near Ebenezer Church, establishing a 
permanent home there, where the parents 
passed the remainder of their lives. IMr. 
Leard followed farming. He died on his farm 
about 1820, and was buried in the cemetery of 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



823 



the Ebenezer Presbyterian Church, of which 
he was a faithful member. His wife sur- 
vived him several years, dying about 1826, 
and is buried beside him. She, too, was a 
member of the Ebenezer Church. They were 
the parents of eight children, viz. : Mary, 
born April 1, 1785, who married James Hart, 
of Young township, Indiana Co., Pa.; Wil- 
liam, born March 31, 1788 ; James, born Nov. 
2, 1790; Eleanor, born in Ireland March 20, 
1793, Mrs. McCoomb ; John, born in America 
May 16, 1796; Judith, born May 26, 1799, 
who married William Stewart, of Saltsburg, 
Pa.; Samuel, born Dec. 2, 1801, who died 
young; and Zachariah, born Oct. 12, 1807. 

John Leard, third son of Zachariah and Ju- 
dith (Elliott) Leard, was born May 16, 1796, 
in Young township, and there grew to man- 
hood. Continuing to reside on the homestead 
until three years after his father's death, he 
then moved to Eldersridge, in the same town- 
ship, to farm the Robert Elder place for his 
wife's mother, Mrs. Robert Elder. He was 
on that farm until 1828, when he moved to 
Blacklick township and bought a tract of 226 
acres opposite the village of Livermore. There 
was a log house on the property, and he and 
his family occupied it until 1836, when he 
built the substantial brick dwelling which stiU 
stands on the place. The bricks used in its 
construction were made on the farm. Other 
improvements were made on the tract from 
time to time, and as the land became cleared 
and available for cultivation Mr. Leard en- 
gaged extensively in farming and stock rais- 
ing, prospering throughout life. He died 
there in March, 1858, aged almost sixty-two 
years, and was buried in the Ebenezer Church 
cemetery. He was a faithful member of that 
church, and served as one of the trustees. In 
politics he was a Whig. He took a great in- 
terest in the local militia, in which he held the 
rank of major. At Eldersridge Mr. Leard. 
was married to Mary Ann Elder, daughter of 
Robert and Mary (Smith) Elder, and a de- 
scendant of one of the oldest families of 
Young township. Mrs. Mary Ann (Elder) 
Leard also died on the homestead, and is bur- 
ied in the family plot in Ebenezer Church 
cemetery. She was the mother of five chil- 
dren: Zachariah, Maria Ann (married Rob- 
ert Elder, of Livermore), Margaret (married 
David Morrow), Robert (married Nancy Jane 
Sterling) and Judith (died in infancy). For 
his second wife Mr. Leard married Jane 
Smith of Eldersridge, sister of John and Rob- 



ert Smith, and by that union there were six 
children : Elenor, who is buried in Ebenezer 
cemetery; William, a machinist, who is now 
living retired in Blacklick township ; Jane, de- 
ceased; John, deceased, who is buried in Mis- 
souri (he was married) ; Sarah, who died at 
the age of eighteen years; and James, who 
died in boyhood. The mother of these chil- 
dren died on the farm, and is buried in Eben- 
ezer cemetery. 

Zachariah Leard, son of John and Mary 
Ann (Elder) Leard, was born Jan. 3, 1823, 
in Young township, and was six years old 
when the family settled in Blacklick township, 
where he grew to manhood and received his 
early education, attending public school at 
Roaring Run. He studied surveying there. 
Settling on the homestead place, he engaged 
in general agricultural pursuits, but he also 
gave much time to surveying in Indiana and 
Westmoreland counties, and he was frequently 
called upon to settle up estates, draw up 
deeds, etc. His proved integrity held the con- 
fidence of all his fellow citizens, and he was 
not only called upon to help them adjust their 
personal affairs, but he was also honored with 
public trusts of various kinds, serving as 
school director, assessor, etc. He was active 
in everything with which he became identified. 
A Republican in politics, he was a valued sup- 
porter of that party in his neighborhood. In 
religious matters he was a Presbyterian, and 
a prominent member of the Ebenezer Church 
of which his family have been leading mem- 
bers for so long; he served as trustee and as 
a member of the building committee which 
had charge of the construction of the new 
church. He died on his farm Jan. 3, 1900, 
on the seventy-seventh anniversary of his 
birth, and was laid to rest in the Ebenezer 
Church cemetery. Few men in the locality 
were better known, and none more respected 
for high moral worth. 

On April 8, 1852, Mr. Leard married Jane 
Kelly, a native of White township, Indiana 
county, daughter of Meek and Jane (^loor- 
head) Kelly, and granddaughter of Fergus 
Moorhead. Mrs. Leard died Feb. 10, 1863, 
while still in the prime of young womanhood, 
leaving three children: Sarah Augusta, who 
resides on the homestead; Meek Kelly, who 
is a member of the lumber manufacturing 
firm known as the C. P. Hough & Leard Com- 
pany, at Tarentum, Pa. (he married Mary 
Elizabeth Pownall) ; and Mary Jane, who 
lives at the old homestead with her sister. 
The Misses Leard are members of the Eben- 
ezer Presbyterian Church, to which their 



1129635 



824 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



mother also belonged. She is buried in the 
cemetery of that church. 

HENRY MARTIN FLECK, deceased, who 
was a man not only well known in Marion 
Center but also throughout Indiana county, 
was born Feb. 22, 1837, in Huntingdon 
county. Pa., son of George and Catherine 
(Noble) Fleck. 

Conrad Fleck, grandfather of Henry Mar- 
tin Fleck, is the first of the family of whom 
there is definite knowledge. 

George Fleck, son of Conrad Fleck, was 
married in Sinking Valley, Huntingdon Co., 
Pa., and in 1S40 came to Indiana county, set- 
tling in North Mahoning township, where he 
and his wife died. He was a shoemaker by 
trade, and worked as such all his life. The 
children born to George Fleck and wife were : 
Samuel, who was a soldier in the Civil war, 
married, and died in the Soldiers' Home at 
Dayton, Ohio ; Sarah Ann became Mrs. Frank 
Ramey, and died in Ti-ade City, Indiana 
county; Mary Jane, who married Joseph 
Gates, is living at Johnstown, Pa., being now 
eight}'- two years old (she has had sixteen 
children) ; Henry Martin is mentioned be- 
low ; Martha Ellen married Taylor Ritcliie, 
of West Mahoning township; Frank died in 
Johnstown, Pa. ; Gabriel lives at Johnstown. 

Heniy Martin Fleck grew to manhood's 
estate in West Mahoning township, and there 
learned the carpenter's trade, following it 
during the summer and working in the lum- 
ber woods in the winter. He was crushed 
between two logs and so had to abandon hard 
manual labor, and hence embarked in the ho- 
tel business at Marion Center, in March, 1884, 
so continuing until his death, which occuri-ed 
July 15, 1912. He was a Presbyterian in re- 
ligious faith, and a Republican politically. 

On Jan. 29, 1863, Mr. Fleck was married to 
Elizabeth McClusky, of West Mahoning town- 
ship, a daughter of Andrew and Eve (Ga- 
hagan) McClusky. The fonuer was county 
commissioner and county treasurer of In- 
diana county and a man of importance. A 
brother of Mrs. Fleck, Benjamin Franklin Mc- 
Clusky, was county treasurer, and died while 
in ofSce Aug. 15, 1882. j\Ir. and Mrs. Fleck 
became the parents of the following children : 
Frank Earl, who is deceased ; William, who is 
deceased; and il. Edith, who married John 
Adamson, and is living at home. 

Mr. Fleck was a man of fine traits of char- 
acter, and developed into a citizen of sub- 
stance. His hotel was popular and he is still 
remembered by those who were his guests. 



In his death Marion Center was deprived of 
a reliable and honorable citizen, and his fam- 
ily of a valued member. It is such men as 
he who demonstrate that faithfulness and de- 
votion to duty pay in the long run. 

WILLIAM H. STITT, a real estate dealer 
and insurance agent of Blairsville, Indiana 
county, was born in Pittsburg, Pa., Oct. 8, 
1846, son of Alexander and Anna B. (Lippy) 
Stitt. 

John Stitt came from Huntingdon county. 
Pa., to Pittsburg at an early day, and there 
died aged fifty-seven years. 

Alexander Stitt, son of John Stitt, and 
father of William H. Stitt, was born in 1820 in 
Huntingdon county, and moved with his 
father to Pittsburg, where he became a pros- 
perous plastering contractor. His death oc- 
cuiTed in 1883 in Blairsville, Pa. His wife, 
who was a native of Maryland, was also born 
in 1820, and lived until 1904. Alexander 
Stitt joined the Republican party on its or- 
ganization and gave it his undivided support 
the remainder of his life. He was a man of 
energy, and not only gave valuable support 
to local affairs, but could be counted upon in 
matters relating to larger things., for there 
was never a big or wholesome movement on 
foot iu the State that he was not interested in. 
A thoroughly competent man in his special 
line, he developed a prosperous business and 
died a man of considerable means. 

William H. Stitt attended the public 
schools of the Fourth ward in Pittsburg, 
Shafer's commercial college, and art school, 
being taught mechanical drawing in the latter 
institution. Following this he learned the 
cai'penter trade with Slack & Sholes, remain- 
ing with this firm for six years. His business 
career was broken into by his service to his 
country during the Civil war, liut in 1869 he 
began conducting a planing mill at the Fifth 
avenue extension to Pittsburg, thus continu- 
ing for two years. In the fall of 1871 he 
located at Blairsville, where he has since re- 
mained, at that time becoming a member of 
the planing mill firm of Walker, Stitt & Co., 
and so operating until 1874. In that year 
he sold his interest to his partners, and con- 
tinued to work at his trade until 1882, when 
he bought the ' ' Silver Maple Hotel ' ' in Blaii-s- 
ville, now the "Mei-ehants' Hotel." and put it 
into first-class order, conducting it for six and 
a half years. In 1890 he leased this property, 
although he retained the ownership, and in 
1898 he embarked in an extensive realty busi- 
ness, later adding the writing of insurance. 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



825 



His success along these kindred lines has been 
very gratifying, and his holdings are given 
consideration by prospective buyers. 

On Aug. 23, 1864, Mr. Stitt was mustered 
into the Union service under Capt. George 
jMorgau at Pittsburg, where he had enlisted, 
and among many engagements participated in 
the following: Weldon Railroad, Peebles 
Farm, Thatcher's Run, Dabney Mills, Quak- 
er's Road, Boydton Plank Road, "White Oak 
Grove and Five Forks. He was honorably 
discharged at Columbia College hospital, 
Washington, D. C, on account of a wound in 
the abdomen received at Quaker's Road, Va., 
March 29, 1865. 

In 1868 Mr. Stitt was united in marriage 
with Anna E. McKinlej% of Allegheny, daugh- 
ter of Samuel McKinley. She died in 1869. 
In 1872, Mr. Stitt was married to Jennie M. 
Hoffman, of Parnassus, Pa. The following 
children were born of this marriage : Harry 
E., of Cleveland, Ohio; Millie I., who is the 
wife of William Spear, of Blairsville; Anna 
Blanche, who is deceased; Jean and Eugene, 
twins; and Arthur of Blairsville. 

Mr. Stitt has been a member of the council 
of Blairsville several times, and has proved 
himself a very efficient man in that ofHce. A 
charter mem,ber of Finley Patch Post, No. 
137, G. A. R., he was its tirst quartermaster, 
and has been its commander as well. In 1866 
he joined the Methodist Church and has been 
a generous supporter of same ever since. A 
man of progressive ideas, Mr. Stitt has lived 
in conformity with what he believes to be the 
best interests of his community, and no one 
stands higher in the public estimation than he. 

EDWIN K. WOOD, D. D. S., engaged in 
the practice of dental surgery in Indiana bor- 
ough. Pa., was born in old West Indiana bor- 
ough, Indiana Co., Pa., Nov. 29, 1879, and is 
a son of William Hervey and Mary (Kim- 
mell) Wood. 

Edwin K. Wood received his preliminary 
education in the public schools of Indiana bor- 
ough, following which he became a student in 
the Indiana high school, being graduated 
therefrom with the class of 1896. He sub- 
sequently spent one year in the Indiana State 
normal school, for three years devoted his 
activities to civil engineering, and spent one 
year at State College. He next became a stu- 
dent in the Medico-Chirurgical College of Den- 
tistry, at Philadelphia, from which he received 
his degree and graduated with the class of 
1903. He immediately engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession at Smithton, Westmore- 



land county, and after three years there came 
to Indiana. He is a young man of undoubted 
ability, and has built up a large professional 
patronage. 

Dr. Wood was married May 28, 1907, in In- 
diana, to Mary M. Jones, of Latrobe, West- 
moreland county, daughter of Daniel W. and 
Mary Jones. Dr. and JMrs. Wood are mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian Church. He is a 
member of Indiana Lodge, No. 313, P. & 
A. M., the Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity which 
he joined at State College, the Psi Omega Den- 
tal Fraternity (at the Medico-Chirurgical 
college), and the Society of Stomatology. In 
polities he is associated with the Republican 
party, but he has never sought public pre- 
ferment. 

WALTER BATES GEORGE, who Uvea 
two miles west of Homer City, in Center 
township, Indiana county, is one of the most 
enterprising and successful farmers of that 
section. He was born Oct. 2, 1835, in Arm- 
strong township, Indiana county, son of John 
and Mary (Brown) George. 

James George, grandfather of Walter Bates 
George, was the tirst of this family to come 
to America. He was a native of Ireland, and 
was only a small boy when he worked his way 
over on a sailing vessel, landing in the New 
World with just one shilling in his pocket. 
Being entii-ely without friends, he was soon 
obliged to part with that, spending his last 
penny for a crust of bread and a tin of but- 
termilk, but he soon found work, and before 
long had succeeded in saving enough money 
to bring him over the Allegheny mountains 
into western Pennsylvania. He stopped near 
New Alexandria, on the Loyalhanna creek in 
Westmoreland county, where he obtained em- 
ployment chopping timber and clearing land, 
the region being then a wilderness. After 
working thus for a time he took up 300 acres 
of land for himself near Snodgrass's Mills, 
where he built a stone house, using the small 
stones found on the place. Working early 
and late he managed to clear a farm and make 
a home for his family, and he lived to enjoy 
the fruits of his labor, reaching a ripe old 
age. In religion he was a Presbyterian, in 
politics a Democrat. He married Mary Mc- 
Clure, of Westmoreland county, and they had 
eight children: Polly, who married Robert 
Woodward; Sally, who married William 
Trimble ; Jlartha, who married William Cald- 
well, of Indiana, proprietor of the old "Gom- 
pers Hotel"; Eliza, who married James Fos- 
ter, of Westmoreland county; John, of Arm- 



826 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



strong township, Indiana county; Thomas, of 
Clarion, Pa. ; James, of BrookviUe, Pa. ; and 
William, who remained on the homestead, 
earing for his parents. 

John George, son of James and Mary (Me- 
Clure) George, was a young man when he lo- 
cated in Armstrong township, Indiana county, 
on a tract of 250 acres where he first erected 
a hewed log house. He cleared the land and 
continued to make improvements until by his 
industry and thrift he had established a good 
home, and there he spent the rest of his life 
as a farmer, dying at the age of eighty years. 
His wife Mary (Brown), daughter of Walter 
Brown, was born in England, and came to 
America with her parents when twelve years 
old. She was noted for her intelligence and 
many sterling qualities, and her tine penman- 
ship won much admiration. Mrs. George died 
on the homestead at the age of sixty-one years, 
and she and her husband are buried side by 
side in the Jacksonville cemeterJ^ They were 
members of the Presbyterian Church. In 
politics ;\Ir. George was a Democrat. Nine 
children were born to this couple: Selina 
married Leasure McKean, of Janette, Pa. ; 
James Walter, twin of Selina, is deceased, and 
is buried in Oakland cemeterv, at Indiana; 
Evaline Emma, now the widow of Elliott 
Thompson, resides in Pocahontas, Iowa ; Wal- 
ter Bates is mentioned below; Hannah Mary 
married Ephraim Davis and (second) a ]\Ir. 
Cunningham, and resides in Janette, Pa. ; 
Phoebe died when six years old ; Wm. Hai-vey 
died at the age of nineteen years; ^Martha 
Ann died at the age of sixteen; John A., a 
retired railroad man, resides in Allegheny, 
Pennsylvania. 

Walter Bates George attended school in 
Armstrong townaship and worked on his 
father's farm until he reached the age of eigh- 
teen years. Then he left home to learn the 
trade of carpenter with Charles McCrackeu, 
with whom he worked two years. While an 
apprentice he received a dollar a week, and 
for the six years following, when he was work- 
ing for himself, he earned from sixteen to 
eighteen dollars a month and his board. Dur- 
ing this time he was employed at Shelocta. 
and Marion Center, Indiana county. In 1850 
he came to Center township and purchased the 
Thomas Hamilton farm of 130 acres, upon 
which he erected a large frame barn, modern 
dwelling and other. buildings. The barn was 
destroyed by fire July 31, 1909. As a busi- 
ness farmer Mr. George has few equals in his 
section. His skill as a carpenter has naturally 
aided hhn in keeping his buildings in first- 



class repair, but he is a thorough manager in 
every respect, neglecting nothing that would 
add to the value or appearance of any of his 
holdings. He has been able to add to his 
landed possessions, having bought three farms, 
of 168 acres, sixty acres and sixty-nine acres, 
respectively, adjoining his original purchase, 
and he has also bought and sold three hun- 
dred acres near Josephine and sixty-eight 
acres east of Homer City. His practical 
methods and systematic work have made him 
verj' successful as a farmer and stock raiser, 
and though now in his seventy-eighth year 
he continues to direct the farm work, his 
property bearing evidence of his master hand 
in its well-kept buildings and altogether at- 
tractive surroundings no less than in its fer- 
tility. Though he has alwaj^s worked steadily 
he is vigorous in mind and body, and as in- 
terested in the affairs of his familj' and com- 
munity as ever. He has been a man of strictly 
temperate habits, never using tobacco or 
spirits. 

On March 3, 1859, Mr. George married 
Nancy Jane Hamilton, who was born ]\Iareh 
1, 1835, daughter of Thomas and Anna 
(Johnson) Hamilton, of Center township, 
and died June 16, 1909. They celebrated the 
golden anniversary of their wedding appropri- 
atel.v in ]\Iarch, 1909. Mrs. George was a 
woman of high Christian character, a lifelong 
member of the Bethel Presbyterian Church, 
and is buried in Greenwood cemetery', at In- 
diana. Mr. George became associated with 
the Presbyterian Church at Homer City in 
early manhood, helped to build a church there, 
and was elder for many years. He now at- 
tends the Bethel Church, of which he is an 
active member. In his political views he has 
always been a Republican. 

Pour children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
George : ( 1 ) Anna Marv, born April 14, 
1860, married William B. Crawford, of Eld- 
ersridge. Pa., and has one child, Walter Ham- 
ilton. (2) James Harvey, born Oct. 1, 1861. 
married Elsie Baker, of Center township, and 
has one child, Leah Jane. (3) Thomas Frank- 
lin, born Oct. 3, 1869, who lives on a farm 
near the homestead, married Catherine Rob- 
inson, of Armstrong township, and they have 
five children, Wayne, Nancy Elizabeth. Wil- 
mer, Esther and Carl. (4) William Hamil- 
ton, born July 11. 1877, lives on the home- 
stead. He married Wilda J. Clark, of Center 
township, daughter of John R, Clark, and 
they have three children, Martha Jane, Elsie 
Genevra and Walter Clark. 

Hamilton. The Hamilton family of Cen- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



827 



ter township, of whicli the late Mrs. Walter 
Bates George was a descendant, is of Scotch 
extraction, but this branch has been on this 
side of the Atlantic for over one hundred 
fifty years. The early home of the family 
was at Hawmilltown, Scotland, and the coat 
of arms was a sawmill. 

James Hamilton, the first of this line to 
settle in Pennsylvania, came to America in 
1750 and married a JMiss Laughlin. They had 
three sons, Hugh, James and "William, all of 
whom, according to family tradition, partici- 
pated in the Revolutionary war in defense of 
the Colonial cause. After the close of the war 
the family came to western Pennsylvania, lo- 
cating in that part of Westmoreland county 
which became Indiana county, William Ham- 
ilton (son of James) settling on what is now 
known as the Brookside farm, on Cherry run, 
owned by Walter B. George. He owned a 
tract of 130 acres which he cleared and culti- 
vated, built a house and a barn, and made 
other improvements, though his arm was crip- 
pled as the result of injuries he received while 
serving in the Revolution. He became one of 
the leading men of the township in his day, 
taking a deep interest and active part in pub- 
lic afi'airs of town and county. He was justice 
of the peace or trial justice for many years, 
holding his court on the farm, where he had 
an office constructed of round logs. He had 
charge of all the court work east of the river. 
He spent all his days on the farm, dying 
there July 8, 1839, at the age of eighty-four 
j'ears; he was born in 1755. His remains rest 
in the Bethel Church cemetery in Center 
township, where a fine marble headstone, 
ei-ected by his gi-anddaughter, Mrs. Walter B. 
George, marks his last resting place. In re- 
ligion he was a stanch Presbyterian, and a 
ruling elder of the church in which he held 
membership. Mr. Hamilton married Jane 
Allison, who was born in 1765, daughter of 
Robert and Beekie (Baird) Allison, and died 
Oct. 25, 1842, aged seventy-seven years. They 
had the following children: James, Robert 
and John, all of whom died in White town- 
ship, Indiana county; Thomas; Mary S., who 
died unmarried; I\Iargaret L., who died un- 
married ; and another daughter whose name 
is not given. 

Thomas Hamilton, son of William, was 
born* March 16, 1797. He settled on the 
homestead place, where he followed farming 
and stock raising all his life, and he became a 
well-known and highly respected man in his 
locality. He was a Republican in politics and 
in religious connection a Presbyterian, serv- 



ing as elder of the Bethel Church. He died 
Jan. 8, 1877, and is buried near his parents 
in Bethel Church cemetery. On Dec. 15, 1825, 
J\Ir. Hamilton married Anna Johnson, who 
was born Dec. 12, 1799, daughter of James 
Johnson, and died Oct. 11, 1870; she, too, 
was a member of the Bethel Church and is 
buried in the cemetery there. Nine children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton: Mary 
Ann, born Jan. 31, 1827, died Oct. 11, 1851; 
Jane, bom Feb. 16, 1828, died Feb. 23, 1835 ; 
Sarah Tate, born Oct. 13, 1833, died June 25, 

1875, was the wife of Robert Thompson, of 
Rayne township, Indiana county ; John John- 
son, born Oct. 13, 1833, died Nov. 5, 1834; 
Nancy Jane, born March 1, 1836, married 
Walter Bates George; William Wilson, born 
March 18, 1837, died May 16, 1842; Eliza- 
beth Margaret, born Oct. 29, 1838, married 
James George, of Armstrong township, In- 
diana county ; Euphemia, bom Nov. 13, 1840, 
died July 14, 1842 ; James Johnson, born Sept. 
9, 1842, died May 31, 1850. 

WILLIAM HUDSON McQUILKIN, of 

Glen Campbell, Indiana county, chief clerk 
and paymaster at that point of the Indiana 
Coal Company, and manager of the Mammoth 
Supply Company's general store in the bor- 
ough, has lived in this part of Indiana county 
practically all his life. He was born Oct. 3, 

1876, in Montgomery township, son of John 
Thomas and Anna Elizabeth (Gardner) Mc- 
Quilkin. The father was a carpenter and mill- 
wright, and particularly skillful and well 
known as a barn framer. He died Aug. 27, 
1908 ; Mrs. McQuilkin died in 1888. 

William H. McQuilkin attended public 
school and acquired a good education, in his 
earlier manhood following the teacher's pro- 
fession, at which he was engaged for a few 
terras in Glen Campbell. Then he took a 
business course, attending the Tri-State Nor- 
mal College, at Angola, Ind. In 1903 he en- 
tered the employ of the Indiana Coal Com- 
pany, at Glen Campbell, in the capacity of 
chief clerk and paymaster, and has continued 
to fill that position ever since, in addition act- 
ing as manager of the general store of the 
Mammoth Supply Company at Glen Camp- 
bell. He is also interested in the Giant Elec- 
tric Light, Heat & Power Company and is 
one of the directors. Mr. McQuilkin has done 
his share in promoting good government in 
the borough, having served as member of the 
council. In fraternal connection he is a mem- 
ber of the I. 0. 0. F. 

On June 14, 1904, Mr. McQuilkin married 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Lola Asenatli Holman, of Friendsville, Md., 
daughter of W. F. Holman, a blacksmith and 
wagon manufacturer, and they have had one 
son, John Holman, born Aug. 8, 1906. 

Mr. McQuilkin is one of the most progres- 
sive and enterprising young business men in 
his part of the county, and his intelligence 
and foresight entitle him to rank among its 
most valuable citizens. 

REV. JAMES M. IMBRIE, whose long and 
faithful service has made him one of the best- 
beloved ministers of the United Presbyterian 
ministry in Indiana county, was born Jan. 22, 
1841, in Mahoning county, Ohio, and is a son 
of Robert and Isabella (McConahey) Imbrie. 

James Imbrie, his gi-andfather, was born in 
Glasgow, Scotland, and wa.s married in Phila- 
delphia, Pa., to Euphemia Smart, also a native 
of Glasgow. They left America at the time of 
the outbreak of the Revolutionary war to re- 
turn to their native land and take possession 
of certain property which had been left ^Irs. 
Imbrie by her father. They then again set 
sail for this country, but were caught in a 
shipwreck, and although their lives were 
spared they lost nearly all their earthly pos- 
sessions. Mr. Imbrie was in poor health and 
hired a substitute to serve in his place in the 
Continental army, but had a narrow escape 
from falling into the hands of the British sol- 
diers stationed at Philadelphia, who, hearing 
that he had been keeping powder in his little 
store to supply the Colonial troops, searched 
the place. Jilrs. Imbrie, however, was more 
than a match for the Britishers, for she slipped 
around by a rear entrance, secured the powder 
and hid it in a pile of ashes. In later years 
Mr. and Mrs. Imbrie moved to Washington 
county. Pa., where both died, his wife meet- 
ing her death by being gored by a mad bull 
in the barnyard. They had the following chil- 
dren: David, a United Presbyterian minis- 
ter, at Darlington, Pa., who married a Miss 
Reed; James, who married a Miss Maloney, 
and died near Salem, Ore. ; Robert ; John, who 
died in Beaver county. Pa. ; George, who died 
at Wellesley, Ohio; Euphemia, of Holmes 
county, Ohio, Avho married a Mr. Beaver, and 
(second) a Mr. Guinn; Elizabeth, who mar- 
ried a Mr. Guinn; Jane, who married Henry 
IMaloney ; and Mary, Mrs. Flack. 

Robert Imbrie, son of James Imbrie, and 
father of Rev. James M. Imbrie, was born in 
the city of Philadelphia, Pa., about the year 
1790, and with his parents removed to "Wa.sh- 
ington county. Pa. He received a good edu- 
cation, attending the country schools and a 



seminary, and was reared to the life of an 
agriculturist, a vocation which he followed 
throughout his career. He held a captain's 
commission in the minute-men, and had com- 
mand of a company which participated in the 
activities of the war of 1812. His first wife, 
Mary Stewart, died without issue, and his 
second union was to Isabella McConahey, the 
widoAv of James AlcConahey. They located in 
JIahoning county, Ohio, where Mr. Imbrie 
died at the remarkable age of ninety-five years, 
Jlrs. Imbrie passing away when eighty years 
of age. They had a family of three children, 
as follows : Rev. James M. ; Mary J., who mar- 
ried Isaac M. Justis; and Robert, deceased. 
The last named served for three years during 
the Civil war, first enlisting for nine months 
in the 134th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers, and at Chancellorsville he w-as wounded 
and taken prisoner. He was subsequently ex- 
changed and sent home, and later enlisted in 
the 60th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 

James M. Imbrie grew to manliood in Ma- 
lioning county, Ohio, and as a lad attended 
the country schools in the vicinity of his 
father's farm. He was subsequently sent to 
Westminster College, where he had been a 
.student two years when the Civil war broke 
out, and he became a private in Company E, 
23d Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, the 
same regiment in which the late Presidents 
McKiuley and Hayes served. Mr. Imbrie 's 
service covered a period of three years, 
twenty-three days, his regiment being attached 
to the Army of the Potomac, and he served in 
such hotly-contested engagements as South 
]\Iountain and Antietam. At the conclusion 
of a brave and brilliant service he returned to 
college, but while he was in his junior year his 
brother died and he was obliged to return to 
his home. Subsequently he read law and was 
admitted to the bar, later going to Nebraska, 
where he was engaged in practice in Cass 
<'ounty for some time. While there he became 
interested in the work of the United Presby- 
terian Church, and later returning to Penn- 
sylvania entered Allegheny Theological Semi- 
nary, from which he was graduated diu-ing 
the following spring. While in that institu- 
tion he was a roommate of Rev. Samuel G. 
Fitzgerald, who now has a charge in Phila- 
delphia. Mr. Imbrie was first sent as pastor 
of the churches of Clinton and Shiloli. in But- 
ler county, later had charge of the Mt. Zion 
congregation in Armstrong county, and 
eventually was sent to Murrysville and Beu- 
lali. Finally he came to Indiana, where he 
has since been located. He is a member of 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



829 



G. A. R. Post No. 28, and in his political views 
is a Prohibitionist. 

In 1867 Mr. Imbrie was married to Rachel 
Catherine Rankin, daughter of Thomas Ran- 
kin, a former elder of the Mt. Prospect con- 
gi'egation, and six children have been born to 
this union: Catherine Alberta, who mai'ried 
Jacob C. Starr, of Kittanning; Maud, who 
married John Doyle, deceased; G. IMildred, 
who married R. R. Ryerson, of Nebraska ; and 
Bessie, who is unmarried and resides with her 
parents; two other children, sons, died in 
infancy. ' 

JESSE W. BURKHART has a well-estab- 
lished hardware and general merchandise 
business at Penn Run, where he has been 
settled ever since he began on his own ac- 
count. He was born Aug. 28, 188.5, in Pine 
township, Indiana county, where his grand- 
father, Samuel Burkhart, settled at an early 
day, farming there until his death. 

Henrj^ A. Burkhart, father of Jesse "W. 
Burkhart, was born in Blair county, Pa., and 
came with his father to Pine township, In- 
diana county. He was a farmer in his earlier 
life, and later followed the trade of carpen- 
ter in connection with his agricultural pur- 
suits. During the Civil war he enlisted from 
Indiana county in Company E, 177th Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served till 
tiie close of the war. After the close of the 
war he returned to Pine township, where he 
lived until his removal to Cherryhill township, 
in 1901. He settled at' Penn Run, where he 
made his home until his death, which oc- 
curred March 11, 1907. He married Sarah A. 
Rhodes, who was born in Indiana county, 
whose parents, William and Margaret Rhodes, 
were early residents of Pine township and 
lived and died there. Mrs. Burkhart died 
Sept. 29, 1909. 

Jesse W. Burkhart, only child of Henry A. 
and Sarah A. (Rhodes) Burkhart, spent his 
early life in Pine township and attended school 
there and at Penn Run. His school days over 
he embarked in the mercantile business at 
Penn Run, in Cherryhill township, also selling 
hardware, and he has a very profitable trade, 
which is growing steadily. Though one of the 
youngest business men at that place he has 
been highly successful, and his extensive busi- 
ness has been built up as a result of hard 
work and good management. He has been 
honored with election to the office of school 
director of Cherryhill township, in which posi- 
tion he is now serving. 

On June 12, 1907, Mr. Burkhart married 



Ruth 0. Fyock, who was born Aug. 26, 1891, 
in Penn Run, daughter of James M. and 
Christina (Holsopple) Fyock, natives of In- 
diana county, who live at Penn Run, where 
j\Ir. Fyock has a general merchandise and un- 
dertaking business. Mr. and Mrs. Burkhart 
have had one child, Eva V., born Jan. 3, 1908. 
ilr. Burkhart is a member of the Lutheran 
Church, his wife belonging to the Brethren 
(German Baptist) Church. He is a member 
of Lodge No. 1168, I. 0. 0. F., at Pine Flats. 

WILLIAM S. DAUGHERTY has con- 
ducted a planing mill business at Indiana for 
almost a quarter of a century, succeeding his 
father as proprietor of an establishment with 
which the latter first became connected in 
1866. He has a large patronage in this local- 
itj^ and is recognized as one of its substantial 
business men. In his earlier years he was 
quite prominently identified with public life 
in the county. 

j\lr. Daugherty was born Jan. 22, 1846, at 
Saltsbui-g, Indiana county, son of James R. 
and Mary A. (Hart) Daugherty, and grand- 
soil of IJugh Daugherty. The latter was a 
native of Ireland. He came to western Penn- 
sylvania in 1799, settling at what is now the 
site of Irwin, in Westmoreland county, in what 
is now North Huntingdon township. 

James R. Daugherty, father of William S. 
Daugherty, was born in Westmoreland county 
and there spent his youth until he reached the 
age of fourteen years. He then came to what 
is now Saltsburg to work upon the old Penn- 
sylvania canal. In 1863 he was elected sheriff 
of Indiana county and removed to Indiana, 
where he ever afterward made his home. 
After serving one term in that office, in 1866, 
he became a member of the firm of Coleman, 
Ewing & Co., in the planing mill business, 
withdrawing from that association in 1872, 
when he entered upon his second term of 
service as sheriff. At the end of that term 
(three years) he purchased the planing mill 
of which he had formerly been part owner, 
carrying on the business until he sold it to 
his son William S. Daugherty, in 1889. Mr. 
Daugherty was one of the foremost citizens 
of Indiana county in his day, a member of 
the community in whom all his fellow citizens 
had the highest confidence. He held many im- 
portant borough offices, and was one of the 
original trustees of the Indiana State nonnal 
school, serving for many yeare, until his death. 
In politics he was a Republican, in religion a 
member of the Presbyterian Church. 

In 1839 Mr. Daugherty married Mary A. 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Hart, who was bom in 1820, daughter of Wil- 
liam Hart, who was of Scotch descent; Mr. 
Hart settled in Indiana county, where he re- 
sided until his death. Like her husband Mrs. 
Daugherty was a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. The}' were the parents of eight chil- 
dren: Robert J., who joined the Union se^■^'- 
ice during the Civil war, becoming a member 
of Company C, 9th Regiment, Pennsylvania 
Volunteei-s, and died of exhaustion in the 
Seven Days' fight; William S. ; Martha, wife 
of John P. St. Clair; James; Frank; Annie; 
John, and Silas C. 

WilUam S. Daugherty has passed practically 
all his life in his native county — all but one 
year in Kansas, 1870, and one year in Brook- 
ville, 1872. He received his early education 
in the common schools and later attended 
Saltsburg Academj'. After leaving school he 
learned the carpenter's trade, which he fol- 
lowed for three years, at the end of that time 
becoming interested in the drug business, in 
which he continued to be engaged, off and on, 
until 1872. At that time he became deputy 
sheriff under his father, who was then serving 
as sheriff, and he served three successive terms 
in that office, continuing with Sheriffs Wil- 
liam C. Brown and Daniel Ansley after his 
father's tenn expired. Toward the close of 
his third term, in 1881, he was elected protho- 
notarj' of Indiana county, was reelected in 
1884, and continued to hold that office until 
1888, when he retired. In 1889 he was ap- 
pointed to superintend the erection of the 
West Indiana school building. Late in the 
fall of that year he purchased the planing 
mill from his father, and he has continued to 
carry on the business ever since. This mill, 
erected in 1856, is a large two-story frame 
structure, fitted throughout with all the most 
approved conveniences for carrying on the 
work in hand. The building has been en- 
larged and improved from time to time to 
meet the gi-owing demands of the business and 
to bring it up to date in equipment, and the 
facilities for turning out the work required 
by modern contractors are ample and com- 
plete. Mr. Daugherty manufactures and deals 
in rough and worked hunber of all kinds, 
flooring, weather boarding, ceiling and bill 
lumber, handles doors, sash, moldings and 
brackets, and is able to turn out anything for 
the custom trade. His patronage is not con- 
fined to the immediate locality, but extends 
all over the southern part of the county. 

Since retiring from the office of prothono- 
tary Mr. Daugherty has not been as active in 
public life as formerly, but he has continued 



his interest in the general welfare and has 
been mterested in the good government of his 
home community, which he has served for 
thirty-four years in the capacity of school 
director, still holding that office. He has 
been a trustee of the normal school for seven- 
teen years, having been first appointed to that 
position in 1894, and still continuing to fill it. 
He is an influential member of the Republican 
party, showing his progressive spirit in poli- 
tics as in business and all the other relations 
of life. 

On Sept. 19, 1876. Jlr. Daugherty married 
Martha V. Sansom, daughter of John Sansom, 
and sister of James B. Sansom, at one time 
editor of the Indiana Democrat. Mr. and Mrs. 
Daughertv have two children,' Hart B. and 
Ross S. 

'Sir. Daugherty has been well known in 
local fraternal circles, as a member of Palla- 
dium Lodge, No. 346. I. 0. O. F., Indiana 
Lodge, No. 21, A. 0. U. W., and the Masons, 
in the latter connection belonging to Indiana 
Lodge. No. 313. F. & A. M.. Zerubbabel Chap- 
ter, No. 162. R. A. M., Pittsburg Command- 
ery. No. 1, K. T., and Syria Temple. A. A. O. 
N. M. S., of Pittsburg. In 1898 he was ap- 
pointed district deputy grand master of the 
Thirty-ninth district and is still serving. For 
five years he served as master of the blue 
lodge. In religious connection he is a member 
of the Presbyterian Church. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON C R I B B S, 
farmer of West Wheatfield township. Indiana 
county, and formerly also engaged in black- 
smithing, is an enterprising and respected citi- 
zen of that section and has lived at his present 
home there for over thirtj'-five 3'ears. He was 
bom April 28, 1840, on the present Joseph 
McCraeken farm in the same township, and is 
a son of George Cribbs and grandson of 
Jacob Cribbs. 

Jacob Cribbs settled at an early day in 
Blacklick township, Indiana Co., Pa., where 
he owned a large tract of land. He was a 
wheelwright by trade and became a noted 
wagonmaker in his day, in addition following 
farming and stock raising. He served as a 
soldier in the war of 1812. In religion he 
was a Lutheran, belonging to the Evangelical 
Church, and he was laid to rest in the 
Lutheran cemetery in Blacklick township. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Stofenel, 
was a native of Germany. They had the fol- 
lowing children: Jacob was twice married; 
George is mentioned below; David married 
Catherine Cribbs; Betsey married John 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



831 



Eepine and went West; Maiy married Wil- 
liam Fair and lived for a time in Blacklick 
township, later moving to Altoona, Pa., where 
they died (their children were: Peter, Susan, 
who married Washington Bell; Mary Jane, 
who married Jackson Bell; Elizabeth, who 
married Samuel Doty; Henry, who married 
a Miss Gilger; Sarah, who married Abe 
Mikesell; Julia, who married Christopher 
Mikesell; and William). 

George Cribbs, son of Jacob, was born in 
1798 in Blacklick township, on his father's 
farm (now the George H. Cribbs farm), and 
there received his education in the subscrip- 
tion schools. After learning the trade of 
blacksmith he moved to West Wheatfield 
township, where he bought the Samuel Wad- 
dell farm of ninety acres and settled down to 
farming and stock raising, also following his 
trade. He was a Democrat up to 1852, sub- 
sequently joining the Republican party, and 
took some interest in local affairs, serving as 
school director. Originally a member of the 
Lutheran Church, he later joined the M. E. 
Church, toward which he contributed liber- 
ally. He died in 1866, at the age of sixty- 
eight years. 

Mr. Cribbs was married to Jane Barr, who 
was born in 1800 in Ireland, daughter of Sam- 
uel and Margaret (Patterson) Barr, and died 
in 1884. Six children were born to this union, 
viz.: Jacob married Nancy Bojde and (sec- 
ond) Margaret Repine, and had one child by 
the first wife, George I., and the following by 
the second marriage, Charles, Jesse, Albert 
and Ida ; Andrew J. B. died while serving in 
the Civil war as a member of the 2d Iowa 
Regiment ; Peter I., who also served in the 2d 
Iowa Regiment during the Civil war, mar- 
ried Adaline McBride, and has children, Mar- 
celles Mc, Mary A., Catherine and Joseph; 
George W. is mentioned below; Christopher 
M., who served in the 112th Pennsylvania 
Provisional Regiment, Heavy Artillery, mar- 
ried Margaret Crusan and (second) Cather- 
ine Metz, and resides in Blacklick township 
(his children are Lina, Ralph and Nellie) ; 
Mary J. married Joseph D. McCracken, and 
they had six children, William, J\Iai-ion. Barr, 
Edward, Mary Elizabeth and George I. 

George Washington Cribbs received a com- 
mon school education, and learned the trade 
of blacksmith with his father. Shortly after 
he attained his majority, on Aug. 5, 1861, he 
enlisted in the Union army, becoming a mem- 
ber of Company A, 83d Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers, with which he served over three years. 



being honorably discharged in October, 1864. 
His officers were Capt. Charles Mox-gan and 
Capt. D. P. Jones, and Cols. John M. Mc- 
Clane, Strong Vincent and 0. S. Woodward. 
Besides twenty small battles and skirmishes, 
he saw active service at Yorktown, Meadow 
Bridge, Hanover Court House, second Bull 
Run, Brandy Station, Bristoe Station, Rap- 
pahannock Station, Aline Run, Fredericks- 
burg, Chancellorsville, Wilderness, Spottsyl- 
vania. Laurel Hill, Bethesda Church, Cold 
Harbor, four engagements at Petersburg and 
two at Yellow House. 

From 1864 to 1866 Mr. Cribfcs followed 
blacksmithiug at Oil City, thence moving to 
Heshbon, in Brushvalley township, Indiana 
county, where he continued to work at his 
trade until 1875. That year he bought the 
Palmer farm of 106 acres in West Wheatfield 
township, and besides cultivating that prop- 
erty he worked at his trade, having a shop 
opposite his home. He gave up blacksmith- 
iug in 1907. Mr. Cribbs has given particular 
attention to the raising of small fruits, in 
which he is quite extensively interested, though 
he follows general farming very successfully. 
He has done well at his various undertakings, 
and has also taken part in the administration 
of public affairs in the township, having served 
twelve years as justice of the peace, and he 
also held the office of school director for ten 
years, and was secretary and treasurer of the 
"board. In 1890 he was census enumerator. 
He has been a prominent worker in the M. E. 
Church at Heshbon, serving as trustee and 
class leader, and was superintendent of the 
Sunday school. Sociallv he holds membership 
in Findley Patch Post," No. 137, G. A. R., of 
Blairsville, Indiana county. 

Mr. Cribbs was married April 20, 1865, to 
Sarali Elizabeth Palmer, daughter of Henry 
and Sarah Ann (Oaks) Palmer, formerly of 
Burrell township, this county, and five chil- 
dren have been born to them, namely: (1) 
Harry Albert is a civil engineer by profession, 
but is now employed as chief clerk of the 
Northern Pacific Railroad Company, at St. 
Paul, Minn. He married Gertrude Hoskinson, 
and their children are Ernest, Margaret, A^ir- 
ginia, George and William. (2) William B. 
0. is engaged in farming in Shelby county, 
Ind. He married Eva Limpus, and has chil- 
dren, Edith and Irene. (3) Orrin L., station 
master for the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany at Dunbar, Pa., married Clara Wake- 
field, and their children are Bertha, Grace, 
George and Kenneth. (4) Charles Ci'ocker is 



832 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



deceased. (5) Clarence Alexander Scott, who 
works with his brother at Dunbar, Pa., mar- 
ried Dora i\Iaek, and their children are Fran- 
cis, May, Merwin and Harry Mack. 

CHARLES W. TUCK, of Homer City, In- 
diana countj^, senior member of the manu- 
facturing firm known as the L. C. Hassinger 
Company, has been connected with that busi- 
ness throughout his residence in Homer City 
and is one of the best-known of this section's 
lumbermen and mill men. 

Mr. Tuck is a native of Maine, born at 
Houlton, Aroostook count}-, in February, 
1849, son of Lafayette Tuck, who was a well- 
known lumber manufacturer of that section 
of the Pine Tree State and who was for years 
engaged in the lumber business in Pennsyl- 
vania, later removing to the Pacific coast and 
locating in Washington, where he died. Mr. 
Tuck 's educational opportunities were limited 
to such as the local school of his native town 
afforded. He was but twelve years old when 
he first started to work, in a sawmill with his 
father at his native place, where he continued 
until 1869. Then he came west to Indiana 
county, about four months before his father, 
with whom he became engaged in the lumber 
business, also operating a sawmill at Diamoud- 
ville for twelve years. It was then he came 
to Homer City and became manager in the 
planing mill of J. M. Guthrie, with whom he 
continued until 1895, a period of fourteen 
years, at the end of which he formed a partner- 
ship with the sous of IMr. Guthrie, with whom 
he was associated in business until 1908, their 
product being handles, insulator pins and 
brackets. "When the Guthrie brothers sold 
out their interest to L. C. Hassinger, of In- 
diana, Mr. Tuck continued with the business 
as senior member of the firm, and it is now 
conducted under the name of the L. C. Has- 
singer Company. Many improvements have 
been made in the plant and equipment in the 
thirty years and more of Mr. Tuck's associa- 
tion with it, and the business has so increased 
that ten hands are now given steady employ- 
ment. 

Mr. Tuck is a thorough lumberman, having 
been in the business over half a century, and 
he is a man of expert judgment in his line and 
thoroughly familiar with the demands of the 
trade. 

In 1871 Mr. Tuck was married, in Cherry- 
hill township. Indiana county, to Nora L. 
Sickenbirger, daughter of Henty Sickenbirger, 
and they have had six children: Gertrude, a 
music teacher, who lives at home; Lafayette; 



Laura, who was a public school teacher, now 
the wife of Edward Gonier; Mabel, at home; 
Clyde, a railroad man ; and Eleanor, a school 
teacher, ilr. Tuck is a member of the Presby- 
terian Church and actively interested in its 
work, serving as trustee. He is inclined to- 
ward the principles of the Republican party, 
but independent on vital issues. 

JOHN G. McCRORY, president of the J. 
G. JlcCrory Company, now operating over one 
hundred 5 and 10 cent stores situated princi- 
pally in the eastern and southern part of the 
country, was the founder of this great con- 
cern and is its principal stockholder. Its de- 
velopment has been a great part of his life 
work, and his best thought and best ideas have 
gone into its upbuilding. From an unosten- 
tatious beginning at Scottdale, Westmoreland 
Co., Pa., in 1882, when he started what proved 
to be the first link of a long chain of stores, 
he has built up a business whose success lias 
brought it national reputation, and this section 
is proud of its connection therewith as the 
starting point of a business which has as- 
sumed vast proportions. In many respects 
the McCrory corporation is unique. There 
are other successful enterprises of the kind, 
but its evolution has been along lines sug- 
gested by experience or proved by trial, iind 
the result is an organization of such amaz- 
ing efficiency that it is not onlj' automatic in 
operation, but in self-perpetuation and ex- 
pansion as well. Mr. McCrory has gathered 
around him in this association a group of 
able men, whose cooperation makes possible 
the maximum of achievement with the mini- 
mum of labor. The record of his life is one 
of unceasing activity. He has always ex- 
erted himself to make the most of whatever 
opportunities have been at hand, and though 
willing to venture forward has built up his 
business conservatively, on such a sound 
basis that added responsibilities have entailed 
extra work but no worry. He comes of that 
substantial race from the North of Ireland 
whose representatives have become known 
in Pennsylvania for thrift, shrewdness and 
strength of intellect, coupled with a hardiness 
of physique which adapted them admirably 
for the struggle against adverse conditions 
which the early emigrants faced. 

John McCrory, grandfather of John G. IMc- 
Crory, was the founder of the family in In- 
diana county. He was a native of County 
Down, Ireland, born in 1788 near the town 
of Armagh, and his wife Jennie or Jane 
(Campbell), daughter of Christ.y and Jennie 





'^^rW^ 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



833 



Campbell, was born in 1789. He came to tbis 
country about 1814, a young man of twenty- 
six, and that year settled on land in East 
■Wheatfield township, Indiana Co., Pa. He 
was one of the founders of the United Pres- 
byterian Church, at Bethel, in West Wheat- 
field township, and was one of the officials of 
that church to the close of his life. He died 
Sept. 29, 1867, aged seventy-nine years, and 
was buried with his wife in the Bethel Church 
cemetery; she died Sept. 25, 1864, aged sev- 
enty-five years. Eight children were born to 
this couple, as follows: Elizabeth, Oct. 2, 
1818 (married Joseph Mack) ; David, Jan. 
14, 1820; Jennie, May 17, 1821 (died Oct. 28, 
1857) ; James, Nov. 17, 1822 (died Jan. 20, 
1826) ; Mary Ann, March 23, 1824 (married 
Hugh Mack) ; Nancy, May 9, 1827 (married 
James McGriffin, of Jefferson county. Pa.) ; 
James, Nov. 23, 1829; Isabelle, Oct. 11, 1831 
(died Sept. 19, 1844). 

Grandfather McCrory was a Mason and 
when leaving Ireland for America a letter was 
given him by his lodge, No. 683, at Armahill, 
Ireland. Said letter is still in the possession 
of the grandchildren and shows he was well 
advanced in Masonry. 

James McCrory, youngest son of John and 
Jennie (Campbell) McCrory, was born Nov. 
23, 1829, in East Wheatfield township. He 
grew up on a farm in the same township, ad- 
joining the place where he was born. He was 
reared to farming, and followed agricultural 
pursuits until he entered the service of his 
country, Nov. 2, 1862, during the Civil war. 
He became a member of Company K, 177th 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, under Cap- 
tain Killin and Lieut. Col. Hugh J. Brady. 
He was taken ill, and died March 5, 1863, near 
Suffolk, Va., leaving his young wife with two 
children, John G., then in his third year, and 
Jennie, less than a year old. The remains 
were brought to Indiana county and buried in 
the Bethel United Presbyterian Church ceme- 
tery. Mr. James McCrory had married Mary 
A. Murphy, who was born June 28, 1834, 
near Mechanicsburg, Brushvalle.y township, 
daughter of George and Margaret I. Murphy. 
She survived him many years, dying March 
16, 1900, and is also buried in the Bethel 
Church cemetery. A few years after her hus- 
band's death Mrs. McCrory moved with her 
children to Mechanicsburg, to take advantage 
of the better school facilities offered and to be 
nearer church, remaining there until her son 
reached the age of eighteen years. Then she 
returned to the farm. Later the daughter 
married John H. McCullough, then of DuBois, 



Pa., who is now associated in business with 
her brother John G. McCrory, being vice 
president of the J. G. ilcCrory Company and 
equally interested with Mr. McCrory in ax- 
tensive investments in Florida lands and other 
real estate. Mr. and Mrs. McCullough live in 
Orlando, Fla., and have two children, Mary 
and Ruth. 

John G. McCrory was born Oct. 11, 3860, 
in Indiana county. Pa. His boyhood and 
youth were spent in and about Mechanicsburg, 
where he received a public school education, 
engaging in vacation time with farmers or aa 
clerk of a country store, and when a youth 
of eighteen he returned with his mother to the 
farm. However, he did not remain there 
long. Finding employment in the mills of 
the Cambria Steel Company, at Johnstown, 
Pa., he soon was given a position in their large 
general store, then conducted under the name 
of Wood, Morrell & Company (James Mc- 
Millen then manager), where he remained 
about two years, and thus began his career as 
a merchant. He had faith in the openings 
which the small towns in the vicinity afforded, 
and was anxious to have an independent ca- 
reer, so with what money he had saved and 
some borrowed — but a few hundred dollars 
in all — he opened in Scottdale, Westinoreland 
Co., Pa., what he called a 5 and Id Cent 
Store, using side counters for this line, but 
handling also some higher priced merchan- 
dise. This was in 1882. The idea appealed 
to the residents of the locality. And by hard 
work of 1 he young man to please liis customers 
and keep his expenses within limits, he by the 
next year had accumulated enough capital to 
take advantage of the second opening, which 
was in the town of DuBois, Clearfield Co., Pa. 
He started this store in 1883, almost clear of 
debt, and his subsequent operations no doubt 
owe much of their profitableness to this pol- 
icy, to which he has adhered. He disposed of 
his Scottdale store to good advantage soon 
after he established the DuBois store, but as 
a matter of sentiment and respect for the lo- 
cality of his first venture he marked the spot 
by reestablishing a store in Scottdale Dec. 15, 
1910. The DuBois store was discontinued in 
the year 1892 but reopened Sept. 9, 1912. 

Many more stores were opened and closed 
during the first ten years of Mr. McCrory 's 
business career. His game those days was to 
open two or three stores each year and close 
out that many, aiming to make money at both 
times, always having from eight to twelve 
stores going. A slump from high to low prices 
on some lines of goods was taken advantage 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



834 

of about then, but the time came when there 
was less opportunity to buy low and throw 
out bargains with profit, and besides a desire 
to control more stores made it necessary to dis 
continue handling the higher priced goods as 
the chance to lose by leakage on perishable 
and seasonable goods became greater each time 
an additional store was acquired. 

The first store handling 5 and 10 cent goods 
exclusively was opened at Lawrence, Mass., 
about the year 1891, and a Uttle later the 
second one was opened at Jamestown, N. ^. 
From this beginning to the present the busi- 
ness has had a record of unbroken prosperity. 
After he had established a number of stores 
in Pennsylvania, Mr. McCrory found oppor- 
tunities in neighboring States. His activity 
brought him again and again to the discovery 
of available sites and fields for business too 
good to be ignored, and the accumulated prof- 
its of each" new store gave him capital to 
widen his interests constantly. 

To save continual renewing of leases, also 
safeguard against chance to undermine on 
same, it became necessary to rent for long 
periods and today the property not owned 
outright is generally leased on twenty-one- 
year terms, or longer. 

Thus he kept adding to his string of estab- 
lishments until now they are to be found in 
most States east of the ilississippi. Hardly 
a year passed but several new stores were 
opened, and the growth in recent years has 
been so rapid as to be phenomenal. Yet 
the increase has been normal in every respect, 
its wonderful expansion within the last few 
years being only the result of the system which 
has been undergoing steady improvement un- 
til its workings now seem to be practically 
perfect. 

To illustrate the remarkable expansion of 



late years, we quote from a statement 
in 1912, showing forty-eight stores in 1907 
and 1908. forty-nine in 1909, sixty-one in 
1910, sixty-nine in 1911 and eighty-one in 
operation "early in 1912. In May, 1913. there 
are 112 stores, and eight new locations en- 
gaged; annual volume of business about 
$8,000,000. The sales for the first half of 
1912 (fiscal year) showed an increase of thir- 
ty-six and a half per cent over the same period 
in 1911— the greatest increase known in this 
line of business. Neither is there anything 
small about the expenses. For instance, taxes 
paid into the difi'erent towns where stores are 
located run at least ,$35,000 annually, not in- 
cluding the corporation and other taxes. An- 
nual rent bills alone amount to more than a 



half million ; and three million dollars ' worth 
of fire insurance is carried by the company. 

In 1912 the J. G. McCrory Company was 
incorporated under the laws of the State of 
Delaware, and the business was turned over 
to same by Mr. McCrory. The following of- 
ficers are now in control: J. G. McCrory, 
president; J. H. McCullough, first vice presi- 
dent; B. L. Horner, second vice president; 
F. D. Jolly, third vice president and treas- 
urer; P. A. Prior, secretary; W. M. Cleaver, 
comptroller. The board of directors consists 
of J. G. McCrory, B. E. McSheehy, W. W. 
JIcLellan, B. L. Horner, W. M. Cleaver, E. E. 
Holmes and W.' J. Maloney, with J. G. Mc- 
Crory, B. E. McSheehy and W. W. McLellan 
as members of the executive committee. Most 
of the men in whom the administration of the 
business rests have, like the founder, devoted 
the better part of their lives to its advance- 
ment, and have long been associated with 
him. Each is a specialist in his own line. 
The concern has now an authorized capital of 
$10,000,000, common stock $7,000,000, pre- 
ferred stock $3,000,000, practically all of the 
common stock being owned by jMr. McCrory. 
The fact that he is willing to keep the princi- 
pal part of his own investments in the busi- 
ness is the best evidence of his faith in its 
stability and prospects of continued earning 
power. 

The ]\IcCrory headquarters for some years 
was at DuBois, Pa., but when the stores were 
about fourteen in number ofiSces were opened 
at Johnstown, Pa., and when about forty in 
number, trips to the cities were so frequent 
that it became necessary to move the offices to 
New York. 

About three thousand people are now on 
the company's pay roll, and more than a hun- 
dred in the general offices and purchasing de- 
partment, which is situated at No. 621 Broad- 
way, New York City. Mr. JlcCrory has al- 
ways been liberal in his treatment of em- 
ployees, and the relations between them have 
been cordial. 

Mr. McCrory has also been very active in 
real estate and it is a question if the natural 
increased value on real estate, together with 
rents collected from same (up to within the 
last few years") was not equal to the profit 
from stores. Early he discovered the close re- 
lation existing between inside (or best) real 
estate and the up-to-date retail store and came 
to know that in order to locate retail stores 
and make each a sure success, meant to ac- 
quire a correct knowledge of city real estate 
and actual value of same. The vast fields 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 835 

to be covered gave unlimited opportunity for Lawrence Co., Pa. Two children have been 

thorough knowledge which was not overlooked, born to this marriage, Lois Jean and Eunice 

but comparisons of location, value and prices Marjorie. 

for best spots in various towns of the States vir rr 

was continualb' going on, and manv fine prop- _, ^yLLIAM HARVEY GEORGE, a well-to- 

erties in thrifty, rapid growing towns were ^'^ if™^^' °\ Armstrong township, Indiana 

purchased outright instead of being closed on ?°o^f^' '^'^, ^'^^ ^V u* township April 2, 

a rental basis. Establishing his owh store al- l^ll'T^'i^ZZ if p'°'^'' '""f ^' '' 

T ,, J. ^- £ . J 1 ^ gi eat-graudson ot James George, who was 

ways made that portion of rentsure and col- tJie first of this family to come to America, 

lections easy At the time of mcoiToratmg, j^^^es George was a native of Ireland, and 

twenty-odd, but not all, of these city prop- „-as only a small boy when he worked his way 

erties were turned over to the company. over the ocean, on a sailing vessel, landing in 

Coal and timber lands have also had their the new world with just one shilling in his 

attractions, in some cases appealing to Mr. Mc- pocket. Being entirely without friends he 

Crory so that heavy investments have been was soon obliged to part with that, spending 

made. One of the Florida purchases is es- his last penny for a crust of bread and a tin 

pecially interesting. Some years ago ninety- of buttermilk, but he soon found work, and 

eight thousand acres of pine and cypress tim- before long had succeeded in saving enough 

her lands located in Orange and Osceola coun- money to bring him over the Allegheny moun- 

ties, Fla., were jointly purchased by him tarns into western Pennsylvania. He stopped 

and his brother-in-law, Mr. J. H. McCulloui?h, ^^ar New Alexandria, on the Loyalhanna 

embracing a continuous tract six miles wide feek m ^\ estmorelaud county, where he ob- 

by more than twenty-seven miles in length. !wLr^ "^ .^lioPPi^g timber and 

L^r, twenty thousand acres were put under ^:-l^;:^fZ^^ ^Z! ^^ 

fence, now being used as a cattle ranch. The ^p 300 acres of land for himself near Snod- 

timber stall remains m its virgin or original g^ggs's Mills, where he builf a stone house, 

state. using the small stones found on the place. 

The Florida East Coast Railroad (known Working early and late he managed to clear a 

as the Henry M. Flagler Road) has just com- farm and make a home for his family, and he 

pleted a new line to Lake Okeechobee within lived to enjoy the fruits of his labor, reaching 

the last year, passing over this tract for a a ripe old age. In religion he was a Presby- 

distance of twenty miles, locating three sta- terian, in politics a Democrat. He married 

tions about six miles apart. Mr. McCrory and Maiy McClure, of Westmoreland county, and 

Mr. McCuUough at the same time built a rail- they had eight children : Polly, who married 

road of their own, starting at one of the sta- Robert Woodward; Sally, who married Wil- 

tions mentioned and extending a distance of ^^^ Trimble ; Martha, who married William 

ten miles toward the town of Orlando (county h'^^'^^'^ll' of Indiana proprietor of the old 



seat of Orange county). It is intended to ^^GompersHoM"; Eliza, who married 

continue the road later on to Orlando. S°''l''^,f Westmoreland county ; John, 

Mr. McCrory has always been interested in ^Ltl^TLrfZ':^^. Ja^rof TrS: 

churches and the cause of religion, and he ^He, Pa.; and William, who remained on the 

has been a most liberal contributor, not only homestead, caring for his parents 

to churches in the place of his nativity, but in John George, son of James and Mary (Me- 

many other localities. He has also given Clure) George, was born Jan. 30, 1799, and 

generously to the Y. M. C. A. in many lo- was a^oung man when he located in Arm- 

ealities. strong township, Indiana county, on a tract 

On April 26, 1893, Mr. McCrory married of 250 acres where he first erected a hewed log 

Lillie May Peters, daughter of Rev. Cering house. He cleared the land and continued to 

and Hanna (Ryde) Peters, of DuBois, Pa., make improvements until by his industry and 

and she died April 16, 1902, leaving one son, thrift he had established a good home, and 

Van Clair, now (1913) seventeen years of there he spent the rest of his life as a farmer, 

age ; he is attending school. On Dec. 8, 1904, dying at the age of eighty years. His wife' 

Mr. McCrory married (second) Carrie May Mary (Brown), daughter" of Walter Brown' 

McGiU, daughter of Rev. John Anderson and was born Dec. 28, 1808, in England, and came 

Belinda (Clark) McGill, of New Wilmington, to America with her parents when twelve 



836 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



years old. She was noted for her intelligence 
and many sterling qualities, and her fine pen- 
manship won much admiration. Mrs. George 
died on the homestead at the age of sixty-one 
years, and she and her husband are buried 
side by side in the Jacksonville cemetery. 
They were members of the Presbyterian 
Church. In politics Mr. George was a Demo- 
crat. The following children were bom to 
this couple : Selina, born April 4, 1830, mar- 
ried Leasure McKean, of Janette, Pa. ; James 
Walter, twin of Selina, is mentioned below; 
Eveline Emma, born Sept. 5, 1833, is the 
widow of Elliott Thompson, and resides in 
Pocahontas, Iowa ; Walter Bates, born Oct. 2, 
1835, is fully mentioned elsewhere in this 
work ; Hannah Mary, born Feb. 5, 1838, mar- 
ried Ephraim Davis and (second) a Mr. Cun- 
ningham, and resides in Janette, Pa. ; Phebe 
Elizabeth, born Dec. 24, 1840, died March 17, 
1847; William Harvey, born April 29, 1843, 
died Dec. 31, 1862 ; Martha Ann, born June 
3, 1846, died Jan. 1, 1863; John Alexander, 
born Feb. 22, 1850, a retired railroad man, is 
now residing in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 

James Walter George, son of John, was 
born April 4, 1830, in Armstrong township, 
Indiana coiinty, and there received his educa- 
tion in the common schools. He did farm 
work until his marriage, after which he 
"cropped" part of his father's farm until he 
bought the place upon which he settled, erect- 
ing a log house and barn as his first improve- 
ments in the way of buildings. Later he pur- 
chased the Alexander Lucas farm of 110 acres, 
and subsequently acquired 221 acres more, be- 
coming extensively interested in farming, 
which he followed there the remainder of his 
days. He not only managed his own affairs 
with notable success, but was prominent in 
all township matters, acting as supervisor of 
roads, and school director, and was one of the 
founders of Bethel Presbvterian Church, 
which he served as elder and member of the 
building committee. Politically he was a Re- 
publican. His death occurred Sept. 9, 1906, 
and he was buried in Oakland cemetery. 

Mr. George married Elizabeth Hamilton, 
who was bom Oct. 28, 1838, in Center' town- 
ship, where she gi-ew up on the farm now- 
occupied bv W. Bates Georee, mentioned else- 
where in this work. Her parents were Thomas 
and Ann (Johnston) Hamilton. Mr. and 
Mrs. George had the following familv: Mary- 
Ann, born Jan. 28, 1861. married William M. 
George, a carpenter, and resides in Spnne- 
dale. Pa.: Nancy Ella, bora June 4. 18R2, 
married William Barkley, deceased; Sarah 



Emma, born Jan. 27, 1864, lives at home; 
Thomas H., born Oct. 17, 1865, a farmer, mar- 
ried Jennie Davis; Martha Jane, born Nov. 
23, 1867, married G. C. Devinney, a farmer of 
Armstrong township ; William H. is mentioned 
below ; John Alexander, born April 28, 1870, 
died in September, 1870 ; Lizzie M., born July 

21, 1872, is at home ; James W., born Aug. 10, 
1873, is at home; Robert Gill, born Aug. 25, 
1875, is at home ; Harry Milton, born Sept. 

22, 1876, is at home ; Maggie Bell, born Feb. 
5, 1879, died March 7, 1880 ; Murray Henry, 
born May 27, 1883, is at home. The mother 
of this family continues to reside at the home- 
stead with her children, who are caring for 
her tenderly in her declining years. 

William Harvey George grew to manhood 
in Armstrong township, where he attended 
public school. In his early manhood he did 
fami work for others, being in the employ of 
G. H. Cribbs, in Blacklick township, one year, 
and afterward with N. S. Rankin in Center 
township until Feb. 16, 1893, when he bought 
a tract of forty-five acres, part of the Barkley 
tract, known as the William Barkley farm, in 
Armstrong township, to which he removed, 
residing there until 1905. In that year he 
settled upon the Michael Lowman farm of 140 
acres in Armstrong township, which he pur- 
chased, and here he has since engaged in farm- 
ing. Mr. George has made numerous improve- 
ments on his place, adding steadily to its 
value during his ownership. Like his father 
he has been active in public affaii-s and church 
work, having been school director of the town- 
ship for the last five years, and being a mem- 
ber and trustee of Bethel Presbyterian Church. 
In political sentiment he is a Progressive Re- 
publican. 

On Feb. 16, 1893, Mr. George was married 
to Mary Schurr, who was born Aug. 26, 1864, 
daughter of John Frederick and Christina 
(Walker) Schurr. and they have four chil- 
dren, born as follows: Lizzie C, Dec. 22, 
1893; James Walter, Nov. 27, 1895: Harry 
Lawrence, Oct. 13, 1897; and Annie May, 
Aug. 19, 1900. 

ELBIE E. CREPS was born on a farm in 
Rayne township, Indiana Co., Pa., Feb. 20, 
1886, and is the son of J. A. and IMinnie A. 
Creps, nee Ray, the daughter of Robert Ray, 
of Rayne township. Jacob Creps. the grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch, was 
prominent in the affairs of Indiana county 
during his lifetime, having held the office of 
sheriff of the county, was a member for two 
terms of the Legislature of the State, and 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



837 



having served with distinction in the Civil 
war as captain of Company A, 61st Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, besides being connected 
with many business enterprises in the county. 
He died in 1891, at the age of fifty-four yeai-s. 
His son, J. A. Creps, father of Elbie E. Creps, 
died April 8, 1913, aged fifty years, while in 
the auditor general's department of the State, 
with which he had been connected for a period 
of eight years. His widow, Minnie A. Creps, 
and these children survive him: Mrs. James 
Manners, Elbie E., Howard D. and Florence 
Creps. 

The sub.iect of this sketch received his early 
education in the old "Creps school" in Rayne 
township, and upon removing to Indiana, Pa., 
with his family, entered the high school, from 
which he graduated in 1901. He completed 
the course at the Indiana State normal school 
in 1904, and later attended Pennsylvania 
College, at Gettysburg, Pa., for two years. 
He was for two years a student in the law 
department of the University of Pennsylvania 
at Philadelphia, and in October, 1912, was 
admitted to the bar of the Supreme court. 
He is now engaged in the practice of law at 
Indiana, Pa., being a member of the firm of 
Langham, Elkin & Creps. 

REV. HARRY WHITE MAGUIRE, pas- 
tor of the Lutheran Church at Cookport, 
Indiana Co., Pa., was born in Young town- 
ship, this county, Feb. 26, 1873, son of Elliott 
and Sarah (White) Maguire. 

William Maguire, his paternal grandfather, 
was one of the early settlers of Indiana 
county, a pioneer school teacher and subse- 
quently a farmer. 

Elliott Maguire, son of William, and father 
of Rev. Harry W. Maguire, was born in Green 
township, Indiana county, and during his 
early years followed the business of tanning. 
Eventually he took up a farm and located 
at Eldersridge, in Young township, where he 
was engaged in agricultural pursuits during 
the remainder of his life, his death occurring 
in March, 1901. He was a personal friend of 
Judge Harry White, after whom his son Rev. 
Harry White Maguire was named. Mr. 
Maguire married Sarah White, and she died 
in 1889, the mother of seven sons and four 
daughters, the eldest o:^ the family being 
Joseph, a resident of Apollo, Pa., where he is 
chief of police; the others were: Scott, Jamea 
and John, who are deceased; David, a resi- 
dent of Salina, Westmoreland county; Mat- 
thew, a resident of Loxley, Ala. ; Rev. Harry 
White ; Mary, wife of Benjamin Shearer, and 



now deceased ; Harriet, who first married Wil- 
liam Caldwell (deceased) and is now the wife 
of J. W. Starry, a resident of Jeannette, Pa. ; 
Sarali, the wife of David Watt, of Windber, 
Pa., and Margaret, the wife of Rev. J. W. 
Shafi'er, of Homer City, Pennsylvania. 

Henry White, the maternal grandfather 
of Rev. Harry W. Maguire, was of English 
descent, and was born in Indiana county, a 
member of a pioneer family of this section 
who settled on the present site of Saltsburg, 
in Blacklick township, where Mr. White was 
engaged in farming all his life. 

Harry W. Maguire was educated in the 
public schools of Eldersridge, in Young town- 
ship, and at Eldersridge Academy, and as a 
young man was engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits. Subsequently removing to Pittsburg, 
Mr. I\Iaguire was there associated with the 
Bell Telephone Company for fifteen years, 
meantime also engaging in missionary work 
in that city. In this way he became interested 
in ministerial work, and eventually he be- 
came a student at the Susquehanna Uni- 
versity and prepared for the ministry. His 
first charge was the Lutheran Church at 
Yatesboro, in Armstrong county, but after 
two years there, in 1910, he came to Cook- 
port as supply pastor, a position which he 
has since filled to the entire satisfaction of 
his congregation. He belongs to Shinley Park 
Lodge, "No. 1036, I. 0. 0. F., of which he is 
a past grand ; is a past chief patron of the I. 
0. O. F., at Pittsburg; and belongs to Pitts- 
burg Commandery, Knights of Malta. 

JAMES CHAPMAN, who for many years 
has been engaged in agricultural pursuits in 
North Mahoning township, was born Sept. 15, 
1839, in County Tyrone, Ireland, son of 
James and Mary (Rogers) Chapman. 

James Chapman, the father, was bom in 
County Monaghan, Ireland, there grew to 
manhood, and married Mary Rogers, of 
County Tyrone. He was engaged in farming 
in his" native laud until 1849. in which year 
he emigrated to the United States, locating 
first in Pittsburg, Pa., where he was em- 
ployed by Zugg, Lindsay & Company until 
18a6. In that year he went to Porter town- 
ship, Jefferson county, where he secured 
seventy acres of land, and this he continued 
to cultivate until his retirement, in 1895, 
after which he made his home with his son 
James until his death, in 1899, at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety years. His wife passed 
away in April, 1898, when eighty-eight years 
of age. They were members of the Fourth 



838 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



United Presbyterian Church of Pittsburg. 
Ten children were born to them, as follows : 
Eliza, who died in 1850 ; Margaret, who mar- 
ried David Elkin, of South Mahoning town- 
ship, both now deceased ; John, twin of James, 
who served in Company I. 78th Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry, and was killed at 
the battle of Stone River, Dec. 31, 1862; 
James; Robert and William, who both died 
of cholera while at sea on the family's journey 
to this country; Mary, who died in infancy; 
Henry, who served in Company F, 9th Penn- 
sylvania Reserves, during the Civil war. and 
was killed at the battle of Antietam. Sept. 
17, 1862; Sarah, deceased, who was the wife 
of Andrew Fleming; and Ellen, who died in 
infancy. 

James Chapman was ten years of age when 
he accompanied his parents to the United 
States, and while residing in Pittsburg was 
employed as a nail cutter by the firm of ' 
Graff, Bennett & Company. In 1869 he came 
to West Mahoning township, Indiana county, 
where he purchased a farm, but five yeara 
later sold it and purchased the Hoover place, 
in North Mahoning township, a tract of 100 
acres on which he has since made his home. 
In 1884 he erected a modern house, and in 
1905 built the large substantial barn, in addi- 
tion to which he has made numerous other 
improvements. His land is well cultivated 
and he is justly considered one of the leading 
agriculturists of his township. 

On Jan. 12, 1865, Mr. Chapman was united 
in marriage with Sarah Elkin, of County 
Tyrone, Ireland, daughter of William and 
Martha (Beattie) Elkin. of that county. 
Mrs. Elkin died in Ireland, and her husband 
subsequently came to the United States and 
located in the Loop, in West Mahoning town- 
ship. By his first marriage ilr. Elkin had 
ten children, namely: Francis, father of 
Judge John P. Elkin, a sketch of whom ap- 
pears elsewhere in this work; Eliza, who 
married John Bond and (second) Benjamin 
Barrett, and both are deceased; William, liv- 
ing in West Mahoning township ; James, also 
a resident of that township ; Henry, who died 
in August, 1912, in Pittsburg; Annie, who 
married Spencer Barrett, of Wendell, Idaho ; 
John, who died in infancy; Sarah, who mar- 
ried Mr. Chapman; John (2), who died in 
infancy; and Mary, who is deceased. Mr. 
Elkin 's second marriage was to Jane Rippey, 
of County Tyrone, Ireland, who died in 1892, 
and he followed her to the grave in May,- 
1896. They were the parents of three chil- 
dren, as follows: David, who is living on 



the homestead place: flattie, the widow of 
Thomas Ralston, of Brockwayville, Pa. ; and 
John, living on a part of the old place. 

The children born to ]\Ir. and Mrs. Chap- 
man were as follows; (1) John, M. D.. edu- 
cated in the Cleveland, Ohio, and Louisville, 
Ky., schools, has practiced medicine at Fly, 
Ohio, Shirley, W. Va., and Jacksonburg, W. 
Va., at which latter place he is known as a 
leading physician and surgeon. He married 
Rosie Underwood, and has two children, Anna 
and Walter. (2) William died at the age of 
seventeen years, eleven months. (3) James 
F., a graduate of the normal school, class of 
1896, was for sixteen years a teacher, and is 
now county superintendent of schools of 
Indiana county and a resident of Indiana 
borough. He married Bessie Cunningham, 
and has one child, Harriet. (4) Ellen ^M. was 
formerly a teacher until her marriage to 
Joseph H. Wingert, of Caneadea, N. Y., by 
whom she has one son, Wallace. (5) Joseph, 
a farmer of Caneadea, married Grace Burr, 
and has three children, Lawrence, Averell 
and Zelda. (6) Anna resides with her par- 
ents. (7) Wallace C, living at Indiana. Pa., 
graduated from the Indiana State Normal 
school in 1899, taught school four years, at- 
tended Dickinson Law School, at Carlisle, Pa., 
and was admitted to the Indiana county liar 
in 1905. He married Lottie Smith, and has 
two children, Martha and Charlotte. (8) 
David, W'ho is assisting his father in the work 
of the home farm, was married Dec. 30, 1908, 
to Ella Blose, of Perry township, Jefferson 
county, daughter of Addison Blose, and has 
one son, Arthur C, born jMarch 22, 1910. 

Mr. Chapman has been residing on his 
present property' since 1874, and during that 
long period has gained and maintained a 
reputation for the strictest integrity. A man 
of high principles, with profound respect for 
the value of hard work, he has conducted 
himself in such a manner as to gain the good 
will and friendship of a wide circle of ac- ^ 
quaintances. He has lived a clean, upright 
life, and in spite of his seventy-three years is 
in full possession of his faculties and attends 
to his business matters in the same able man- 
ner that brought him success in his younger 
days. In political matters he is a Republican, 
and his fellow citizens have honored him with 
election to public office, he having rendered 
his community valued services as a member 
of the school board of his township. With his 
family he holds membership in the Lutheran 
Church, and has manv friends in the con- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 839 

gregation of that faith at Trade City, of Dr. William A. Simpson, residence and 
Pennsylvania-. office of Judge Elkin, residence of Dr. M. M. 

Davis, residence of J. M. Stewart, residence 
ELSWORTH M. LOCKARD, who does the of M. C. Watson, the Lutheran church (de 
most extensive business in his line, contract- signed and remodeled), J. W. Clements' resi 
ing and building, in Indiana, is a native of deuce (designed), residences of R. E. Young, 
Indiana county, born in 1862 in Cheri-yhill William C. McGregor, Edwai-d Rowe, W. P 
township. His grandfather, Robert Lockard, Wettling, J. C. Wallace, A. S. Wallace, J. L, 
was born in Indiana county, of Scotch par- Getty, Harry McCreary, S. J. St. Clair, A, 
entage, was a shoemaker by trade, and died W. Mabon, Dr. J. M. Torrence, J. E. Powell, 
in 1869. He married Naomi Bagley. J. G. Fleming, J. P., T. E. A. Dugan, Charles 

Hiram R. Lockard, father of Elsworth M. A. Gessler, R. E. Forester, and the Y. M. C 
Lockard, was a lumberman during the greater A. building, which latter was started April 
part of his life. He mai-ried Susan Mock, 20, 1912 ; Mr. Lockard is not only the designer 
daughter of Peter Mock, who was born in and builder of this structure, but was also 
Bedford county, Pa., and followed sawmilling one of the four largest contributors toward 
and lumbering for many j^ears. Mrs. Susan its erection. This list will give a general 
(Mock) Lockard was also a descendant of the idea of the wide patronage which he enjoys 
Carrolltons of CarroUton. She died Nov. 13, and the extensive business he has acquired. 
1889, and Mr. Lockard died Aug. 31, 1909. it is almost needless to say that his reputa- 
They were the parents of nine children: tion has been established upon a foundation 
Lincoln M. ; Elsworth M. ; Alma M., wife of of honorable work and reliable dealing which 
S. A. McCoy ; Dr. Wilmer G. ; A. Kate, wife of has never been called into question in any of 
■ John I. Bueher; Clara G., widow of Andrew his transactions. His high character would 
S. Lockard ; Ralph W. ; Robert S., and Madge give him prestige in any community. He 
E., wife of E. A. AVeller. has always been specially interested in the 

Elsworth M. Lockard attended public school question of public education, and has served 
in Indiana county and later continued his as school director of Indiana borough for over 
studies under a private tutor. Then he en- fifteen years, serving for eight consecutive 
tered Coleman's business college, at Newark, years of that time as president of the board; 
N. J., and on May 7, 1879, began his appren- at present he is secretary of the county board 
ticeship to the carpenter's trade under John of school directors. His work has been pub- 
E. Miller, with whom he remained for a lie-spirited and effective, and is highly appre- 
period of eight years. He then engaged in ciated by his fellow citizens, 
business for himself, at Cookport, Indiana On July 23, 1885, Mr. Lockard was mar- 
county, where he remained about one year, pied to Nancy Elizabeth Daugherty, daughter 
During the winter of 1886-87 he taught of Evert Daugherty, who was a soldier during 
school. On March 27, 1887, he located at the Civil war, serving nearly four years, dur- 
Indiana, where he has since had his home, ing part of which time he was in the 7th 
After working one year for Klingensmith & Pennsylvania Cavalry. Mr. and Mrs. Lock- 
Hastings, during which time he was foreman ^rd have three children : ilary, who is a 
on the construction of the new^ jail of Indiana public school teacher at Johnstown, Pa. ; 
county, he began contracting on his own ac- Margaret, also a teacher, at Franklin, Cam- 
count, in the spring of 1889. In the twenty hria county, near Johnstown; and Donald W. 
four years which have elapsed since he has The family are Presbyterians, 
put up more buildings, and done more gen- 
eral business in the line of contracting and DAVID WALKER RARAIGH, farmer of 
building, than any other man in the town of South Mahoning township, Indiana county, 
Indiana. Among the many structures upon ^nd director and vice president of the Plum- 
which he has been engaged, either as builder yille National Bank, was born on the home- 
or remodeler and designer, we mention the stead farm of his family, near the Armstrong 
First National bank, the Deposit bank, the county line, June 15, 1868. 
Farmers' bank, the Citizens' National bank, The Raraigh family is of German extrac- 
the Episcopal church and parsonage, the tion, but the founder in America is not def- 
Leonard Hall of the State normal school initely known. In 1803 John Raraigh, great- 
group, the Thomas Sutton Hall (known as the grandfather of D. Walker Raraigh, moved 
"dining hall"), the Silas M. Clark Hall from Bedford county, Pa., with his wife and 
(known as the boys' dormitory), the residence their children John, Jacob, George, William 



840 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



aud Samuel, Catherine, Polly and Susie. 
They settled at Rossmoyne, Indiana county, 
in the Mahoning district, which at that time 
was a wilderness. In after years they moved 
to Cowanshannoek township, Armstrong Co., 
Pa., near Slate Hill, where they died, and 
they were buried in the German Baptist 
Church cemetery near that place. 

Samuel Raraigh, son of John, was born in 
1801 in Bedford county, Pa., moving with 
his parents to Indiana county in 1803. About 
1830 he made a home for himself in the 
woods, securing 110 acres on the Armstrong 
county line, in South Mahoning township. 
He was fond of the forest and the haunts of 
large game, and was very successful in hunt- 
ing the same, killing a bear when he was but 
twelve years of age. He devoted his life to 
farming, and under his fostering care his 
property was greatly improved, so that when 
he died, in 1877, aged seventy-six years, it was 
very much more valuable than when he se- 
cured it. He married Nancy Hollowell, of 
East Mahoning township, who lived to the 
age of ninety-one years. Samuel Raraigh 
and his wife were members of the German 
Baptist Church of Cowanshannoek township, 
in whose cemetery their remains were buried. 
Their children were: Rachel married John 
Wells, of South Mahoning township, and died 
at the age of fifty-seven; Nancy died at the 
age of eighty-three years; Mary married Wil- 
liam Wells, and died at the age of seventy- 
nine; Samuel married Hannah Mikesell, and 
died in Brushvalley township, aged sixty- 
nine years; Jacob married Barbara Stauffer, 
and died at Smicksburg, aged eighty-one 
years ; Lydia married David Ruffner, of 
South Mahoning township, and died at the 
age of seventy-four; Daniel is mentioned be- 
low ; Sarah Ami died at the age of nineteen ; 
Joseph died at the age of twenty-five; 
Ephraim died in childhood. 

Daniel Raraigh, son of Samuel Raraigh, 
was born June 1, 1836, and was reared on the 
home farm, attending the local school when 
opportunity offered. He cared for his par- 
ents in their declining years, and bought the 
homestead, on which he made many improve- 
ments, including a residence which he built in 
1887, and barns in 1894. He also added to 
the value of the property in other ways and 
was an excellent farmer. Later he bought the 
Tratz farm of seventy-two acres in Cowan- 
shannoek township, Armstrong county, oper- 
ating this in conjunction with his own home- 
stead. He not only farmed upon an extensive 
scale but also carried on stock raising, special- 



izing in the latter line, and continued in active 
business until within a few years of his death, 
when he retired, dying March 22, 1912, on 
the farm on which he was born, in his seventy- 
sixth year. His remains were buried in the 
cemetery of the Baptist Church in South 
Mahoning township. He was a faithful mem- 
ber of that church, which he served as trustee 
for many years. A Republican in politics, 
he served his township ofBcially, and his 
count.y as juror. He was a good citizen, and 
kind and affectionate in his family relations. 

Daniel Raraigh married Sarah F. Byrley, 
wlio was born in Fayette county. Pa., daugh- 
ter of David Bryley, and died Sept. 11, 1902, 
aged sixty- four years; she lies in the Baptist 
Church cemetery in South Mahoning town- 
ship. She joined that church in girlhood and 
was a consistent member of it for half a 
century. Mr. and Mrs. Raraigh had children 
as follows: Joseph died in childhood; Ma- 
lissa married Ross Moore, of Cowanshannoek 
township, Armstrong county; Amanda mar- 
ried E. T. Neigh, and resides in Cowanshan- 
noek township, Armstrong county; David 
Walker is mentioned below; Dillie married 
Clark Davis, of Washington township ; Idella 
married A. H. Bowser, of West Mahoning 
township, and died March 4, 1901, aged 
twenty-eight years. 

David Walker Raraigh was educated in the 
schools of his home neighborhood and in the 
Plumville normal school, then conducted by 
D. H. Tomb. He is an intelligent, well- 
informed man, and his enterprise and busi- 
ness ability, combined with industrious appli- 
cation to his undertakings, have brought him 
prosperity. From childhood he lived with his 
parents, caring for them as they grew old. 
He has always been a farmer, and in addition 
to the homestead in South IMahoning town- 
ship, and the seventy-two acres in Cowan- 
shannoek township, Armstrong county, he 
owns the Byrley farm of sixty-five acres and 
two other tracts in South Mahoning township, 
and a tract of land in Plumville on which he 
has erected several dwelling houses. His 
holdings aggi-egate 300 acres, and he is one 
of the heaviest land owners of his township. 
Mr. Raraigh devotes his land to general farm- 
ing and stock raising, making a specialty of 
raising blooded horses and .other good stock, 
his product being noted the country over. 
Mr. Raraigh takes a deep interest in the up- 
building and development of his locality, and 
is a man of public spirit and integrity. He 
is interested in otlier than agi-ieultural mat- 
ters, having for the last eighteen years been 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNT.Y, PENNSYLVANIA 



841 



agent for fire insurance companies, both home 
and foreign. Among other institutions with 
which he has been connected is the First 
National Bank of Plumville, which he helped 
to organize, and which he has served faith- 
fully as director and vice president for six 
years. He is also a member of and stock- 
holder in the Johnston-Beyer Hardware Com- 
pany of Rural Valley and Wallopburg, and a 
member of the Dayton Agriculture and Me- 
chanical Association. In political sentiment 
he is a sound Republican. He has been a 
member of the election board for several 
years, served his township as auditor for 
fifteen years, and has served on the petit jury 
at Indiana upon more than one occasion. 

On Oct. 21, 1897, Mr. Raraigh was mar- 
ried, at Chambersville, to Annie B. Cummins, 
daughter of John D. and Margaret (Hears) 
Cummins, and a descendant of one of the 
oldest families in Indiana county, a full his- 
tory of whom is given elsewhere in this work. 
She died April 28, 1911, aged thirty-eight 
years, a devoted wife and mother and a 
worthy Christian woman, faithful as a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church. She was laid to 
rest in the little cemetery .connected with 
that church in South Mahoning township, 
where lie the remains of so many of her hus- 
band's family. Mr. and Mrs. Raraigh be- 
came the parents of three children: Dufi! C, 
born July 23, 1899 ; D. Myron, born Aug. 2, 
1900 ; and Davis Walker, born Sept. 4, 1906. 

Mr. Raraigh is a member of the Mahoning 
Baptist Church, which organization he has 
served as trustee and also as deacon. A man 
of high principle, devoted to his home and 
community, he represents the highest type 
of citizen, and is welcomed wherever he goes. 

JOSEPH MOORHEAD, head of the firm 
of Joseph Moorhead & Son, printers and pub- 
lishers of Blairsville, Indiana county, has 
been one of the leaders of public opinion in 
that community for a quarter of a century. 
His long-continued connection with the Blairs- 
ville Enterprise, as editQr and proprietor, has 
kept him in touch with the people and inter- 
ests of this section, and his readiness to de- 
fend the right and defeat the wrong has made 
his influence a factor to be reckoned with. 
So well has he used his power that he has 
thoroughly gained the confidence of his fel- 
low citizens, and he has never abused their 
trust. 

Mr. Moorhead »is a native of Indiana 
county, born Aug. 16, 1829, in Burrell town- 
ship, where the family has been settled since 



1812. In both paternal and maternal lines 
he is of North of Ireland ancestry, and of 
Revolutionary stock through his grandmother, 
Agnes (Craig), whose father lost his life in 
the war for independence. Samuel Moor- 
head, his grandfather, was born in Cumber- 
land county. Pa., in 1769. He became a tan- 
ner, and as there was no tannery in the 
northern part of Westmoreland county when 
he moved there he established a highly pros- 
perous business, which he continued to carry 
on for many years. He became very wealthy 
for his day, acquiring the ownership of eight 
or ten farms. His death occurred in 1853, 
when he was eighty-four years old. 

Hon. Samuel Moorhead, son of Samuel and 
Agnes (Craig) IMoorhead, was the father of 
Joseph Moorhead. He was born in DeiTy 
township, Westmoreland county, married, 
and came in 1812 to Indiana county, where he 
spent practically all the rest of his life en- 
gaged in farming. However, he was a man 
of active disposition and intelligence, and had 
other interests. He built the dam below 
Blairsville on the old Pennsylvania canal. 
He was appointed associate .iudge of the 
courts of Indiana county in 1830, by Gov- 
ernor Wolf, and served as such very credit- 
ably for a period of six years, his keen per- 
ceptions and remarkably good judgment mak- 
ing him a valuable man in that position. In 
politics he was a Democrat, in religion a 
Presbyterian. On March 13, 1812, he married 
Martha Bell, who was born March 24, 1793, 
daughter of John Bell, who removed from 
Cumberland county to Westmoreland county 
in early life. Mrs. Moorhead also belonged 
to the Presbyterian Church. To this union 
were born nine children : Agnes, Elizabeth, 
Samuel, Rebecca, John, Joseph, Myrtilla, 
Wallace and Alexander. The eldest son 
helped to capture the city of Mexico under 
General Scott, and of the five sons four, in- 
cluding him, were in the Union army during 
the Civil war. 

Joseph Moorhead grew to manhood on his 
father's farm, and obtained his education in 
the public schools of his locality. His early 
life was devoted to agricultural work, in 
which he was engaged until he entered the 
Union army, in July, 1863, as a member of 
Company A, 101st P. V. I. He served until 
April, 1865, when he was honorably dis- 
charged at Camp Reynolds, in Allegheny 
county, and returning home he resumed 
charge of his farm in Burrell township. 
Farming continued to be his chief interest 
unti] 1886, in which year he removed to the 



842 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



borough of Blairsville, and took charge of 
the Enterprise as editor and proprietor. 
The paper had been established in 1880, and 
was an eight-column quarto, which under Mr. 
Moorhead's direction soon acquired a high 
reputation as a weU-conducted sheet. Its 
news columns are devoted chiefly to local 
affairs, important county and borough hap- 
penings, church and social items, and well- 
selected general reading matter. 'Sir. Moor- 
head has pursued a clean, independent policy 
which has won him the respect and admira- 
tion of all his fellow citizens in Blairsville, 
and which has directly and indirectly helped 
to raise moral standards in this locality very 
materially. Though able and willing, when 
necessary, to state his own position or objec- 
tion to other tactics with vigor and force, he 
has never resorted to vituperation or un- 
worthy methods to accomplish any good end 
toward which he may be working, and the 
skill he has shown in quiet but persistent 
opposition to wrong-doing has met with much 
success and made him many friends among 
the best element. Politically he is a Repub- 
lican, and on July 24, 1890. under the Har- 
rison administration, was appointed post- 
master at Blairsville for a term of four years. 
Socially he belongs to Findley Patch Post, 
No. 137, G. A. R., and he is a member of the 
Presbyterian Church, which he has served 
as elder for fifty-two years. 

In 1852 IMr. Moorhead married Rebecca 
Armel, who was bom June 2, 1834, in West- 
moreland county, daughter of Isaac and Mar- 
garet (Sease) Armel, of Burrell township. 
She died in April, 1870, leaving three chil- 
dren : Richard E., George R. and Jessie Mil- 
dred. In 1871 Mr. Moorhead married (sec- 
ond) Rebecca Hosack. who was born in West- 
moreland county in 1843, daughter of Mr. 
and Jlrs. Alexander Hosack, of Westmore- 
land. Thev have had six children, namelv : 
John W., RIyrtilla B., Alice C, Mary, Harry 
S. and Joseph P. 

WILLIAM PENN OBERLIN, deceased, 
who for upward of twenty years was a well- 
known business man of Rochester Mills, Pa., 
was born Nov. 14, 1836, in the city of Pitts- 
burg, Pa., son of Christopher and Cathai-ine 
(Kubach) Oberlin. 

Christopher Oberlin, the father of William 
Penn Oberlin. was born near the Rhine, in 
leaden, Germany, in 1701. and there grew 
to manhood and learned the trade of weavei'. 
He was married in the Fatherland to Cath- 
arine Kubach, and with Ihcir threi' children 



they left their native country as early as 1833 
and crossed the Atlantic in a sailing vessel. 
On arriving in this country they came to 
Lancaster, Pa., where they remained a short 
time, ^Ir. Oberlin following the trade of stock- 
ing weaving, and then crossed the Allegheny 
mountains and located in the city of Pitts- 
burg, where the father continued the same 
business and also opened a store for the sale 
of his product. The familj' home was located 
on Penn street, and there the mother died in 
1840. at the age of thirtj'-eight j-ears, her 
death being caused by homesickness, as she 
had always longed to return to her native 
country. She was the mother of four children, 
namely : Lewis F., deceased, who was an Ohio 
river captain and married Christina Shelby; 
Charles, born in 1824, a shoemaker of West 
Mahoning township, who married in 1846 
Catharine Grossman, and died at the home of 
his son in Puuxsutawney ; Samuel, who died 
while the family was coming to this country 
and was buried at sea; and William Penn. 
Christopher Oberlin was married ■ (second) 
at Lancaster, Pa., to Mary Eschelman, and 
they became the parents of two children : Su- 
sannah C, who married Henry Beecher, both 
dying at Belle Center, Ohio ; and Nancy, ^ 
who married T. S. Neal, ex-sherift' of Indiana 
county, and a resident of North Mahoning 
township. Christopher Oberlin died in 1859, 
at the age of sixty-eight years, and was buried 
in the Allegheny cemetery. He was a member 
of the German Evangelical Church. 

William Penn Oberlin. son of Christopher 
Oberlin, was educated in the public schools of 
Pittsburg, and was still a small lad when he 
lost his mother. He learned the trade of shoe- 
maker with his brother Charles, at Smicks- 
burg, where he worked at same and subse- 
ciuently opened a shop of his own, being thus 
engaged at the time of the outbreak of the 
Civil war. On Aug. 27, 1862. he enlisted in 
Company E, 148th Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infautiy, Capt. John Sutton, Col. James A. 
Beaver, of Center county, and this company 
was mustered into the service Sept. 2. 1862. 
^Ir. Oberlin continuing to serve until the close 
of the war. Among the numei-ous engage- 
ments in which he participated may be men- 
tioned the following: Chancellorsville, ^lay 
3, 1863; Haymarket, July 25. 1863; Gettys- 
burg, July 2 and 3, 1863. where he contracted 
bowel trouble from the impure drinking 
water, and was confined to the hospital for 
several months. He rejoined his regiment 
in lime to participate in the battle of tlie 
Wilderness. May 4-7, 1S64: Spottsylvania. 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



843 



May 9-14, 1864; Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864; 
Petersburg, June 15-30, 1864; Deep Bottom, 
July 27, 1864; Ream's Station, Aug. 24, 1864; 
second Deep Bottom, Aug. 14-20, 1864 ; charge 
on works at Petereburg, Oct. 27, 1864 ; Hatch- 
er 's Run; Adams Rim; Sutherland Station, 
and numerous minor engagements. He was 
at the evacuation of Richmond, and fell into 
the hands of the Confederates and was taken 
to Libby, but was subsequently released and 
rejoined his regiment. At the battle of Get- 
tysburg he received a slight wound in the 
knee. 

On receiving his honorable discharge, after 
a service that was characterized by bravery 
and devotion to duty, Mr. Oberlin resumed 
his trade, locating in the western part of West 
Mahoning township, near the Armstrong 
county line. There he settled on a farm that 
is now the property of John ShafEer, and con- 
tinued his trade and farmed until 1873, when 
he was aiipointed manager of the shoe de- 
partment of the Dayton Soldiers' Orphans' 
Home, a position which he held for three 
years. He then spent one year as male at- 
tendant in the same institution. His brother 
Charles later held the position of superin- 
tendent of the shoe department there. In 
1877 Mr. Oberlin resigned his position and lo- 
cated in Smicksburg, where he took up the 
manufacture of shoes, with several men in 
his employ. In 1879 he came to Richmond 
(Rochester Mills) and here embarked in a 
mercantile business with James Adams, in 
the center of the town, under the firm style 
of Adams & Oberlin, this partnership contin- 
uing until 1885, when Mr. Oberlin moved to 
the eastern part of the valley, or near the 
banks of the Little Mahoning. There he 
erected a store, 26 by 65 feet, two stories in 
height, where he entered business with his 
sous as partners, under the firm name of W. 
P. Oberlin & Sons, and continued active in 
same up to the time of his death, which oc- 
curred suddenly, Aug. 21, 1897, from the ef- 
fects of disease he had contracted iu the array. 
He was buried in Pine Grove cemetery. Mr. 
Obei-lin was a member of Frank W. Brown 
Post, No. 266, Grand Army of the Republic, 
at Richmond. In political matters he was a 
Republican, and his religious belief was that 
of the United Brethren Church, in which he 
was class leader and Sunday school teacher 
and superintendent. A well-read man, he 
was domestic in his tastes and devoted to his 
family, and among his business associates had 
■a reputation for the strictest integrity. 

Mr. Oberlin was married iu "West Mahoning 



township, March 14, 1860, to Anna M. 
Stauffer, who was born in that township, 
daughter of Jonathan and Susanna (Beyer) 
Stauifer. Mrs. Oberlin 's family came from 
Huntingdon county, and were early settlers 
of Indiana county. She is still living, active 
and in full possession of her faculties, and 
makes her home in Richmond. Four children 
were born to IMr. and Mrs. Oberlin, namely: 
Ella M., Ida C, Harry Walter and Curtis A. 

Ella M. Oberlin, daughter of William 
Penn Oberlin, was bom Feb. 22, 1861, and is 
the widow of James H. Elkin. She resides 
in Indiana, Pa., and is the mother of Linus 
J. and Curtis Elkin, both graduates of the 
State normal school, Indiana. 

Ida C. Oberlin, daughter of William 
Penn Oberlin, was born Sept. 3, 1862, and 
married Linus M. Lewis, of Canoe township, 
Indiana county, a farmer. They have two 
children, Ruelba M. and William Edward. 

Harry Walter Oberlin, son of William 
Penn Oberlin, was born in West IMahon- 
ing township, Indiana county. Pa., June 
22, 1865, and received his education in the 
public schools of Dayton, Smicksburg and 
Grant township, and at Dayton academy, un- 
der Hugh McCandless. He taught school for 
one term in Grant township, but when his 
father embarked in business on his own ac- 
count he and his brother Curtis A. became 
clerks, and in 1890 were admitted to partner- 
ship, under the firm style of W. P. Oberlin 
& Sons. When their father died the brothers 
formed a partnership under the style of 
Oberlin Brothers, an association which has 
continued to the present time. In 1907 they 
erected one of the finest stores in Indiana 
county north of Indiana, a three-story struc- 
ture, 30x90 feet, where they are conducting 
a very successful business. Both are thorough 
business men, of pleasing personality, good 
judgment and inherent business acumen, and 
have inherited their father's love for integ- 
rity and honest dealing. Harry W. Oberlin 
is a Republican, although he has never been 
an office seeker, and his religious belief is that 
of the United Brethren Church, in which he 
has served as class leader, trustee and in other 
capacities. Besides his mercantile business, 
he and his wife are largely interested in real 
estate, coal lands and timber tracts, in East 
Mahoning, Grant and White townships, and 
Mr. Oberlin is a stockholder in the Indiana 
Savings and Trust Company. 

In August, 1896, Mr. Oberlin was married 
to Luella M. Leasure. who was born July 3, 
1868, daughter of Daniel Leasure. Mrs. 



844 



PIISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Obeiiin is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church, and is widely known in religious 
work and social circles. Six children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Oberlin, namely: 
Evelyn, a student in the State normal school, 
Indiana ; David William and Martha, who re- 
side at home with their parents ; Louise, who 
met her death by drowning when three and 
a half j'ears old; Ruth, who died when she 
was two years old; and Mildred, who died in 
infancy. Mr. Oberlin is a charter member of 
Robert Doty Camp, Sons of Veterans, at Rich- 
mond. 

Curtis A. . Oberlin, son of William Penn 
Oberlin, was born in West Mahoning town- 
ship, Indiana county, Pa., May 30, 1867. 
He received his educational training in the 
public schools of Dayton, Pa., and West Ma- 
honing and Grant townships, and worked at 
home until entering his father's store as a 
clerk, in 1890. There he received the train- 
ing that has made him so successful as a busi- 
ness man, and like his brother he is thorough- 
ly conversant with every detail of their en- 
terprise. Like him, also, he has gained the 
respect and esteem of the people of his com- 
munity, and the confidence of the customers 
of the establishment, through his thoroughly 
business-like dealings and the honorable man- 
ner in which he lives up to the letter of his 
contracts. He has also invested his money in 
various other enterprises, and is the owner of 
timber tracts, coal land and other real estate, 
a stockholder in the Marion Center National 
Bank, and the owner of the well-known Wid- 
dowson hotel property in Richmond. Essen- 
tially a business man, he has devoted his en- 
tire attention to his private affairs and has 
not cared to enter the public arena as a seeker 
for preferment, although he supports the 
principles and candidates of the Republican 
party. His religious faith is that of the Gold- 
en Rule, and his social connection with Robert 
Doty Camp, Sons of Veterans, of which he 
is a charter member. 

In 1907 Mr. Oberlin was married to JIaria 
R. Moore, who was bom in East Mahoning 
township, daughter of William Moore. They 
have one child, Ralph C. 

ROWLAND. The Rowland family of 
southern Indiana county is well represented 
there at the present time, and its members 
have not only been substantial citizens who 
contributed to the material prosperity of the 
section but zealous church workers, associated 
with the Baptist denomination. Some of its 
members have entered the ministry of that 



church. Rev. Elias Rowland, a retired minis- 
ter, now residing at Mechanicsburg, and Rev. 
Martin Luther Rowland, also retired and liv- 
ing in South Mahoning township, having done 
notable work in their day. 

The family is of Welsh origin. William 
Rowland, the fii-st of the line in America, was 
a native of Wales, came to this country with 
his wife Elizabeth Ellis, and settled' near 
Ebensburg, Pa. His son, Griffith Rowland, 
bom in Wales about 1771, married Jane Jones, 
daughter of William Jones, and both the Jones 
and Rowland families came to America about 
1795, settling first near Ebensburg, Pa. The 
Rowlands continued to make their home in 
Cambria county, locating about 1800 in Cone- 
maugh township, where Mr. Rowland became 
a land owner and followed farming. Settling 
in the wilderness, he hewed out a home for 
himself and there spent the remainder of his 
life, dying in 1847, aged seventy-six years; 
he is buried in Bethel Church cemetery, near 
Ebensburg. His wife also died on the farm, 
and is buried in the same cemetery. Their 
children were : William ; ilaria, who married 
John Crumb and (second) Joseph Craig; 
Isaac, who married Elizabeth Keller; Jacob; 
Griffith J., who married Mary Mikesell and 
(second) Margaret Jordan, and died in 1871; 
John, who man-ied Jane Conrad, and lived 
in Brushvalley township ; and Eliza, who mar- 
ried Enoch Reese. 

William Rowland, son of Griffith, was born 
Oct. 3, 1801, in what was then Conemaugh 
(later Blacklick) township, Cambria county, 
where he grew to manhood and became en- 
gaged in fanning, at first on the homestead. 
Settling on a farm in Blacklick township, 
Cambria county, among the first settlers of 
that section, he remained there about six 
years, following farming, and made extensive 
improvements on his place. Later, in 1838, 
he removed to South Mahoning township, In- 
diana county, buying a tract of 112 acres 
from Mr. Stannard which was all woods at 
the time. He built a log house, hewing the 
logs himself, put up a stable and set to work 
to clear his property, making extensive im- 
provements on the farm, where he spent the 
rest of his days, dying there Aug. 8, 1883. 
On April 12, 1832, he married Clarissa Run- 
del, who was born May 26, 1809, daughter of 
Gilbert and Amy (Nichols) Ruudel, of Gen- 
esee county, N. Y., and died on the farm Aug. 
5, 1897, aged eighty-eight years, two months, 
ten days. Her son AVilliam S. Rowland cared 
for her in her^declining years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Rowland were membei-s of the Baptist Church, 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



845 



and wei-e buried in the Baptist Church ceme- 
tery in Mahoning township. In politics he 
was a Whig and Republican. Thirteen chil- 
dren were born to this pioneer couple : Elias, 
born Feb. 16, 1833, is mentioned below; Wil- 
liam S., born July 25, 1834, is mentioned be- 
low; John G., born Jan. 16, 1836, married 
Tabitha Milliron; Isaac, born Aug. 28, 1837, 
married Susan Neville and (second) Mary 
French, and he died in the State of Washing- 
ton; Jacob, born March 28, 1839, married 
Romina Curry and settled in Jefferson City, 
Mo., where he died; Emma Jane, born July 
17, 1841, died young; Annie Maria (de- 
ceased), born Jan. 30, 1843, married Isaac 
Wisinger, of Cambria county. Pa. ; Elizabeth, 
born Dee. 5, 1844, married Thomas Mitchell; 
Mary E., born July 12, 1846, is the widow of 
John Davis, who was a farmer and merchant 
of Nanty Glo, Pa. ; Mahala, born March 23, 
1849, died in infancy; Rev. Martin Luther, 
born Jan. 16, 1848, is mentioned below; 
Amanda, born Nov. 4, 1851, married Thomas 
Jones, and resides at Seattle, Wash. ; Sarah 
Rebecca, born June 3, 1854, married Coleman 
Miller, and resides at Toledo, Ohio. The eld- 
est five sons of this family, Elias, William S., 
John G., Isaac and Jacob, were soldiers in 
the Civil war, and John G. died of starvation 
in Salisbury prison, where he was confined 
for six months. 

Rev. Elias Rowland, the grand old man 
of Mechanicsburg, a retired minister of 
the Baptist Church, though in his eighty-first 
year is still active in mind and body, and after 
years of fruitful labor in the Lord's vineyard 
can look back in his declining years with pleas- 
ure and pride to the good work that he has 
accomplished. His life has not been lived in 
vain. 

Mr. Rowland was born in Blacklick town- 
ship, Cambria county, spent his boyhood days 
on the farm and attended the local school, but 
most of his education he gained by reading 
and observation, becoming a well-read man. 
He continued on the farm until 1852, when 
he found employment in the Cambria Iron 
Works, at Johnstown, working there some 
time. Then he turned his attention to farm- 
ing, which he followed for eight years. Wish- 
ing to follow a professional life he took up 
the study of medicine with Dr. J. R. Morris 
and was preparing to attend medical lectures 
when he enlisted, June 13, 1863, in Company 
A, Battalion of Emergency Men, serving un- 
til Lee was driven across the Potomac. He 
was discharged Aug. 8, 1863. On March 31, 
1864, he again enlisted, becoming a member 



of Company K, 187th Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, which was attached to the 5th Army 
Corps, and took part in the battles of Cold 
Harbor, Petersburg, second engagement on 
the Weldon railroad, and Fort White. He 
was discharged at Harrisburg Aug. 3, 1865. 
Returning home he again took up farming, 
in Cambria county, where he also served as 
justice of the peace for nearly thirty years. 
Meantime he turned his attention to the study 
of theology, and in 1892 he was licensed to 
preach. In 1896 he was ordained a minister 
of the gospel, and began to preach at Bethel 
Baptist Church, in Cambria county, where 
he continued until the early part of the pres- 
ent centurj^ at that time coming to Mechanics- 
burg. There he has made his home ever since, 
and he preached here for several years. He is 
now retired, but still active mentally and 
physically, and preaches occasionally. While 
justice of the peace he had the remarkable 
record of having all his judgments sustained 
by the courts. At Mechanicsburg he has 
served as member of the borough council, 
and for the last four years he has served as 
burgess of the borough. He is a man of genial 
personality, and strong character. Mr. Row- 
land is a firm believer in temperance. 

On Nov. 28, 1854, Mr. Rowland married 
Isabelle Wilson Simson, daughter of Levi 
Simson, and she died June 23, 1911, after a 
married life of nearly fifty-seven years. She 
was a good Christian woman, a devoted wife 
and mother, a loving helpmate, and a sweet 
influence for good in her home and in the 
community. She was her husband's sympa- 
thetic associate in his Christian work, and 
much of his pleasure in its performance was 
due to her kindly co-operation. She is buried 
at Bethel, Cambria county, Pa. Children as 
follows were born to Mr. and Mrs. Rowland: 
John Luther, born Jan. 29, 1856, died Oct. 
14, 1869. James E., born June 9, 1858, died 
Dec. 28, 1903, married Alice Keller and left 
a family of one son and five daughters, all 
living. Isaac E., born June 14, 1861, died 
Sept. 14, 1865. Alvah H., born April 30, 
1866, died Aug. 27, 1907, married Rosy J. 
Michaels and left a family of two sons and 
three daughters, three of whom are deceased. 
Austin E., born May 21, 1869, died April 5, 
1874. Harvey Chalmers, born July 23, 1873, 
was educated in the Cambria county public 
schools and taught school for some time. He is 
now engaged in the jewelry business, and also 
as an electric mechanic. A young man of in- 
ventive mind and a genius in his line, he is 
making a success of his work and is a much 



846 



HISTOKY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



respected citizen. He lived at liome until his 
marriage, June 26, 1913, to Alice C. ShafiCer, 
daughter of the late John Shaffer, of Brush- 
valley, Pa., the marriage ceremony being per- 
foi-med by the Rev. Elias Rowland, assisted 
by Rev. P. 0. Wagner. 

Rev. Mr. Rowland is a Republican, and for 
some twenty-five years or more served on the 
board of school directors, much of the time 
acting as secretary of that body. He has 
taken an active interest in all matters of a 
literary or educational nature. Socially he 
is a member of the G. A. R. 

William S. Rowland, a well-known and 
successful farmer, of South Mahoning town- 
ship, Indiana county, was born July 25, 1834, 
in what is now Blacklick (then Cambria) 
township, Cambria county, and was quite 
young when the family moved to Indiana 
county. When he was about seven years old 
he went to live with his uncle and aunt, IMr. 
and Mrs. Enoch Reese, in Blacklick township, 
Cambria county, where he continued to make 
his home for five years, attending school there. 
Returning to the parental home he remained 
but a short time, going from there to Brush- 
valley township, Inditoa county, to live with 
his uncle John Rowland, near Meehanicsburg, 
spending a period of eight years there. Dur- 
ing that time he also had opportunity to at- 
tend school. After his return home he became 
a student at the Dayton academy, aud then 
taught school for one term in West ^Mahoning 
township, Indiana county. He went back 
home again, and was engaged in farming un- 
til 1864, when he enlisted in Company B. Tth 
Pennsylvania Cavalry, in which command his 
brother Jacob was also a private ; it was un- 
der command of Colonel McCormack and was 
attached to the Army of the Cumberland. 
Mr. Rowland served until the close of the 
war, being discharged at Nashville in 1865, 
and coming home he settled down to farming 
on the homestead, buying the property from 
his parents, for whom he cared during their 
remaining days. He made extensive improve- 
ments on the' fann, putting up a new house, 
barn and other buildings, and continued to 
reside there foi- the next forty years, follow- 
ing farming and stock raising. In 1904 he 
sold the farm and bought the smaller tract 
on the Smicksburg and Plumville road which 
he now occupies, this being fifty-two acres 
formerly known as the Bracken farm. He 
has remodeled tlie house and made other im- 
provements, the appearance of his home and 
surroundings denoting the thrift character- 
istic of the owner. Though he has never 



sought ofBce, preferring to devote his time to 
his own affairs, ^Ir. Rowland has served as 
supervisor of his township, and he was also 
school director for one term, when the first 
Davis school was built. In politics he was 
formerly a Republican but now associated 
with the Prohibition party, being a strong ad- 
vocate of temperance and a stanch supporter 
of the cause. For some years Mr. Rowland 
was an active member of the G. A. R. Post at 
Plumville. 

In 1861 Mr. Rowland was married to Mary 
Jane Lukehart, who was born in 1837, in In- 
diana county. Pa., daughter of Jacob and 
Lena (Davis) Lukehart, and died Oct. 25, 
1884, the mother of seven children, namely: 
Emer}'* Prescott, who makes his home uear 
Jeft'erson City, Mo. ; John Davis, a meat deal- 
er of ilarion Center. Pa. ; Elvena Bertha, 
wife of Jesse E. McDevitt and residing in 
Punxsutawney, Pa. ; Ira Curtin, a carpenter 
and builder, of Pittsburg; Homer, who died 
young; Allura Estelle, who died young; and 
Clara, who married John Lydick and died in 
North Mahoning township, Indiana couutv, in 
1912. In 1888 Mr. Rowland married (second) 
Lydia Agnes Lukehart, sister of his first wife, 
and to this union have been born three chil- 
dren: Mayme Tessie, who married George 
Nolf and resides in Apollo, Pa. ; Olive Leuora, 
who is a dressmaker at home ; and William 
Clair, at home. Mr. and ^Mrs. Rowland are 
valued members of the ^Mahoning Baptist 
Church, which he has served as deacon, and 
he has also been a faithful Sunday school 
worker, serving as teacher and superin- 
tendent. 

Rev. Martin Luther Rowland, youngest 
son of William Rowland, was born Jan. 16, 
1848, in South JMahoning township, Indiana 
county, on the old homestead now owned by 
McKee Wilson, and attended the local schools. 
Remaining at home until he was fourteen 
years old, he then went to Punxsutawney, 
Jeft'erson county, where he worked a short 
time for a Dr. Wood, after which he went to 
Blacklick township. Cambria county, and en- 
gaged in shookmaking for four years. While 
there he became converted, under the preach- 
ing of Rev. J. W. Evans, a Baptist minister 
who preached at Bethel Church, and was bap- 
tized by him when eighteen years old. Mean- 
time returning home he remained on the home- 
stead with his father while his five brothers 
were serving their country in the Civil war. 
Wishing to become a minister of the gospel, 
lie attended Reed's Institute at Reedsburg, 
Clarion county. Pa., taking a preparatory 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



847 



course, of three years, and was licensed' to 
preach in 1870, delivering his first sermon in 
the Williamsburg schoolhouse, two miles from 
the institute. He was ordained Oct. 14, 1874, 
at the old Pine Creek Church, in the Clarion 
Association, by Rev. Aaron Neff, moderator, 
and Rev. W. S. Bowser, clerk of the council, 
with laying- on of hands by seven other min- 
isters. For the next five years he was pastor 
of the Pine Creek Church, where he built 
the present house of worship, during that 
time also preaching two years at the Frank- 
lin Union Church and two years at the Red 
Bank Church, of the Clarion Association. For 
one year following he was preacher at the 
West Lebanon Baptist Church, and from 
there went to the Fairview Church and the 
Shiloh Church, in the Indiana Association, 
preaching at the former for six years and at 
the latter four years. From there he trans- 
ferred to the Twolick Church, where he re- 
mained five years, at the end of that period 
going to the Baptist Church at Spencerville, 
Allen county, Ohio, in the Auglaize Associa- 
tion, serving that one year and the Mount 
Zion Church for six months. He next preached 
six months at Ada, Ohio, returning to Penn- 
sylvania at the end of that time because of 
the ill health of his wife and child, taking 
the pastorate of the Old Union Baptist 
Church, south of Kittanning, Armstrong 
county, for one year. That was in the Clar- 
ion Association. From there he went to 
Leechburg, same county, for two years, thence 
back to the Twolick Church (where he had 
formerly served five years) for seven years, 
during the latter part of that period also 
serving as pastor of the Baptist Churches at 
Blairsville and East Mahoning — two years at 
each place. Then he resigned to become pas- 
tor of the Sugar Creek Church in the Monon- 
gahela Association, being there one j'ear and 
subsequently at ilonongahela Union four 
years. While there he organized the Baptist 
Church at Mount Morris and was pastor 
of the Zora Church one year in Monon- 
galia county, W. Va., and also built an out 
station. Resigning from that charge he re- 
turned to the bounds of the Indiana Associa- 
tion, where he lived five years. Then he be- 
came pastor of the Mount Zion Church in 
Butler, Pa., for three years, having an as- 
sistant there. Returning to Indiana county, 
he has since made his home on a small farm 
in South Mahoning township, east of Plum- 
ville. Since settling here he has served the 
Twolick Church for about four j^ears, and 
has also supplied at the West Mahoning and 



Crooked Creek Churches, and Ambrose Bap- 
tist Church. Mr. Rowland has been preaching 
for about forty years altogether, and has done 
notable work in this section for his denomina- 
tion. He is a stanch advocate of temperance, 
and has taught its principles wherever and 
whenever possible. In political sentiment he 
is a Republican. 

OnMay 6, 1874, Mr. Rowland was married 
to Nannie A. Hull, daughter of James and 
Nancy (Bell) Hull, and they have had four 
children: Emma Bell, born May 4, 1875, 
died young; Clara Ross, born April 30, 1877, 
died when five months old; Wilda D., born 
Aug. 20, 1879, graduated from the State nor- 
mal school in 1896, and taught nine terms of 
school, four in the borough of Kittanning, 
Pa., and married H. H. Claypole Aug. 7, 
1912; William James Mentor, born July 14, 
1881, is at home. 

GEORGE K. KLINE, who has one of the 
principal dry goods establishments in Johns- 
town, Pa., is a native son of Indiana county, 
born Oct. 13, 1863, in the borough of Indiana. 
He is a son of Wellington B. and Annie M. 
(Custer) Kline, and a grandson of George 
Kline, and his earlier ancestors, who were of 
German and French origin, were among the 
early settlers of Eastern Pennsylvania. 

George Kline, the grandfather, was born in 
Berks county, Pa., March 12, 1807, and died 
Feb. 5, 1876, at the age of sixty-eight years, 
in Indiana county. Pa. He was a merchant 
and hotelkeeper by occupation. 

Wellington B. Kline, son of George, was 
born in Berks county, Feb. 4, 1840, and from 
1863 lived at Indiana, Pa., where he was one 
of the founders of the mercantile house of 
Marshall & Kline, in their day one of the 
largest dry goods concerns in that part of 
the State. The partnership continued until 
Mr. Marshall's death, in 1894, after which 
Mr. Kline moved to Johnstown and formed an 
association with his son George, under the 
name of W. B. Kline & Son. He was one of 
the substantial business men of that place 
until his death, March 15, 1904. 

George K. Kline obtained all his education 
in Indiana, attending the public schools until 
his graduation in 1875 ; he then took a course 
in the State normal school. In 1878 he be- 
gan to clerk regularly for his father, remain- 
ing with the firm of Marshall & Kline until 
1891, when he located at Johnstown. In 1894, 
when the firm of W. B. Kline & Son was 
organized, he became junior member, and since 
his father's death has carried on the 



848 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



alone as George K. Kline. His stock and ac- 
commodations have been increased steadily to 
meet the wants of the constantly enlarging 
trade, and the store is up-to-date in every 
particular, ranking among the best in that 
section of Pennsylvania. His line of goods is 
varied and complete. Mr. Kline has been 
notably successful in the line of business with 
which his family has been associated for sev- 
eral generations, and it is only just to say 
that his large trade has been built up by the 
most honorable methods, coupled with the fac- 
ulty of providing excellent service for all who 
patronize his store. 

Fraternally Mr. Kline has various connec- 
tions and is well known. He is a Mason, be- 
longing to Indiana Lodge, No. 313, P. & A. 
M.; Zerubbabel Chapter, No. 162, R. A. M., 
of Pittsburg; Commandery No. 1, K. T., of 
Pittsburg; Syria Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., 
of Pittsburg. He is also a member of the 
Johnstown Royal Arcanum and Johnstown 
Lodge of Elks, No. 175. His religious con- 
nection is with the Presbyterian Church. 

On Aug. 5, 1891, Mr. Kline married Sarah 
Morley, daughter of James and Ann ilorley, 
of Johnstown. They have one son, James 
Morley, born May 3, 1892. 

JOHN BUCHANAN McCORMICK was 
born Nov. 4, 1834, in the little village of Sink- 
ing Valley, near Tyrone, Huntingdon (now 
Blair) Co., Pa., of Scotch-Irish parentage, 
descending from the McCormicks and Con- 
leys on the paternal side, and the Buchanans 
and Bards in the maternal line. They set- 
tled in Colonial times in Pranklin and Cum- 
berland counties. Pa., and at Bardstown, Ken- 
tucky. 

In March, 1838, Joseph A. McCoi-mick, 
father of John B. McCormick, moved with his 
family from Sinking Valley to Smicksburg, 
Indiana Co., Pa., on sleds, the growth of tim- 
ber being so heavy at that time that the 
snow remained until late in the season of 
springtime. The lad was now about three 
years and four months old. At the age of 
six, ba'-efooted and bareheaded, he followed 
after the hounds. Ranger and General Jack- 
son, from the hills across the creek to the 
loop hills and back where the deer would 
generally take to the water above the village. 
A tow shirt and tow trousers to cover his 
nakedness and keep out the sun, with a straw 
hat (which was soon torn up in the brush), 
made up his summer costume. In the winter- 
time later he carried a cowbell while trailing 
the deer through the snow for his highly es- 



teemed friend. Dr. William N. Sims, to head 
at well-known crossings. The advantages for 
education at that time were meager enough. 
His first teacher was a Mrs. McCumber, wife 
of a Baptist minister. The iMcCumbers came 
from the State of Connecticut. The largest 
room in their house was the schoolroom, and 
the seats were two pine slabs, brought from 
Travis's sawmill, with. four legs to each, and 
placed around the wall. Mrs. McCumber 
was an accomplished artist in water colors, 
and her pupils received cards, decorated with 
flowers, or foxes, dogs, cats, deer, coons and 
other animals as rewards of merit, hand- 
painted and beautiful, and much appreciated 
by her handful of "scholars." This no doubt 
accounts, in part at least, for Mr. McCor- 
mick 's artistic tastes. He picked up most 
of his knowledge piecemeal, while all through 
his life experience has been his best teacher 
About this time his Grandmother Buchanan 
who was the daughter of Rev. David Bard 
visited them, and being an artist in mezzo 
tints and other lines she taught him to out- 
line horses, cattle, houses and various other 
objects with grains of corn on the bottom of 
wooden seated chairs or table. Those were 
the little things that started the restless young 
mind to work out other matters later. He 
went into the shop to assist his father at the 
age of eight. At that time all the material for 
the making and repairing of tarpole wagons 
was taken from the woods. "White oak was 
used for the tongues, and a tree that would 
split out eight pieces was selected, and placed 
heart up to season. For axles hickory was 
used, split and seasoned. February was the 
month for cutting. Mr. McCormick said: 
"My father and I used to cut this timber when 
I was only able to steady the crosscut saw, 
and our dinner would be cold boiled pork 
and corn pone and sometimes bread, which 
people now would consider entirely too plain. " 
At the age of ten he was a fair workman, 
and turned the material on a tramp lathe and 
framed and painted a little rockingchair for 
his baby sister. At the same time he turned 
clothespins from dry wild cherry to place in 
the bedrooms of the double porch house in 
Smicksburg built in 1844, by Hezekiah Christ- 
man. When seventeen years of age he was 
allowed to start in with his uncle, David B. 
Buchanan, in an old-fashioned cabinet and 
chair shop, where all the work was done by 
hand, and he thoroughly mastered the trade 
in all its details, from the woods to the fin- 
ishing. At the same time he cultivated a taste 
for music, and the first violin he played upon 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



849 



was made by himself. His musical talents 
he turned to advantage. For about five 
months in the year, for about twenty-two 
years, he taught old-fashioned singing school 
in schoolhouses and churches in Indiana and 
adjoining counties, where the name of Mc- 
Cormick became as familiar as household 
words. Trudging from place to place (and 
he did not wear an overcoat), he estimates 
that in looking after his schools alone he 
walked 42,000 miles in the twenty-two years. 
It was in this manner, and in house painting 
and graining, he made the money which after- 
ward enabled him to develop and bring forth 
his turbine wheels. 

In 1873 Mr. McCormick went to Brookville, 
Pa., to Brown, Son & Co., where the shops and 
patterns were bui-ned twice. After the test- 
ing of the "Hercules" turbine at Holj'oke, 
McCormick and Brown made an agreement 
with the Stilwell & Bieree Company, of Day- 
ton, Ohio, which proved very disastrous for 
them. Mr. McCormick went into their em- 
ploy to perfect patterns. After six months 
they had received all of the information they 
desired, and unknown to him took out patents 
on the so-called "Victor Turbine," which em- 
bodied everything in the "Hercules." Mr. 
McCormick went to Holyoke in 1877, and en- 
gaged with the Holyoke Machine Company to 
manufacture the ' ' Hercules, ' ' remaining with 
them for about eleven years, putting eighteen 
sizes, right and left hand, above eighty per 
cent useful, an efficiency percentage which Mr. 
Emerson highly commended. After perfect- 
ing the "Hercules" there was a misunder- 
standing between Mr. McCoi-mick and the 
company, and he had to sue them to obtain 
his rights. Hon. George D. Robinson, es- 
governor of Massachusetts, was his attorney 
and won his suit against the company. 

Mr. McCormick then brought out a turbine 
about twenty-five per cent stronger as to di- 
ameter than the "Hercules," entitled " Mc- 
Cormick 's Holyoke Turbine," which was per- 
fected in all sizes at the shops of J. & "W. 
Jolly, Holyoke, Mass. It was also made by the 
S. Morgan Smith Company, York, Pa., and 
the Dubuque Turbine & Roller Mill Com- 
pany, Dubuque, Iowa. James Emerson, the 
great tester of wheels, said: "IMr. McCor- 
mick as a designer and perfecter of hydraulic 
motors stands upon the top rung of the lad- 
der, has stood there for twenty years without 
a parallel, not in the United States alone, but 
upon this planet. ' ' 

Mr. McCormick has published two musical 
works, viz.: "School & Concert," 310 pages. 



and "The Village Choir," 336 pages, said to 
be the greatest collections in their class in the 
English language. Mr. McCormick is unas- 
suming about what he has, or has accom- 
plished, but he prizes a few old paintings 
which he executed many years ago, in particu- 
lar a night view of "Donati's Comet" as it ap- 
peared at Smicksburg in 1858, when it was at 
its brightest (size 30 by 28 inches) ; "The 
Country Boj' on Sunday Morning" (size 10 
by 12 inches) and the beautiful hills which 
surround the farm where he makes his home. 
It seems to be his artistic delight to show and 
describe the view to strangers. 

Now, in his seventy-ninth year, Mr. Mc- 
Cormick is working at all kinds of farm labor 
as though he were compelled to do so to keep 
the wolf from the door. His greatest delight 
seems to be the improvement of his land and 
bringing his farms to the highest state of 
cultivation, and to find out for a certainty 
what can be produced per acre on Indiana 
county soil. 

THOMAS SHARP NEAL, formerly sheriff 
of Indiana county, has also served in various 
minor offices, and has long been a popular and 
respected citizen of his section. He makes 
his home at Trade City, where he was in the 
mercantile business for a number of years. 
He has been associated with the typical in- 
dustries of the region throughout his active 
career, and has acquired considerable land. 
Mr. Neal was born Sept. 2, 1841, on the old 
Neal homestead in North Mahoning township, 
son of John and Rachel (Blose) Neal and 
grandson of William Neal. His great-grand- 
father, William Neal, the first of this branch 
of the family to settle in America, was from 
the north of Ireland. His wife was Mary 
Reynolds. They first located at Philadelphia, 
later in Franklin county. Pa., and eventually 
came to Indiana county, in the seventeen hun- 
dreds, where he obtained nearly three thou- 
sand acres of land west of Indiana, near 
Jacksonville. He was a surveyor, and became 
very well known. His death occurred in 1813, 
when he was seventy-seven years old, and he 
was buried in the cemetery at Bethel Church, 
in this county. We have the following record 
of his children: (1) Thomas lived on part 
of his father's old place at Jacksonville, where 
he put up a gristmill, and later moved to near 
Georgeville, this county. He was twice mar- 
ried, first to Margaret Creviston, by whom 
he had four children: William, who was 
burned to death at Phoenix, Pa. ; John, who 
had a gristmill east of Punxsutawney, Pa.; 



850 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



and Samuel and Thomas, who went West. To 
his second marriage, with Catherine Barn- 
hart, were bom five children : Margaret, who 
married S. Hoover and (second) George 
Weaver, and lived in Perry township, Jeffer- 
son county, Pa.; Arr, who lived in Punxsu- 
tawney, Pa. ; Ogg, who was killed by a live 
wire at Horatio, Pa. ; Thomas, who was killed 
by a boiler explosion in Homer City, Pa. ; 
and Mary R., who married R. Trusel. (2) 
John lived near Jacksonville and was en- 
gaged in farming and sawmilling. He mar- 
ried Lydia Lewis and they had four children, 
John, Hugh, Rachel Loman and Kissie. (3) 
Mary died unmarried. (4) Rosanna died 
unmarried. (5) William was the father of 
John Neal. 

William Neal, son of William and Mary 
(Reynolds) Neal, was boi-n in Franklin 
county. Pa., on Caneoguages creek, and had 
little opportiiuity to acquire an education. 
He was noted in his day for his musical at- 
tainments. Prior to 1807 he settled on the 
Big Mahoning, where there were only two 
white settlers at that time, and it was he who 
ran the first raft down Big Mahoning creek. 
His home was half a mile from Perrysville, 
where he cleared three acres of what is now 
the Robert Hamilton farm. Later he moved 
to where Charles Neal now lives, in North 
Mahoning township, which place he im- 
proved, making his home there for a number 
of years. In 1832 he moved across the creek 
north, to where H. Neal now lives, and he 
died March 17, 1869, when nearly ninety 
years old, at the home of his son John, in West 
Mahoning township. In the early days he was 
noted for his skill and success as a hunter 
and trapper, one winter killing forty bears. 
He was well known in northern Indiana 
county and the adjoining territory in Jeffer- 
son county. Ten children were born to his 
first marriage, with Mary Cunningham, of 
Jacksonville, Pa., viz. : Abraham L., born 
Dec. 29, 1807, lived in West Mahoning town- 
ship. Elizabeth (Betsy), born Oct. 22. 1809, 
married Jacob Young. Ann, born Nov. 22, 
1811, married James JIcHenry, and lived at 
Northpoint, Pa. Catherine, born April 15, 
1813, married James Neal and (second) 
Joseph Sharp, and all are now deceased. John, 
born Dec. -4. 1816, married Rachel Blose, and 
is mentioned below. Thomas, born April 11, 
1818. lived in West Mahoning township ; he 
married Elizabeth McClellan and (second) 
Nancy Wingrove. Mary R., born Sept. 2, 
1820, maiTied Artemus Purdy and lived in 
Illinois. Sarah, born Sept. 2, 1823, married 



John Chambers. Margaret (Peggy), born 
Feb. 18, 1826, married Robert Patterson. 
Hardy Hill married Margaret Timblin; he 
lived in Porter township, Jefferson county. 

The second wife of William Neal was Susan 
Neff, by whom he had six children, namely: 
James C, a merchant of Perrysville, Pa., 
married Catherine Hadden ; Winfield Scott, 
of Perrysville, married Rebecca Piper ; Amelia 
(Millie) married Joseph Unkerphire; Euphe- 
mia died unmarried; Sauford. who married 
Lydia Lewis, was a land owner, and lived at 
Punxsutawney ; Sharp is mentioned else- 
where. 

John Neal, son of William and Mary ( Cun- 
ningham) Neal, bom Dec. 4, 1816, in North 
Mahoning township, had limited educational 
advantages, but he was a business man of 
ability and had practical experience which 
supplied any lack of early training. He lived 
along the Mahoning creek and was a pilot 
and raftsman on that stream, also engaging 
as a farmer and drover. He took an active 
part in the public affairs of his locality as a 
member of the Republican party, and held 
various township offices. His wife, Rachel 
(Blose), was born at Perrj^sville, Jeft'erson 
county, and died in October, 1906. Mr. Neal 
was killed on the Buffalo, Rochester & Pitts- 
burg railroad bridge Oct. 28. 1903. They 
were members of the M. E. Church. They 
were the parents of ten children, as follows: 
Cynthia is the widow of Joseph Coon, of 
North Mahoning township, Indiana county; 
Thomas Sharp is mentioned below; Martha 
is the widow of William McKillip, of West 
Mahoning township; George (deceased), who 
was a farmer, married Lueinda Van Horn; 
Aaron, of Seattle, Wash., who is engaged in 
breeding and dealing in fast horses, married 
Maggie Morgan, who is deceased ; Sarah mar- 
ried Peter Stear, of North IMahoning town- 
ship ; Emma married Frank 0. Harrat, of 
West Mahoning township ; Josiah lives in In- 
diana, Pa. ; William R., a traveling salesman, 
of Punxsutawney, Pa., married Cora Wins- 
low : I\Iary (deceased) was the wife of Austin 
Strickland, of Jefferson county. Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Thomas Sharp Neal lived at home until 
twenty-six years old and was reared to farm- 
ing on his father's place in North Mahoning 
township, where he lived for eighteen years. 
He obtained a common school education. 
Settling at Trade City, he engaged in the 
mercantile business, which he followed for 
eighteen years and also acted as postmaster. 
He has always been a prominent figure in 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



851 



official circles, has held numerous local offices, 
and in 1897 became sheriff of Indiana county, 
serving one term of three years, until 1900. 
He is at present supervisor of North Mahon- 
ing township. Mr. Neal's interests have be- 
come qiiite extensive, his various undertak- 
ings having been successful, and he now owns 
several farms, and residence property in 
Punxsutawney, Pa. He has a fine peach or- 
chard, eight hundred trees, located west of 
Trade City. His fine home in that town was 
built in 1912. Mr. Neal has bought and sold 
considerable timber in his day; one fall he 
sold 140,000 cuhiQ. feet. He became a pilot 
on the Big Mahoning when fifteen years old, 
and has been familiar with lumbering opera- 
tions in their various branches, becoming very 
well acquainted all over the county in this 
connection and in following his other indus- 
trial interests. 

In 1866 Mr. Neal married Annie Oberlin, 
of Pittsburg, and seven children have been 
born to this marriage: Preston died when 
nine years old; Naoma married Dr. George 
E. Simpson, of Indiana, Pa. ; Lawrence grad- 
uated from the State normal school at In- 
diana, Pa., attended law school at Ann Arbor, 
Mich., and went to Seattle, Wash., where he 
is a practicing attorney (he is married and 
has one child) ; Selina married Ezekiel Bar- 
ber, of Dixonville, Pa. ; Irene married Joseph 
Buchanan, of Dubois, Pa. ; Harry, M. D., is 
practicing medicine at Indiana, Pa. ; Walter, a 
farmer and mill man at Trade City, married 
Emma Smith. 

Mr. and Mrs. Neal are active members of 
the Lutheran Church at Trade City, Pa., and 
politically he is a stanch member of the Re- 
publican party. 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON ALLISON, 

M. D., is now, after many years of iisefulness 
in his profession, living retired on the farm 
where he was born, in East Mahoning town- 
ship, Indiana county. He was in active prac- 
tice for about forty years, throughout which 
period he was in Indiana county, though at 
various locations. 

The Allisons were among the first white set- 
tlers in Indiana county. Robert Allison, the 
founder of the family in this country, was 
a native of County Derry, Ireland, whence 
he came to this counti-y as a young man, in 
1750, locating in Cumberland county. Pa. In 
1752 he married a lady by the name of Re- 
becca (Beckie) Beard, a granddaughter of 
Charles Stuart, a descendant of the house of 
Stuart. Robert and Beckie had been pas- 



sengers on the same vessel and formed an ac- 
quaintance at that time which resulted in 
their marriage two years later. The result 
of this union was six sons and one daughter, 
the names of the sons being Tate, John, An- 
drew, Robert, James and Thomas; the daugh- 
ter, Jane, married William Hamilton. The 
Allison family fled from Scotland during the 
time of the persecution of the Protestants, 
settling in the North of Ireland. 

Coming west to what is now Indiana county. 
Pa., the Allison family located in Center town- 
ship, on what is now known as the McCon- 
aughey place near Homer City. One of the 
sons, Andrew, boni in Cumberland county 
in 1757, "after following General Washing- 
ton through the most gloomy period of the 
Revolution," returned to his father's family 
in Cumberland county, but did not remain 
there long. In 1785 he crossed the mountains 
and settled in Westmoreland county, near 
the site of the present village of New Derry. 
There he commenced an improvement, making 
his home with John Pumroy in times of peace, 
and when the Indians invaded the settlement 
he took refuge in a fort in the vicinity. Dur- 
ing his sojourn in Westmoreland county the 
settlement was frequently attacked by In- 
dians, and several men were killed and others 
wounded. In 1788 he sold his improvements 
to Francis Pumroy, crossed the Conemaugh 
river and settled on the bank of Twolick, on 
the site of an old Indian town, opposite what 
was later the village of Homer. Here he 
built a cabin and cleared some ground for 
agricultural purposes. The cabin was without 
a door, a hole in one side serving for entrance. 
In the year 1790 his father came from Cum- 
berland county, and took charge of his im- 
provements, Andrew going farther into the 
forest and opening up the farm later owned 
by Archy Nichol, three miles east of Indiana. 
"Here he was the frontier settler, with noth- 
ing between him and the Susquehanna river 
but the howling wilderness, abounding with 
wild beasts, and traversed by hostile savages. ' ' 
In October of that year he married Sally 
Barr, and they remained at that location 
until 1792, when the Indians again showed 
hostility and they fled with their one child, 
to the nearest neighbor, Ii-win Adams. Re- 
turning after several days to look after his 
farm, and get some articles that had been left, 
Andrew Allison found that the cabin with all 
its contents had been burnt by the Indians. 
He returned to his father's place on Twolick 
and Yellow creek, on an improvement made 
at an earlier date by one John Henry, who 



852 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



returned to his i'oi-iuei' home in Virginia on 
account of the dangers of the locality. Alli- 
son remained there until 1795, when he pur- 
chased an improvement made in 1772 by 
Joseph Hopkins, about three miles south of 
Indiana, Hopkins and his family having left 
on account of Indian troubles. Here again 
he was on the frontier, with neither a horse 
nor a public road, bridge, church or school- 
house within ten miles. It was trulj' a se- 
cluded spot; the silence of the forest was 
seldom broken, except by the howling wolves, 
the yelling panthers or the crack of the hunt- 
er's rifle. Here he spent the remainder of 
his days, and cleared out a large farm. He 
died in 1815, aged fifty-eight years. 

John Allison, another of the sons of Robert 
and Beckie (Beard) Allison,' was a miller, 
he and his sons following milling and farming 
in this section for j'ears. His descendants 
are still to be found among the best citizens 
of the county, and a lengthy account of this 
branch of the family will be found elsewhere 
in this work. 

Robert Allison, fourth son of Robert and 
Beckie (Beard) Allison, was the ancestor of 
Dr. Alexander H. Allison. Bom about 1768 
in Cumberland county. Pa., he came west 
with his parents and settled near what is 
Homer City, in Center township, where the 
family acquired land and engaged in farming. 
He continued to make his home in that sec- 
tion the remainder of his life, owning and 
operating the first gristmill in the locality; 
he built the race to run it. Mr. Allison died 
there in 1832, at the age of sixty-four years, 
and is buried in the cemeteiy of Bethel 
Church in Center township. He was a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Allison 
married four times. His firet wife was Mary 
Simpson, his second Ann Ramsey, by whom 
he had two sons : Robert T., who married Isa- 
belle Brown; and David Ramsey, a doctor, 
who died at Salt.sburg, this county, and who 
married Lydia Roney. His third marriage 
was to Nancy Riddle, whose children were: 
John R. ; William B., who married Auij 
Brown; Thomas B., who married Hannah 
Dickey and (second) Isabelle Kinter; and 
Andrew B. By his fourth union, with Rhoda 
Anderson, Mr. Allison had three children: 
Rebecca J., who married George Bratton; 
Samuel A., who married Mary E. Bothel and 
(second) Jennie McCluskey; and Margaret, 
who married George Hammers. 

John R. Allison, son of Robert and Nancy 
(Riddle) Allison, was liorn in Center town- 
ship, near Homer City, and Ihero grew to 



manhood. About 1837 he came to what is 
now East Mahoning township, locating on 
what was known as the William Riddle tract, 
a farm of two hundred acres which at that 
time was a wilderness. By occupation he 
was a carpenter, ha^•ing learned the trade 
from Colonel Altimus, of Indiana, and he 
continued to follow that calling for some 
years. He built the first house in Brook- 
ville, Jefifei"son county. Settling on the farm, 
he first lived in a house constructed of round 
logs, later building a frame dwelling and 
making various other improvements on the 
place. He did not live to enjoy for long the 
comforts which he gained by his industry, 
dying Dee. 7, 1853, at the age of forty-five 
years, six or seven months. He was buried 
in Gilgal cemetery. He was a Presbyter- 
ian, attending the Gilgal Church, and was 
active in its work, serving as trustee and Sab- 
bath school teacher. He was a well-read man 
for his day, a good penman, and looked upon 
by all who knew him as a valuable and in- 
telligent citizen. He filled the office of col- 
lector of taxes. 

Mr. Allison mai'ried Rebecca James, who 
was born in 1814 of English descent. She 
died Jan. 25, 1884, and was buried in the 
cemetery of Gilgal Church. Like her hus- 
band she was a Presbyterian in religious 
connection. They had a large family, viz.: 
Nancy Jane (deceased) married Henxy K. 
Dilts; William R., who was a prominent law- 
ver of Indiana, serving as district attorney 
■from 1871 to 1874. died in 1883, at the age 
of forty-six yeai-s; Robert died young; Alex- 
ander Hamilton is mentioned below; Andrew 
W. became a member of Company A, 61st 
United States Regiment (regular army), 
served during the Civil war, and died while 
in the army; Adeline married Ebert Kinter, 
and they are the parents of Mrs. John B. Me- 
Cormack, of East Mahoning township: M;ir- 
garet L. is deceased ; John Harry resides in 
East Mahoning township ; Robert Cromwell 
T., a physician, resides in Chicago, 111. ; So- 
phia married William H. Kinter and resides 
in Grant township, Indiana county. 
. Alexander Hamilton Allison was born June 
6, 1842, and was reared on his father's farm. 
He received excellent educational advantages 
for the day, attending public school in the 
home locality and the Glade Run and Covode 
academies. For a shoi-t period he taught 
school in Jeflt'erson county. As he was only 
eleven years old when his father died he had 
to assist witli the work at home from early 
l)oylioo(l, but Ills ambition was to enter pro- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



853 



life. When a young man he began 
to study medicine, under Drs. McEwen and 
Ansley, of Plumville, in 1862, later entering 
Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia, 
from which institution he was graduated 
March 4, 1867. On May 13th of that year 
he began the independent practice of his pro- 
fession at Cookport, Indiana county, where 
he was the pioneer physician, and he con- 
tinued to reside there for a period of thirteen 
years, building up a fine practice and be- 
coming prominently associated with the de- 
velopment of the best interests of the place. 
In 1880 he moved to Marion Center, where 
he was established for the nineteen years fol- 
lowing, and there he not only commanded a 
wide practice but also became engaged in the 
drug business, which he began in 1881. In 
1884 he built a fine store for the accommoda- 
tion of his growing trade, and carried it on 
for some years. In 1899 he moved from Mar- 
ion Center to the borough of Indiana, where 
he was engaged in practice for the next seven 
years, retiring in 1907 because his health 
could no longer stand the demands of his 
professional labors. While practicing he had 
given some attention to agricultural and busi- 
ness pursuits, owning the old Allison home- 
stead in East Mahoning township, where he 
kept some of the finest thoroughbred horses 
to be found in Indiana county. There he 
took up his home when he withdrew from his 
profession, and he now gives all his atten- 
tion to farming and kindred pursuits, having 
his fine tract of two hundred acres under 
first-class cultivation. His enterprising and 
progressive ideas have been put into practice 
in its improvement. He has never lost his 
love for fine horses and still takes consider- 
able interest in raising thoroughbreds. For 
some years be conducted the Marion Cream- 
ery, turning out from one hundred to two 
hundred pounds of butter daily, shipping to 
various parts of the county. It was destroyed 
by fire. Dr. Allison is one of the oldest sur- 
viving physicians in the county who practiced 
under the old order of things. He and Dr. 
W. B. Ansley of Plumville read medicine to- 
gether at Plumville. 

In politics Dr. Allison has always been a 
stanch adherent to the principles of the Demo- 
cratic party, and he was a strong admirer of 
President Cleveland. In 1893 he was ap- 
pointed postmaster at Marion Center, and 
served four years, proving a painstaking and 
highly satisfactory incumbent of the office. 
He also served as burgess of Marion Center, 
as member of the council board and school 



director, being thoroughly public-spirited and 
interested in the welfare of the community 
in which he made his home. He has been a 
member of Gilgal Presbyterian Church for 
fifty years and has been active in all its work, 
serving as trustee, Sunday school teacher and 
its siaperintendent ; his wife is also a member 
of that church and teaches in the Sunday 
school. Socially Dr. Allison belongs to the 
I. 0. 0. F. lodge at Cookport, is a past grand 
of that lodge and a member of the Grand 
Lodge of the State. He is a member of the 
Indiana County Medical Society. 

In 1863, during Lee's threatened invasion 
of Pennsylvania, he was in the army for a 
short period, having enlisted in Company B, 
62d Regiment, Pennsylvania Militia. 

On July 4, 1879, Dr. Allison married Mary 
Lockhard, who was born in Green township, 
this county, daughter of David and Sarah 
Jane (Jones) Lockhard. Her father owned 
the well-known Lockhard flour miUs of In- 
diana. Dr. and Mrs. Allison had one child. 
Birdie, who died in Marion Center when six 
and a half years old. 

MISS JANE E. LEONARD is an educator, 
one of the most widely known and honored in 
the State. She and her father were born at 
Leonard, near Clearfield, Pa. Leonard's sta- 
tion, Leonard's run, the "Leonard House," 
and the Leonard graded schools are traces of 
her father and his brothers. 

On her mother's side Miss Leonard is 
descended from a line of Quakers from Wil- 
liam Penn's time — ^Quakers who were official 
members of the first Yearly Meeting in Phila- 
delphia. 

The aim and work of Miss Leonard's life 
is that of a teacher. She has spent almost 
the whole of her adult life in the two leading 
normal schools of the State, first as a student 
and then as a teacher in the normal school 
at Millersville. Later, when the normal 
school at Indiana was founded, she was called 
there and there she has remained ever since, 
holding both the office as preceptress as well 
as acting as instructor. She has seen the 
school grow gradually, from thirty boarders 
the first winter of its existence — the winter 
of 1875 — to more than a thousand students 
now. She looks upon what she may have done 
for Indiana as her life's work, and the honor 
and esteem of its students as her life's re- 
ward. I . I 

FRANCIS BRADLEY CAMP is one of 
the leading citizens of Montgomery township, 



854 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Indiana county, where he has been associated 
with some of the most progressive enterprises 
which have characterized the advancement of 
the region. He has the strength of purpose 
and executive abilitj' which have been marked 
traits of all the members of the Camp family 
in this section, where his grandfather settled 
some twenty-five years ago. 

Heth F. Camp came to Indiana county in 
1837 from Washington, D. C, in the inter- 
est of a land company, for whom he continued 
to act as agent the remainder of his life, 
selling thousands of acres of land in this 
vicinity. He settled at what is now Cherry- 
tree, laid out that town, and sold the land on 
which it stands. Though he lived only twelve 
years after his arrival here, dying in 1849, 
he had borne a large part in the early activi- 
ties of the locality, becoming interested in 
farming on his own account, engaging in the 
mercantile business and also acting as civil 
engineer. He had married in Connecticut 
Phoebe Bates, and they had a family of five 
children, of whom Elizabeth M. Camp, a resi- 
dent of Cherrj'tree, is now the only survivor. 
Eben Bates Camp, son of Heth F. and 
Phoebe (Bates) Camp, was born Jan. H, 
1825, in Connecticut, and was but a boy when 
the family settled in Indiana county. He at- 
tended public school and an academy at In- 
diana, this county, and had entered college, 
but was called home upon the death of his 
father to look after his landed interests. Few 
men of his day were more intimately asso- 
ciated with the progress and development of 
this locality. He continued the general mer- 
cantile business established by his father, be- 
ing interested in that line for fifty years alto- 
gether. He also followed lumbering, buying, 
selling and rafting timber on the Susque- 
hanna river, was a civil engineer, and in fact 
was an all-around active business man. He 
retired about twenty years before his death. 
He held the offices of school director and 
member of the town council, and was a great 
worker in the Presbyterian Church, serving 
for years as ruling elder and trustee. He died 
July 3, 1910. 

Mr. Camp married Frances E. "Waller, a 
native of Washington, D. C, born IMarch 17, 
1830, member of one of the oldest families of 
Montgomery township, and she survives him, 
still residing at Cherrytree. Of the seven 
children born to this union two are deceased : 
Arthur Bates, wlio was an attorney, of Chi- 
cago, 111. ; and Maria Coe, who married Rev. 
Thomas W. Hine, of Saulsburg, Pa. The five 
surviving are: Cecilia Crawford, wife of Rev. 



Thomas Parry, who was a minister of the 
Presbyterian Church for many years and is 
now .superannuated (they reside at Cherry- 
tree) ; Eben Howard, of Mountain City, Tenn., 
a lumber manufacturer; Fi-ancis Bradley; 
Hannah Waller, wife of William M. Boal, of 
Ronceverte, W. Va. ; and Everett Brace, a 
lumber manufacturer, of Waynesville, North 
Carolina. 

Francis Bradley Camp was born July 28, 
1857, in Indiana county, and was reared at 
Cherrytree, receiving his early education 
there in the public schools. He also attended 
the Glade Run academy, in Armstrong coun- 
ty. When twenty-two years old he was taken 
into partnership with his father in the gen- 
eral store, the firm becoming E. B. Camp & 
Son, and continued to hold an interest in 
same until his father sold out and retired. 
He also established a wholesale lumber busi- 
ness which he conducted successfully for 
some time, and for a number of years he has 
been engaged in farming, having a fine place 
of two hundred acres in Montgomery town- 
ship, one of the best farms in that township, 
tastefully improved and thoroughly well kept 
up. Several local entei-prises which mark the 
progress of this section have counted him 
among their early advocates. He was one of 
the organizers of the Farmers' Telephone 
Companj^ and has been president since it was 
established ; was one of the organizers of 
Schryock Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, 
and is now sei-ving as master of that body ; 
and was one of the early friends of the rural 
free delivery system, doing his share toward 
the practical realization of what seemed to 
many an impossibility. He has served twenty 
years as school director of his township. He 
is a leading worker in the Presbyterian 
Church, being a ruling elder, and formerly 
served as ti-ustee; and he is equally inter- 
ested in the Sunday school, being president 
of the Presbyterian District Sunday School 
Association. 

Mr. Camp married Elizabeth Notley. 
daughter of John F. and Amanda (Jones) 
Notley, of Montgomery township. Her father, 
who was a farmer and lumberman, came to 
Indiana county about 1836, and I\Ir. Camp's 
grandfather sold the Notley family their fii-st 
farm here, a tract of one hundred acres. Mr. 
Notley was reluctant about buying, saying, 
"No, we can't live there: uothingr cleared." 
So Mr. Camp clinched the sale by clearing ten 
acres. The property is now owned by Francis 
B. Camp. Jlr. and Mrs. Camp have had five 
children, of whom Leila Waller died when 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



855 



fifteen years old, and Arthur Brown when 
two years old. The three who survive are: 
Howard Delmout, who lives at home and as- 
sists his father on the fai-m; John Notley, a 
student of the Philadelphia Medical School, 
of Temple College, at Philadelphia; and 
James Jones, at home. 

HUGH ALEX McISAAC, farmer, dairy- 
man and stock raiser of North Mahoning 
township, Indiana county, was born Sept. 
24, 1859, in that township, son of Robert and 
Mary (McCune) Mclsaae. 

Hugh Melsaac, the grandfather of Hugh 
A. McIsaac, was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, 
and there married Jane McKisock. 'They 
came to the United States in 1827, and after 
a six weeks' voyage on a sailing vessel landed 
at Philadelphia, remaining in that locality 
.for several years thereafter. Subsequently 
they moved to Westmoreland county. Pa., 
and lived on the Chestmit Ridge until 1843, 
when they came to North ]\Iahoning township 
and located about one and a half miles south- 
west of Marchand. Here they secured about 
two hundred acres of wild land, on which 
there had been made a small clearing, and a 
log cabin and stable had been erected. On 
this farm they spent the remainder of their 
lives, Hugh McIsaac dying Aug. 28, 1865, 
and his wife April 6, 1853. They were mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian Church. Their chil- 
dren were: Matilda, who married Joseph 
Murphy, of Ligonier, Pa. ; Jane, who became 
the wife of Robert Pollock, formerly of In- 
diana county ; Robert ; and two children who 
died in youth. 

Robert McIsaac, son of Hugh, and father of 
Hugh A. McIsaac, was born March 29, 1823. 
in Ayrshire, Scotland, and was four years 
of age when he was brought to this country 
by his parents. He had only a limited educa- 
tion, but was observant, made the most of his 
opportunities, and became a well informed 
man. At the age of twenty-seven years he 
was married to Mary McCune, who was born 
in Derry township, Westmoreland county. 
Pa., daughter of Alex and Martha (ilclntire) 
McCune, natives of Ireland, and pioneer 
farming people of Westmoreland county. Mr. 
McCune died in 1870, and his wife the year 
following. Their children were : Sarah, who 
married James Kinley and (second) Han-ison 
Gourley, and lived in Armstrong county; 
Mary, Mrs. McIsaac ; Eliza, who married Wil- 
liam McClelland, a merchant of Kittanning, 
Pa. ; James, who farmed the homestead in 
Westmoreland county; Nancy, who married 



Smith White, of Delaware county, N. Y. ; 
Martha, who married Jonathan Doty, of Ash- 
land, Ohio; John, who went to California 
and later to South America, where he died; 
and Margaret, who married Samuel Barnett, 
of Latrobe, Pennsylvania. 

In 1843 Robei't McIsaac came with his pai-- 
ents to North Mahoning township, and with 
them settled down to the hard work inciden- 
tal to the struggles of a family to gain a foot- 
hold in a strange and uncultivated section. 
Reared to the life of an agi-iculturist, he con- 
tinued to follow that vocation throughout his 
life, and died in 1898 on the old home place, 
where he had spent his entire mature life. 
His wife, Mary (McCune), died Dec. 29, 
1893, preceding him five years. Mr. Mc- 
Isaac was an active church worker. He was 
called upon to write for a number of news- 
papers, but never entered public life, his am- 
bitions being satisfied by his farm and his 
home. He and his wife were the parents of 
the following children: (1) Matilda, born 
July 24, 1857, is unmarried and living on the 
old home place. (2) Hugh Alex is mentioned 
below. (3) Robert James, born January 12, 
1862, attended Geneva College, graduating 
with honors in 1889, following which he took 
a theological course in the Reformed Presby- 
terian Seminary at Allegheny, Pa. He was 
superintendent of missions at Knox Academy, 
Selma, Ala., principal of Knox Academy, 
and is now located at Beaver Palls, Pa., where 
he holds a professorship in Geneva College. 
He married Hannah Howland, and has two 
sons, Milton, attending Geneva College, and 
Archibald, a public school student. (4) John 
Brown, born March 19, 1867, a graduate of 
Geneva College, is now pastor of the United 
Presbyterian Church at Leechburg, Pa. He 
married Matilda Belle Murphy, and has three 
children, Howard, George and Helen. 

Hugh Alex Mclsaae received an academic 
education, following which he taught school 
for two terms in North Mahoning township, 
one term in East Mahoning township and one 
term in Jefferson county. Pa. He was mar- 
ried Aug. 6, 1890, to Mary T. Stewart, of 
Rayburn township, Armstrong county, Pa., 
daughter of John D. and Elizabeth (Harris) 
Stewart, the former of County Donegal, Ire- 
land, son of James Stewart, of Scotland, and 
grandson of David Stewart. The last named 
went to Ireland as a young man, and there 
married Elizabeth Scott, by whom he had 
seven sons and two daughters. He was a 
strong Presbyterian, and took his sons regu- 
larly to services, the whole party riding horse- 



856 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



back. James Stewart married Rebecca Dook, 
and in 1827 they came to America on the 
sailing vessel "Lazy Manchester." landing 
at Philadelphia after a voyage of thirteen 
weeks. They started from that city on the 
old turnpike, intending to go to Pittsburg, 
but when they had reached the old Geiger 
Hotel they were advised not to go further, be- 
cause of the scarcity of work. In 1830, how- 
ever, they came as far as Caldwell furnace, 
in Armstrong county. James and Rebecca 
Stewart had children as follows: George 
went to New Orleans, La., and married a 
planter's daughter, and later went to Kings- 
ton, 6a., where both died; David, who mar- 
ried Peggy Oliver and (second) JMary Ann 
Sirens, was a farmer in Armstrong county; 
Fannie Ann married Matthew Steele, a flour 
merchant of Pittsburg; James, a farmer, 
married Isabella Dill, of Rural Valley, Pa., 
and had eleven children; John D. was the 
father of Mrs. Mclsaac. 

John D. Stewart was married in 1852 to 
Elizabeth Harris, daughter of Joseph and 
Ann (Powers) Harris, natives of County 
Derry, Ireland, and pioneers of Armstrong 
county, and owners of land near Kittanning, 
where both died. They were parents of four 
children: Joseph, who died when about fif- 
teen years of age; a daughter that died in 
infancy; Elizabeth, Mrs. Stewart, and Wil- 
liam, deceased, a farmer, who married Re- 
becca Powers and had three children. 

Mr. Stewart received a public school edu- 
cation, and worked at home until he was 
twenty-five years of age, at which time he 
secured a position on the Pennsylvania canal, 
receiving fourteen dollars per month. Later 
he purchased a farm in Rayburn township, 
Armstrong county, and two and a half years 
later was there married. He continued to be 
engaged in agricultural pursuits during the 
remainder of his life, and died in the spring 
of 1904, his wife having passed away seven 
years previously. Both were faithful mem- 
bers of the Reformed Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mclsaac have had children 
as follows: John Stewart, born May 3, 1893, 
attended the home schools and Indiana nor- 
mal school, where he was graduated in 1911, 
taught school for one term in North Mahon- 
ing township, and a school at Plumville, and 
is now attending Geneva College at Beaver 
Falls, Pa. ; Robert Hugh, born April 6. 1897, 
has been educated in the home schools; Alex 



McCune died in infancy Dec. IS, 1902 ; Mary 
Elizabeth was born Jan. 29, 1905. Mrs. Mc- 
lsaac is a woman of character and refine- 
ment, and prior to her marriage was for 
some years engaged in teaching school in 
Kittanning, Pennsylvania. 

In 1905 Mr. Mclsaac built his present fine 
residence, a ten-room home, two and a half 
stories in height, and his commodious 51 by 
51 foot barn, with silo attached, which ac- 
commodates twenty 'head of cattle and six 
horses. He keeps ordinarily from nine to 
eighteen thoroughbred Jerseys, with about 
twelve milch cows, and finds a ready market 
for his cream in Punxsutawney. His hogs 
are of the Chester "White breed, and a fine 
flock of Plymouth Rock and Wyandotte chick- 
ens gives evidence of his skill as a poultry- 
man. About 100 of his 170 acres are under the 
plow, and "Morven Farm," as it is known, 
is one of the most valuable of its size in 
North Mahoning township. Among his busi- 
ness associates Mr. Mclsaac is known as a man 
who can be thoroughly and implicitly relied 
upon ; as a citizen he assists all movements 
tending toward good government, while his 
wide circle of friends will willingly testify 
to the fact that, having succeeded himself, 
he is ever ready to lend a helping hand to 
others who are trying to succeed. 

GEORGE HUNTER, M. D., one of the 
leading medical practitioners of Blairsville, 
Indiana county, is accounted one of the most 
public-spirited citizens of that borough. 
His uncle. Dr. William Hunter, was for years 
one of the foremost physicians in this section 
of the country, and he has maintaned the high 
reputation of the name in the medical pro- 
fession bj' his own skillful and conscientious 
services to a wide circle of patients. 

Dr. Hunter is a native of the State of 
Indiana, born Sept. 27, 1863, at Idaville, 
where his parents had settled some time pre- 
viousl.y. His grandfather, James D. Hunter, 
was a native of Londonderry, Ii-eland, where 
he grew to manhood, and there married Nan- 
cy Dougherty. In 1838 the family came to 
America, locating at Greensburg. Pa., where 
j\Ir. Hunter made a permanent home, there 
spending the remainder of his life. He died 
there in 1851; his wife survived him until 
1881. 

Thomas Hunter, son of James D. Hunter, 
was born in Greensburg, and there grew to 
maoliood. He learned the trade of painter, 
wliicli lie followed both in his native town 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



857 



and in Philadelphia. Moving West to the 
State of Indiana, he located at Idaville, where 
he followed his trade until his death, which 
occurred Aug. 28, 1872, while he was still in 
the prime of his life; he was buried there. 
Mr. Hunter was a member of the United 
Presbyterian Church and a Republican in 
politics. His first wife, Elizabeth (Dimmit), 
died May 11, 1854, and is buried at Idaville. 
She was the mother of three children: Wil- 
liam J., who resides in Idaville, Ind. ; Levina, 
who married Jonathan Ireland; and a child 
that died in infancy. Thomas Hunter mar- 
ried for his second wife Lavina Dimmit, sis- 
ter of his first wife, and she died Sept. 4, 
1872, and is buried in Idaville. She was a 
member of the U. P. Chiirch. The following 
children were born to this union: Joseph, 
who resides in the State of Indiana ; Prank, 
who is a farmer at Andover, Ashtabula Co., 
Ohio ; George ; Anna ; John Wesley, who died 
young; Elizabeth, who married Benjamin 
Sherif, of Blairsville, Pa. ; Amanda, who mar- 
ried David Forest; and Ida M., who died 
Sept. 22, 1872, in infancy. 

George Hunter was only in his ninth year 
when he lost both his father and mother by 
death. He and his sister Elizabeth were 
taken to Blairsville by their uncle. Dr. Wil- 
liam Hunter, and at Blairsville the young 
orphan began his education, first attending 
the public school. He also studied in the 
Blairsville academy, and eventually took up 
the study of medicine under the preceptor- 
ship of his uncle. Dr. Hunter. Later he en- 
tered Hahnemann Medical College, at Phila- 
delphia, where he graduated in 1886, with 
the degree of M. D. Returning to Blairsville 
he practiced his chosen calling for a while 
with his uncle, and then opened an office of 
his own, on North Walnut street, where he 
has been located ever since. His devotion to 
his work, and the confidence his experience 
and skill have created, has increased his pat- 
ronage until his practice is very extensive. 
Though his professional work occupies the 
greater part of his time, and he also has 
farming interests, he has taken opportunity 
to serve his fellow citizens in a public capac- 
ity, having been a member of the street com- 
mittee and being at present a member of the 
borough council. In political connection he 
is a Republican. He is an influential mem- 
ber of the United Presbyterian Church of 
Blairsville, of which he is elder. 

On Nov. 18, 1896, Dr. Hunter was married 
in Blairsville to May Eleanor Lintner, a 



native of Blairsville, daughter of J. P. and 
Violet Lintner. Mi-s. Hunter is also a mem- 
ber of the United Presbyterian Church and 
much interested in church work. 

REV. JOHN AV. FYOCK, pastor of the 
Church of the Brethren in Green township, 
Indiana county, and also engaged in farming 
there, is a well-known resident of that sec- 
tion, doing good work in his ministerial capac- 
ity and highly esteemed as a man of honor- 
able character and the good qualities which 
make for useful citizenship. He was born 
in Green township Jan. 22, 1861, son of 
David and Catherine (Wise) Pyock, gi-and- 
son of John Fyock and great-grandson of 
David Fyock. David Fyock and his son 
John moved into this region at an early day, 
from Somerset county. Pa. They are buried 
in the cemetery at Taylorsville, in Green 
township. John Fyock bought land in that 
township, which he farmed until his death; 
he and his father were blacksmiths as well 
as farmers, and followed that trade in con- 
nection with agricultural work. 

David Fyock, father of Rev. John W. 
Fyock, was bom in Somerset county, and 
came with his father to Green township when 
quite young. He passed the rest of his life 
there, farming until his death, which occurred 
in 1893. He married Catherine Wise, daugh- 
ter of Solomon Wise, an e^rly settler in this 
part of Indiana county, who followed farm- 
ing in Green township. Mrs. Fyock died in 
1865. She was the mother of five children, 
the eldest being Tillie M., wife of Edward 
Donahey, a resident of Grant township, this 
county ; Benjamin lives in Johnstown, Pa. ; 
John W. is mentioned below; Catherine and 
Moses are deceased. 

John W. Fyock obtained his early educa- 
tion in the common schools of Green town- 
ship. He began fanning in boyhood, and fol- 
lowed it for several years before he entered 
upon his regular preparation for the min- 
istry, in 1892. His first pastorate was the 
Manor congi-egation in Green township, and 
he is now pastor of the Church of the Breth- 
ren in that township, where his work has been 
very successful. 

, On April 2, 1885, Mr. Fyock was married 
to Elvira Minser, a native of Lawrence 
county, Pa., daughter of Mark and Elizabeth 
(Stanley) Minser, who came to Indiana 
county and lived in Green township for thirty 
years. Mr. Minser is deceased, and Mrs. 
Minser, now (1912) eighty-four years old, 
makes her home with Mr. and Mrs. Fyock. 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Pyoek: Earl, the eldest, was accidentally 
killed when seven years old, having been run 
over by a wagon; Bessie E. is the wife of Bert 
Pyoek, a resident of Grant township; Ray 
L. is engaged in teaching public school in 
Green township; Mark G., Anna Mary and 
Ira J. are at home. 



ADA:\I T. STIVER, who is enj 
general farming operations in Canoe town- 
ship, Indiana county, where he is also a mem- 
ber of the board of supervisors, was born 
near McKeesport, Pa., April 22, 1856, son of 
Daniel and Elizabeth (Lutz) Stiver. 

Daniel Stiver, father of Adam T. Stiver, 
was bom in Armstrong county. Pa., and was 
there married to Elizabeth Lutz, a native of 
Hersburg, Germany. Moving to Indiana 
county, they settled on a farm of seventy- 
two acres located in Canoe township, a wild 
and unimproved tract, on which not a fur- 
row had been turned. He erected a log 
cabin, and with characteristic energy began 
the development of his land, which in eoiu'se 
of time was made to yield him abundant har- 
vests. There he continued to carry on agri- 
cultural pursuits until his death, which oc- 
curred when he was seventy-two years of age. 
In his youth he had not been able to gain 
many advantages of an educational nature, 
but close observation in later years, in con- 
nection with much reading, made hira an 
exceedingly well-informed man, and he was 
known for his many excellencies of mind and 
heart. His first wife died at the age of forty- 
four years, and he was married (second) to 
Louisa Mickel, of Canoe township, who is 
still living. Mr. Stiver and his first wife 
had a family of thirteen children, namely: 
Adam T. ; David, deceased, who married Mrs. 
Kate Toy, widow of Harvey Toy; Annie, 
who married Park Loyd, and both are de- 
ceased; Abraham, who is engaged in farm- 
ing in North iMahoning township; William, 
also a farmer in that district, who man-ied 
Melinda "Wining; Belle, who married Samuel 
Law, of Horatio, Pa.; Margaret, who mar- 
ried William Smith, of Juneau, Pa. ; Daniel, 
who died young; Emma, deceased, who mar- 
ried Joe Neal. of Horatio, Pa. ; Aaron, farm- 
ing a part of the homestead in Canoe town- 
ship, who married Annie Walker; Ella, who 
married W. C. Wliite, of Canoe township; 
Lizzie, deceased, who was the wife of George 



Lyke; and a daughter who died in infancy. 
Mr. Stiver and both his wives were members 
of the Evangelical Association. 

Adam T. Stiver, son of Daniel Stiver, went 
to the home schools when he could be spared 
from the work of the farm, his boyhood hav- 
ing been one of constant industry and hard, 
unremitting toil. The scenes and experiences g 
of pioneer life in Indiana county are familiar I 

to him, and when he was in his .youth the 
wild and unimproved condition of this sec- 
tion gave but little indication of the rapid 
changes M-hich were to work so wonderful a 
transformation. He continued to remain on 
the home farm until he was twenty-four 
years of age. On July 27, 1882, he was mar- 
ried to Eva Hefiflick, of Canoe township, 
daughter of John and Eliza (Emei-ick) Heff- 
liek, natives of Germany who came to the 
United States and settled in Canoe town- 
ship. They spent the i-emainder of their lives 
in this section, and their son David and 
daughter Mary now live on the homestead. 
Three children have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Stiver: (1) Walter E., the eldest, born 
Sept. 21, 1884, was educated in the public 
schools and the select summer schools, and was 
graduated from the State normal school, at 
Indiana, in 1910. Por several years before 
his graduation he was engaged in teaching, 
and has since continued to follow the pro- 
fession, having taught the Crawford school, 
a room at Rossiter, the Henry school, the 
Canoe school (all in Canoe township), at 
New Alexandria, in Westmoreland county, 
the Doty school in Grant township, and in the 
schools at Richmond, where he is now located. 
(2) Samuel Lee, the second child, was born 
July 22, 1886, was educated in the home and 
select schools, and also took up the vocation of 
educator, now being engaged in the Widdow- 
son school. (3) Edna Ruth, the youngest, 
born Sept. 17, 1900, attended the home schools 
and is now engaged in pursuing her musical 
studies, for which she has shown considerable 
talent. 

After his marriage ilr. Stiver purchased 
seventeen acres of the old homestead, on 
which he has made numeroiis improvements, 
and in addition to which he owns fifteen acres 
at Locust Lane, Pa. He has carried on gen- 
eral farming, and has been uniformly suc- 
cessful in his ventures. The high esteem in 
which he is held by his fellow citizens has 
been evidenced by his election to numeroias 
township offices. In 1888 he was chosen a 
member of the board of supervisors of Canoe 
township, and several times since. He has 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



859 



also held the offices of overseer of the 
poor, school director, inspector, road master, 
ti-easurer of the school board, and collected 
the road taxes, and at this time is efficiently 
serving in the capacity of supervisor. He 
has always been a stanch supporter of Demo- 
cratic principles and candidates. Mr. Stiver 
has also found time to devote to church work, 
attending St. Mark's United Evangelical 
Church, at Juneau, where he has acted as 
class leader and superintendent of the Sun- 
day school. 

THEODORE M. DONAHEY, of Tunnel- 
ton, Indiana county, general merchant and 
farmer, has a high reputation in his section 
for business ability and honor. He is a native 
of the county, born Feb. 17, 1856, in Young 
township, son of Samuel C. Donah ey and 
grandson of William and Sarah (Clawson) 
Donahey, who had a large family, namely: 
Samuel C, Richard, Benjamin, Joseph, An- 
drew, Ross, Ellis, William, Mary Ann, Re- 
becca, Sarah and Jane. 

Samuel C. Donahey was bom Feb. 6, 1822, 
in Young township, this county, and there 
followed farming and stock raising all his 
life, for many years also dealing in live stock, 
shipping to Philadelphia. He cultivated a 
farm of nearly two hundred acres, and was 
a successful and progressive man, though 
quiet in disposition and thoroughly unas- 
suming. He was interested in anything he 
believed would contribute to the general good, 
and was a generous supporter of the Hope- 
well M. E. Church in Blacklick township. 
He was a strong believer in the principles of 
the Democratic party. On March 5, 1846, 
Mr. Donahey married Lavina Clawson, who 
was born in Yoiing township, July 15, 1825, 
and died June 10, 1897. Mr. Donahey sur- 
vived her, passing away Dec. 24, 1907. They 
are buried in the Hopewell M. E. Church 
cemetery. Children as follows were born to 
them: (1) William Albert, born Jan. 9, 1847. 
married Sarah Thompson and (second) Sarah 
Ann Rosenberger. He resides at Tunnel- 
ton. (2) Sarah Jane, born Jan. 12, 1849, 
died Jan. 9, 1911, unmarried. (3) Richard 
Milton, born July 9, 1852, died Sept. 14, 
1870. (4) Theodore M. is mentioned below. 
(5) Anna Mary, born Oct. 28, 1858, married 
Robert IMontgomery Sheffler, a blacksmith 
and farmer living at West Lehanon, this 
county. (6) Samuel Henry, born Nov. 13, 
1861," married Anna Belle Morton. (7) 
John Clark, born Feb. 6, 1867, married Sarah 
M. Fulton, daughter of Joseph H. and Eliza- 



beth (Coulter) Fulton, and they have one 
son, Arthur LeRoy, born April 19, 1894. 
Mr. Donahey is in the trucking business in 
the borough of Indiana, in partnership with 
his brother Samuel. 

Theodore M. Donahey first attended the 
common schools in Young township, and later 
continued his studies at the Eldersridge acad- 
emy and the Indiana (Pa.) State normal 
school. He was engaged in teaching school 
for fourteen years, in Young township, 
Clarksburg, this county, Armstrong township, 
Conemaugh township and Jacksonville — all 
in Indiana county. He then (during the ad- 
ministration of President Cleveland) moved 
to Petersburg, Va., and for a period of six 
years carried on the mercantile business there, 
in 1898 returning to Young township, Indiana 
Co., Pa. After devoting himself to farming 
for a short time he moved to Tunnelton, in 
Conemaugh township, where he bought the 
general store of David Duncan, and has since 
been doing a thriving business at that point 
as butcher and general merchant. He owns 
a farm of sixty-two acres near by, which he 
cultivates, and he raises a large number of 
fine horses, in which line he has been highly 
successful. In fact, he has done well in all 
his undertakings, and is one of the most pros- 
perous citizens in his section. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics and a Presbyterian in religion. 

Mr. Donahey was married in September, 
1895, to Levina Logan Gould, daughter of 
Josiah Gould, of Petersburg, Va. They have 
no children. ' 

AUSTIN WEAMER CLOWES, a stock- 
holder and director of the Second National 
Bank of Plumville, and a farmer of South 
Mahoning township, was born in Washington 
township, this county, July 29, 1857. 

The Clowes family is of Welsh origin. 
Isaac Clowes, the first of the name of whom 
there is definite knowledge, married Anna 
Conner. 

John Clowes, a son of Isaac Clowes, was 
born in Sussex county, Del., Jan. 15, 1798, 
and grew to manhood in his native county. 
In 1820 he came to Indiana county, locating 
in Washington township on a farm which 
later became the property of William Sutton. 
Having learned carding and weaving prior 
to leaving Delaware, John Clowes followed 
this line of work in his new home and built 
a mill to manufacture woolens on his farm. 
He was a man of affairs for his day, owned 
and operated 300 acres of land, and made 
improvements as they were required. His first 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



house was built of round logs, as was his 
barn. In 1836 he sold his first farm and 
bought another, on which he died in October, 
1880, aged eighty -two years ; he was buried in 
the cemetery connected with the United Pres- 
byterian Church of Washington township. 
"While" not connected with anj' religious de- 
nomination, he lived according to the Golden 
Rule and was a most excellent man. 

In 1829 John Clowes married Sarah Hicks, 
a daughter of Isaac Hicks, and she died in 
1866, being buried in the same cemetery as 
her husband. She was a member of the 
United Presbyterian Church. The following 
children were born to John Clowes and his 
wife: Louise, who married George Lutz, of 
Rayne township ; Hannah, who married Wil- 
liam Jamison ; Lucinda, who married David 
Adams; Jacob; Isaac; Elsie, who married 
Reuben Heyes; David, who was a soldier 
during the Civil war, now living on the old 
homestead; John, who settled in Iowa; and 
Sarah, who is the widow of Archibald Mc- 
Adoo, of Young township. 

Jacob Clowes, son of John Clowes, and 
father of Austin Weamer Clowes, was born 
in Washington township in 1834, and was 
reared and educated in his native place. He 
worked on the home farm until he came of 
age, at which per-iod he began fai-ming for 
himself on eighty-seven acres of land in Wash- 
ington township. After operating this pro- 
perty for a time he added other land, being 
the possessor of ISO acres at the time of his 
death, which occurred on his homestead in 
1892. His remains were interred in the 
Lutheran Church cemetery at Five Points. 
A good Lutheran, he gave his hearty support 
to the church, and being a temperate man 
was a member of the Prohibition party. For 
some time he was a school director, and did 
his full duty wherever placed. During the 
Civil war, he served his country for one 
year as a private in the same company as his 
brother David, and was never found lacking 
in any respect. 

Jacob Clowes married Mary Weamer, who 
was born in South Mahoning township, 
daughter of Jacob Weamer and sister of 
Andrew AVoamer, of South Mahoning town- 
ship. She died at the home of her daughter 
in Vandergrift, Pa., a consistent member of 
the Lutheran Church. The children of Jacol) 
Clowes and wife were: J. Clark, who was a 
carpenter, resides in Michigan ; Albert died 
when three months old ; Austin Weamer is 
mentioned below; Orville M. married S. R. 
Coulterby, of Vandergrift; Sarah Emma mar- 



ried Matthew McCreary; Altha May married 
Michael Mench ; Adda married James Peter- 
man ; Jay R. married i\Iary McCracken, of 
South Mahoning township, and resides at 
Denver, Colo.; Ferna Edith married Jack 
Fisher. 

Austin Weamer Clowes received a good 
common school education and worked at home 
until 1881, when he came to South Mahoning 
township, and located on a farm not far 
froiii the Armstrong county line. This farm 
contained 122 acres of laud and was formerly 
owned by Rev. Aaron Neff. For the last 
thirty-one years Mr. Clowes has been engaged 
in farming on his property, which he has de- 
veloped to a considerable extent, and in the 
raising of high-grade stock. He not only 
sells his own product but also deals quite 
extensively in cattle which he buys. His 
handsonie frame house was built by him, and 
he has in contemplation other improvements. 
While a busy man of affairs, he found time 
for a trip through the West with his wife, 
thus broadening his outlook and adding to 
his fund of experience. In addition to his 
agricultural interests, he is a stockholder and 
director of the Second National Bank of 
Plumville. An independent in political 
faith, he has served as a school director, su- 
pervisor and election inspector. The Baptist 
Church holds his membership, and receives 
his generous support. 

On Oct. 9, 1879, Mr. Clowes was married 
to Agnes J. Neff, of South Mahoning town- 
ship, a daughter of J. J. and Agnes (Davis) 
Neff, and a niece of Rev. Aaron Neff, who was 
a well-known Baptist divine of South Mahon- 
ing township in his day. Mrs. Clowes made 
her home with him prior to her maiTiage, 
and was trained by him in high Christian 
ideals. Mr. and Rlrs. Clowes have had the 
following children: Arthur N., who died of 
heart trouble May 15, 1906, and is buried in 
the cemetery connected ^vith the Baptist 
Church in South Mahoning township ; Anna, 
who married Henry IMarshall, of Henry 
county. 111.; Mabel Emma, who is at home; 
Alice Blanch, who lives in Henry county. 
111. ; Homer J., an electrician, of Pittsburg, 
and Beulah, Hazel and Wade, at home. 

W. L. SHIELDS, M. D., of Jacksonville, 
Indiana county, has been engaged in the prac- 
tice of medicine there twenty-four years, and 
is one of the active citizens of that borough, 
not only as a professional man of the high- 
est standing but also in his connection with 
local interests of a public nature. He was 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



861 



born in South ' Mahoning township, Indiana 
county, Feb. 3, 1863, son of Ralph G. Shields 
and grandson of James Shields. The latter 
was a native of Ireland and settled in Wash- 
ington township, this county, where he lived 
and died. He acquired land and followed 
farming. 

Ralph G. Shields, son of James, was born 
in Washington township and grew to man- 
hood there. He learned blaeksmithing and 
followed that occupation for a long period 
at Plumville, in South IMahoning township, 
where he remained to the end of his days. 
He is buried in Plumville cemetery. Mr. 
Shields was a Presbyterian in religious con- 
nection, and politically a Republican. His 
first wife, Mary Lydick, daughter of William 
B. Lydick, died in 1864, and he married 
(second) Sarah Streams or Stearns. There 
were two children by the first marriage, W. 
L. and a daughter that died in infancy. By 
the second union there were three : Anna, 
who married Samuel McClain (Mack) Miller, 
of Center township; Elda, who married 
Charles Hookey; and Blair, of Pittsburg. 

W. L. Shields obtained his early education 
in the public schools and attended Glade 
Run academy, at Dayton, Armstrong county, 
and for five years was engaged in teaching 
in public school in South Mahoning town- 
ship and at summer normal. He began his 
medical course at Jefferson Medical College, 
Philadelphia, which he attended in 1881-82, 
later studied at the Southeastern Tennessee 
College from 1882 to 1884, and aftei-ward 
attended the University of Kentucky at Louis- 
ville, graduating from that institution in 
1885, with the degi-ee of M. D. He practiced 
for a time at Louisville, Ky., and Nashville, 
Tenn., and then located at Dayton, Arm- 
strong Co., Pa., where he remained a few 
years, in 1889 coming to Jacksonville, Indiana 
county, where he succeeded Dr. W. R. Reed. 
He has been a conscientious physician, and 
has the esteem and patronage of a wide circle 
in the vicinity, where he is known and trusted 
as a friend as well as in his professional 
capacity. He is a member of the Indiana 
County Medical Society and of the Pennsyl- 
vania State Medical Society, and for ten years 
was a member of the United States pension 
examining board for Indiana county. He 
has served in various other public positions, 
having been school director for eighteen 
years, during which time he has been presi- 
dent and secretary of the board and one of 
its most efficient members; and he has been 
a member of the liorough council of Jackson- 



ville. He is a Republican politically, and in 
religious connection is a Presbyterian, being 
a valued member of the church, of which he 
is at present a trustee. Fraternally he holds 
membership in the I. 0. 0. F. 

In 1885 Dr. Shields married Nancy Bowser, 
of Plumville, daughter of Anderson and Mary 
(Templeton) Bowser, and she died at Jack- 
sonville and is biiried at Plumville. She was 
the mother of three childi'en : Jay H., who is 
manager for the Mahoning Supply Company, 
at Lucerne, Indiana county ; Edith, and Anna 
Martha. Dr. Shields' second marriage was 
to Lizzie Cunningham, daughter of Robert 
Cunningham, of Young township, Indiana 
county, and they have had four children: 
Robert DeL., Dorothy, Ralph (who died 
young), and William (who died young). 

Jay H. Shields, who is one of the well- 
known young men in his district, was born 
at Dayton, Armstrong Co., Pa., Aug. 11, 
1886. He attended Eldersridge academy 
when a boy and for several sessions studied 
at the Indiana State normal school, taking 
up a business course. For three terms he 
taught school, two in Blacklick township and 
one in Center township. Following this he 
went with the Ridge Supply Company at 
leelin, as bookkeeper, and continued there 
for a period of four years, at the end of which 
he went to Chambersville, Pa., for one year. 
For some time following he was with the 
Seneca Mercantile Company and from their 
employ changed to the Jefferson Supply 
Company, at Ernest, Pa. After remaining 
with that company until October, 1911, he 
accepted his present position as manager of 
the Mahoning Supply Company at Lucerne, 
which is among the largest houses in Indiana 
county and does a large business. He mar- 
ried Sara Leinbach, daughter of the late 
Daniel Leinbach, and they have one son, Wil- 
liam J. Mr. Shields is a member of Indiana 
Lodge, No. 313, F. & A. M., and Indiana 
Lodge of Elks. He is a Presbyterian in re- 
ligious connection. 

HENRY E. RONEY, a merchant of Trade 
City, Indiana county, was born at Kittanning, 
Armstrong Co., Pa., son of William G. and 
Elizabeth (Smith) Roney. Robert Roney, 
his grandfather, was a farmer of Westmore- 
land county. Pa., where he died. 

William G. Roney was born in Westmore- 
land county. Pa., while his wife was a native 
of Jefferson county. He grew up in hia 
native county, and in young manhood went 
to Puuxsutawney, Pa., where he engaged in 



862 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



lumbering until the breaking out of the Civil 
war. He enlisted during the first years of the 
conflict in Company L, 114th Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, was assigned to the Army 
of the Potomac, and was honorably discharged 
after three years of faithful service. Re- 
turning to Pennsylvania he went to Kittan- 
ning. Securing a farm in East Franklin 
township. Armstrong county, he lived upon it 
until 1885, when he came to North Mahon- 
ing township, this county, and here died. 
While living in Armstrong county William 
G. Roney served as county auditor, as super- 
visor of his township and held other lesser 
offices. He was active in the ranks of the 
Republican party. In religious matters he 
was a Baptist. He and his wife, who is also 
deceased, became the parents of the follow- 
ing children: John, deceased, was a black- 
smith at Slatelick, Pa., being in business for 
years with his brother Robert, and went to 
McKeesport, Pa. ; he married Fannie Henry. 
Robert, after leaving his brother John, went 
into an undertaking and furniture business 
at Kittanning, Pa., and is now in the wagon 
business at Latrobe, Pa. ; he maiTied Lizzie 
Rhodes. Mary married Martin Conuelly and 
(second) George Sayers, both of whom are 
deceased, and she is now living at Lock 
Haven, Pa. William T., who lives at Du 
Bois, Pa., has been with John DuBois for 
thirty-three years, as filer; he married Abbie 
Yoder. Jane married Smith Rudolph, and is 
deceased. James H., chief of police of Du 
Bois, Pa., for nine years, a director of the 
B. R. & P. Railroad Co.. lives at DuBois. Pa. ; 
he married Nannie Weston. Sarah Edith, 
who mai-ried George Shields, of Covode, is 
deceased. Heni-y E. completes the family. 

Henry E. Roney was sent to the local 
schools and was engaged at farm work in his 
young manhood. In 1901 he engaged with 
the J. B. Eberhart Company, of Punxsutaw- 
ney, and continued with that concern for nine 
years, conducting the carpet and furniture 
department. At the expiration of this period 
Mr. Roney came to Trade City and bought the 
general merchandise business owned b.y T. S. 
Neal. and has since continued it with gratify- 
ing results, as he now has a large and con- 
stantl.v increasing business, and carries a fine 
stock of goods. In addition to his pi'ivate busi- 
ness interests Mr. Roney discharges the duties 
of postmaster at Trade City and is an efficient 
official. He is a member of the Knights of 
Malta at Punxsutawney and the Royal Ar- 
canum of the same place. The First English 
Lutheran Church of Trade City holds his 



membership, and he not only teaches a Sun- 
day school class, but is interested in church 
work. 

On Dec. 29, 1894, Mr. Roney was married 
to Anna M. Martin, of Trade City, a daugh- 
ter of Philip J. and Catherine Martin, the 
former of whom is deceased, but the latter 
survives, living on the old homestead south of 
Trade City. Mr. and I\Irs. Ronev have four 
children : Millie, Effie, Ellsworth and Myrtle. 
Mr. Ronej' is admittedly one of the leading 
men of Trade City, and his position has been 
fairly won through faithful service and hon- 
orable methods. 

T. D. STEPHENS, M. D., of Penn Run, 
Indiana county, is a native of that place, 
born Aug. 4, 1869, son of John and Mary 
Jane (Lockard) Stephens. His grandfather, 
Thomas Stephens, was a farmer at Penn Run, 
which is in Cherryhill township, and his wife 
was a member of the McPheeters family of 
that place. The Stephens and Lockard fam- 
ilies are both of Scotch-Irish extraction. 

John and Mary Jane (Lockard) Stephens- 
were farming people of Penn Run. They had 
a family of five children, two sons and three 
daughters, namely: Emma, who is the wife 
of Frank Moorhead, of Indiana. Pa. ; Jlar- 
garet, wife of George Lowman, of Penn Run ; 
Almira, wife of Johnson Moorhead. of Cherry- 
hill township ; T. D. ; and Shadwick or Chad- 
wick, who died in infancy. Mrs. Mary Jane 
(Lockard) Stephens had relatives who en- 
tered the service during the Civil war and 
died while in the anny. 

T. D. Stephens began his education in the 
local public schools, later attending summer 
normal at Greenville, Indiana covinty, and 
the Ohio Wesleyan Univei-sity, at Delaware, 
Ohio. He studied medicine at the University 
of Pittsburg, receiving his degree of ;\I. D. 
in ;\Iarch, 1895. Dr. Stephens is one of the 
most active physicians in Indiana county. He 
is so well and favorably known as a physician 
that his services are sought by many outside 
his own territory. He is at present a member 
of the Indiana County ;\Iedical Examination 
Board. 

Dr. Stephens is active not only in his pro- 
fession, but equally so in all movements that 
are for the best interests of the community in 
which he lives. For yeai-s he has taken an 
active part in politics. He is a Republican, 
and has always stood for clean politics. He 
is an energetic worker in the Harmony Pres- 
byterian Church, of which he is a member. 
" While taking the teachers' training course 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



prescribed by the State Dr. Stephens was the 
teacher of the class, and passed his examina- 
tions with a perfect grade. At present he is 
a trustee of the Greenville Select School. 
He has always upheld the cause of education. 
He displayed his ability as pupil and teacher 
in the public schools. As a supporter of the 
select schools of his own town he cannot he 
too highly spoken of. The large attendance 
of the Greenville school for the last fifteen 
years is due in a great measure to his efforts. 
He not only solicits students for the school, 
but gives them medical attention free of 
charge while they are students there. Tlie 
writer remembers that during an epidemic of 
measles all the studeuts who were afflicted re- 
ceived medical aid from him gratis. He is 
unselfish and extremely liberal, always ready 
to assist students in their games, or in any- 
thing that may bring sunshine into their lives. 

The Doctor has a wide circle of i^atients 
and is highly esteemed by all with whom he 
comes in contact, whether in his professional 
capacitj' or any of the other relations of life, 
being recognized as a man of character and 
worth, and an honorable representative of the 
respected name he bears. 

On June 27, 1895, Dr. Stephens was mar- 
ried to Martha Jane Simpson, daughter of 
Nathan Simpson, of Indiana. Dr. and Mrs. 
Stephens have two children : Roy S., born 
June 4, 1899, and Drew H., lioni March 2, 
1901. 

JOHN HARBISON, late of Armstrong 
township. Indiana county, was a member of 
one of the oldest pioneer families of that 
section, and was born on Blacklegs creek, in 
Young township, in the twenties, son of 
Joseph Harbison and grandson of Francis 
Harbison. It is supposed the latter 's father 
was stolen from the coast of England and 
brought to America as a deckhand, presum- 
ably impressed into service. He escaped 
from the ship on which he was held at either 
New York or Philadelphia. 

The Harbison family is supposedly of 
Scotch-Irish extraction, and Francis Harbi- 
son, who founded the branch living in Indi- 
ana county, was a native of Pennsylvania, 
born near Philadelphia. During the memor- 
able struggle of the Colonies for independ- 
ence he served as a soldier, and was taken 
prisoner. In 1798 he came to western Penn- 
sylvania, crossing the Allegheny mountains 
and settling with his family in what is now 
Young township, Indiana county, where he 



was among the early pioneers who opened up 
this region. His land was south of West 
Lebanon, where the station is now located, 
and he became the owner of a large body, 
having over one thousand acres, then in its 
primitive condition. He built a house of 
round logs, and also a log barn, and set him- 
self to work to clear his land and prepare it 
for cultivation. He spent the remainder of 
his life there, dying on his farm in 1823. at 
the age of sixty-five years, and is buried in 
the Ebenezer Church cemetery in Conemaugh 
township. He was a Presbyterian in relig- 
ious connection. His wife, Catherine (Hart), 
lived to the advanced age of ninety years, 
dying in 1849, and is also buried in the Eben- 
ezer Church cemeteiy. They had children as 
follows : Joseph, mentioned below ; Robert, 
born in 1785, who married Mary Millen, and 
died in 1855; Mary, who married Thomas 
Cunningham; Jane, who married James Sw- 
ing; Anna; William, who married Sarah 
Hutchinson; Sarah, who married William 
McNeil; and Matthew, who married Mary 
Heney. 

Joseph Harbison, eldest son of Francis and 
Catherine (Hart) Harbison, came with his 
parents to Young township and became one 
of the leading agriculturists of his day in 
that vicinity. He acquired a tract of several 
hundred acres. His first dwelling was con- 
structed of logs, and he later erected a frame 
house and barn, also making many other im- 
provements on his property, where he spent 
his life. The frame residence which he built 
there in the latter forties is still standing and 
is in an excellent state of preservation. Mr. 
Harbison died on his place and was buried in 
West Lebanon cemetery. He was a strong 
antislavery man, a Whig and Republican in 
political sentiment, and served as justice of 
the peace. A prominent member of the Pres- 
byterian Church, he served as elder of the 
church at West Lebanon, which he helped to 
organize; he w,as originally a member of the 
church at Eldersridge. He was a man of high 
Christian character, devoted to his home, his 
family and the best interests of the com- 
munity, and was a desirable citizen in every 
sense of the term. His wife, Rebecca 
(Ewing), was a daughter of John and Sarah 
(Moore) Ewing and a sister of Alexander 
Ewing. one of her nephews being the late 
Rev. T. R. Ewing. Mrs. Harbison died on 
the farm and was interred in the West Leb- 
anon cemetery. She was a member of the 



864 



HISTOEY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Presbj'terian Church. Eight children were 
born to Joseph and Rebecca (Ewing) Har- 
bison: Anna, wife of Silas Fulton; Sarah, 
wife of Joseph Cunningham; William, boi'n 
in 1814, who died March 6, 1850 ; Mary, wife 
of William Cooper, residing at Slippery 
Eock, Butler Co., Pa. ; Francis, who married 
Parmelia Cooper, and resided in Young 
township ; Catherine, who died unmaiTied ; 
John, who married Elizabeth Beatty; and 
Jane, who died unmarried. 

John Harbison attended common school in 
Young township, and became familiar with 
farm work at home, assisting Iris parents. 
When a young man he bought a threshing 
machine and commenced to work at thresh- 
ing and baling all over this section, a line of 
work which he continued to carrj^ on all his 
life. He also became interested in farming on 
his own account, in 1862 moving to Armstrong 
township and settling on the Beatty farm of 
124 acres, which he subsequently bought from 
the Beatty heirs, establishing his permanent 
home upon this tract. His widow still resides 
there, cultivating the laud with the assistance 
of hired help. She also owns the coal rights. 
j\Ir. Harbison was one of the most i-espected 
citizens of his neighborhood, where by a long 
Ufe of industry and usefulness he had gained 
the esteem of all who knew him. He died 
in May, 1896, aged seventy-two years, and is 
buried in the cemetery of the Curry Run 
Presbyterian Church in Armstrong township. 
He was a member of that church. 

Mr. Harbison married Elizabeth Beatty, 
who was born Dec. 7. 1830. in Armstrong 
township, daughter of Robert and Nancy 
(Borland) Beatty, and though now eighty- 
two years of age is in possession of all her 
faculties, active mentally and physically. 
She is regarded by all her neighbors as a 
woman of high character and intelligence. 
Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Harbison: Maria M., deceased, who was the 
wife of Harry McClellan; Mary A., deceased; 
R. Edwin, deceased, who was a school teacher 
in Armstrong township ; and Martha J., the 
only survivor of the family. The last named 
attended common school in Armstrong to\\Ti- 
ship and later went to select schools at Park- 
wood and Shelocta, and to Grove City College. 
After teaching five terms in Armstrong town- 
ship and for a time in the liigh school at Salts- 
burg she went back to Grove City College for 
another term's study, and she has since been 
teaching eighth grade in the McNair school at 



Wilkinsburg, Pa., where .she has now been 
engaged for eight years. She has been very 
successful, and is a valued worker. 

HARRY PATTON DOWLER, superin- 
tendent of the Penn-]Mary Coal Company, at 
Heilwood, Indiana Co., Pa., is a native of 
Clearfield count}^, this State, bom June 5, 
1869, a son of Capt. James and Cornelia 
(Patton) Dowler. 

Capt. James Dowler was bom in Ireland, 
and as a lad was taken to England by his 
father, a guardsman in the British Resei-ves. 
On coming to the United States, Capt. James 
Dowler first located in New York City, where 
he remained for two years, at the end of that 
time coming to Clearfield county, Pa., where 
he was engaged in lumbering and farming 
up to the time of his death, in 1904. He 
married Cornelia Patton, who was bom in 
Center county, Pa., and she died in 1907, 
the mother of ten children, as follows: Wil- 
liam, now deceased, who was a physician 
and surgeon of Patton, Pa. ; Susanna, wife 
of James Martin, living on the old homestead 
in Clearfield county; John, residing at Burn- 
side, Clearfield county; Elizabeth, also a resi- 
dent of Burnside; James, who lives in West 
Virginia ; Josephine, wife of Ellery Harts- ' 
horn, of Texas; Harry Patton; and three 
who are deceased. 

John Patton. maternal gi-andfather of 
Harry Patton Dowler, was a native of Cen- 
ter county. Pa., where he owned considerable 
laud. His father was a member of Gen- 
eral Washington's bodyguard during tlie 
war of the Revolution, being colonel of t!ie 
ICth Additional Continental Regiment, and 
subsec|uently becoming ma.ior general of a 
division of the State militia. He had charge 
of the defenses of Philadelphia during the 
Revolution, and was one of the most patri- 
otic merchants of that city, where he died 
in the year 1804. His wife. Susan (Antes). 
was a daughter of Philip Antes, an early 
settler of Pennsylvania and a well-known 
justice of his day. 

The early education of Harry Patton Dow- 
ler was oiitained in the piiblie schools of 
Clearfield county, and in 1894 he was gradu- 
ated from the Pennsylvania State College in 
mining engineering, subsequently accepting 
a position with the Mitchell Coal Company, 
at Tyrone, Pa., where he remained four 
years. During this time, in 1898, he served 
as first lieutenant in the State Cavalry, 2d 
Sheridan Troop. From 1899 to 1900 he was 
engaged in coal operations at Glen Campbell, 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



865 



aud then Aveut to Pittsburg, where he started 
dealing in coal and timber lands, and was so 
employed until 1906, in the spring of which 
year he accepted his present position as su- 
perintendent of the Penn-Mary Coal Com- 
pany. j\Ir. Dowler is also president of the 
Lasoya Oil Company, of Oklahoma, and a 
director of the First National Bank of Glen 
Campbell. He is known as a capable busi- 
ness man, and one who is thoroughly con- 
versant with the mining industry. He be- 
longs to the Coal Mining Institute of Amer- 
ica, and to the Engineers' Society of West- 
ern Pennsylvania, and also to the American 
Institute of Mining Engineers. 

In 1S98 Mr. Dowler was married to Erae- 
liue Patchin, who was born in Clearfield 
county. Pa., daughter of Aaron W. and 
Elizabeth (Barrett) Patchin. J\Ir. Patchin, 
who was one of the most extensive lumber- 
men on the Susquehanna river, died in 1898, 
while his widow, a native of England, still 
lives on the old family homestead. Three 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Dowler: Aaron P., eleven years old; Eliza- 
beth Jane, who is seven; and Mary Wini- 
fred, aged four years. 

Mr. Dowler has interested himself closely 
with fraternal matters and is especially 
prominent in Masonry, holding membership in 
Tyrone Blue Lodge and Chapter, Mountain 
Commandery. K. T., of Altoona, Williams- 
port Consistory (thirty-second degree), and 
Syria Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., of Pitts- 
l3urg. He also belongs to Bumside Lodge 
of Odd Fellows and to the B. P. 0. Elks 
lodge at Indiana. With Mrs. Dowler and 
their children he attends the Presbyterian 
Church of Heilwood. 

ALVIN TAYLOR McNUTT. proprietor of 
the Orchard Grove farm of Brushvalley town- 
ship, which has been in the McNutt family 
for five generations, is one of the progressive 
farmers of that section of Indiana county. 
He was born Nov. 17, 1854, on the farm where 
lie now makes his home. 

The ]McNutt family is of Scotch-Irish 
extraction, tlie founder of the Indiana county 
branch being -Tames McNutt. who was a native 
of Ireland, and came to this country at an 
early date. He settled in Bnishvalley town- 
ship, Indiana county, which was then a wil- 
derness. Here he took up a tract of 500 
acres, which later was patented by his son 
John. Mr. AIcNutt here erected a log house, 
and by hard labor hewed out a home for him- 
self in the wilderness, settling down to farm- 



ing. He continued to make his home there 
the rest of his life. A part of his farm is 
now owned by Mr. John G. McCrory, the 
well-known owner of a chain of five and ten 
cent stores. Mr. McNutt died on the farm 
and was buried in what is known as Matters 
graveyard, near the homestead. In religious 
belief he was a Methodist. 

Mr. McNutt married Sally Amatage, who 
was also a native of Ireland, and they became 
the parents of twelve children, viz. : John ; 
Joseph ; Wesley ; James ; Henry, who settled 
in Ohio; Asbury, who died young; Robert, 
who settled in New Orleans; Samuel, Nelson 
and William, who all died in infancy ; Miram, 
who married Jesse Hiuer; and Betsey M., 
who died young. 

Joseph McNutt, son of James, was born on 
the old homestead, where he grew to man- 
hood. He learned the trade of blacksmith, 
which he followed during his active life. In 
his earlier years he worked at his trade in 
different sections of the State, but later in 
life he settled down in Bnishvalley township, 
where he erected a shop on a part of his 
father's farm and here followed his trade as 
a general blacksmith for many years. His 
last .years were spent in Johnstown, where 
his death occurred, and he was buried there. 
Air. ilcNutt married in Brushvalley town- 
ship Elizabeth (Betsey) Evans, daughter of 
Hugh Evans, who was a pioneer settler of 
that township. Children as follows came to 
this imion : Mary Ann, who married Robert 
Swarts, of Brushvalley township ; John E. ; 
Hiigh, who went West ; Hannah, who married 
Jacob IMcKay; Sarah, who married James 
Summerville; and Samuel, who resided in 
Boswell, Cambria county. After his first 
wife's death Mr. McNutt was married (sec- 
ond) to Margaret Gebhart, and they had four 
children, Lizzie, Catherine. Jane aud Elmer. 

John Evans McNutt, son of Joseph and 
Elizabeth (Evans) McNutt, was born in 
Brushvalley township, where he was educated. 
He worked at farming from an early age, 
and when he reached manhood settled on the 
farm of his uncle, John McNutt, where the 
remainder of his active life was spent. The 
place is now in the possession of his son, Alvin 
Taylor McNutt, and it is known as Orchard 
Grove farm. He here operated a tract of 100 
acres, engaging in general farming all his 
active life. Upon his retirement Mr. McNutt 
removed to ilechanicsburg, and continued to 
live there until his death, in September, 1891 ; 
he was buried in the Evans cemetery, in 
Brushvalley township. In polities he was a 



866 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



stanch Republican, and he was assessor and 
supei-^'isor of his township. He was a member 
of the M. E. Church and was active in all 
church work. 

Mr. McNutt married Catharine McXutt, 
daughter of John j\IcNutt, who for years was 
a well-known local preacher and exhorter of 
the M. E. Church, and who was the owner and 
patentee of the land taken up by his father 
in Bi-ushvalley township. Mrs. ^IcNutt is 
still living, residing with her grandchildren 
in Center township, near Homer City. She 
is a member of the M. E. Church also. The 
following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
McNutt: (1) Edward, who died at Blairs- 
ville, was a farmer in Burrell township. He 
married Lizzie Younkiu. (2) Alvin Taylor 
is mentioned below. ^ 

Alvin Taylor McNutt received his educa- 
tion in the schools of the township, and grew 
to manhood on the farm where he aided his 
father in the cultivating of the homestead. In 
1889, when his father retired, he took charge 
of the property, then a tract of 100 acres, to 
which he has added 130 acres, being now the 
owner and operator of a tract of 230 acres, 
where he is -engaged in general farming and 
stock raising. He has made extensive im- 
provements on the farm, and is one of the 
most progressive and successful agi-iculturists 
in his part of the county. 

Mr. McNutt married March 4, 1879, Lu- 
cinda Smith, who was born in Allegheny, 
Pa., daughter of John and Amy (Cross) 
Smith. Sirs. McNutt is a member of the 
Evangelical Church. She has always been a 
devoted, and affectionate mother, and her 
husband has always had in her a loving help- 
mate. Seven children have been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. McNutt, viz.: (1) Alvin Gilford 
died at the age of nine years. (2) Etta 
Maude, born July 17, 1881, married Charles 
Ross, and has four children, Cora Bela, War- 
den Melvin, "Wilda Adeline and Orlene 
Retula. (3) One child died in infancy. (4) 
George Taylor, born ]\Iarch 2, 1884. was edu- 
cated in the public schools and worked at 
home with his parents until 1911, when he 
went to Alberta, Canada, and he is now a 
ranchman in ]\rontana. He is affiliated with 
the I. 0. 0. F. (5) Annie Catharine, born 
Sept. 21, 1890, was educated in the public 
schools and the summer normal school taught 
by Prof. J. T. Stewart. She resides at home. 
(6) John Smith, born Oct. 16, 1891, received 
his early education in the public schools 
of Brushvalley township, later stud.viug at 
Greenville, Pa., under Professor "Weaver, and 



at Mechanicsburg, Pa., under Prof. C. A. 
Campbell. He taught school for two years 
in Brushvalley and Butfington townships, and 
is now a student at the Illinois Holiness Uni- 
versity at OUvet, Illinois, preparing himseK 
for the life of a missionary. (7) Robert 
Vivian, born Sept. 16. 1897, was also edu- 
cated in the public schools of Brushvalley 
township, and resides at home. 

Mr. Alvin T. McXutt is a Republican in 
politics. He is a stanch supporter of the 
principles of Colonel Roosevelt, and one of 
his most ardent admirers. He has been di- 
rector of the public schools of his township 
for one term. 

GEORGE S. GRIFFITH, a prosperous 
farmer and stock raiser of his section of Indi- 
ana county, was born in South Mahonins: 
township Feb. 22, 1861, son of David Griffith. 

Evan Griffith, a native of South Wales, 
brought his family to America in 1840, in a 
sailing vessel. Coming to Pennsylvania, they 
first settled in Rayne township, ' Indiana 
county, and followed farming, but later the 
parents went to Cambria county, where they 
rounded out their lives, owning, the farm on 
which they died. Evan Griffith and his wife 
Mary had these children : Evan, who settled 
in California; John, who settled in Illinois; 
Griffith, who settled in Cambria county; 
Lewis, who died young : Daniel, who settled in 
Conemaugh township; David, who settled in 
Indiana county; Mary, who died in Cambria 
countj' ; Sarah, who died in Cambria county ; 
Margaret, who married Alexander St. Clair, 
and lived in Illinois; Winnie, who married 
Daniel Thomas, and lived in Johnstown; 
Elizabeth, who lived in Cambria count.v; and 
a son who died in infancy, unnamed. 

David Griffith was bom in 1821, in South 
Wales, and came with his father to America 
when about twenty years old. After a year 
spent in Rayne township, Indiana county, he 
went to East ilahoning township, where he 
farmed until 1850, and then went to West 
Mahoning township and bought the farm now 
owned by his sou Evan. It contained 130 
acres ancl he improved it to a considerable ex- 
tent before his death upon it, in 1878, when 
he was fifty-seven years old. He is buried in 
the Baptist Church cemetery in South Ma- 
honing township. He was a good man, fol- 
lowing out the Golden Rule in his evervday 
life. 

David Griffith married Sarah Kimple, who 
was born in Delaware county, N. J., in 1831, 
daughter of John and I\Ian- (Sigler) Kimple, 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



and granddaughter of Philip Sigler, who was 
a Revolutionary soldier. She died on the 
homestead in 1885 and is buried in the same 
cemetery as her husband. The children of 
this excellent couple were : Evan W., who is 
a farmer of West Mahoning township, mar- 
ried Flora Spencer; John K., who resides in 
Kansas, married Margaret M. Schall ; George 
L. died j'oung; Mary, who married Scott 
Fitzgerald, resides in Kansas City; Sarah L., 
who married James Hazelett, is deceased; 
George S. is mentioned below; Margaret 
Adessa is unmarried; Amanda Emma is the 
widow of William Carahan, and resides in 
Chicago; Annie Maria is a physiciaij; Philip 
S. lives in Nebraska ; Jennie V. married Wil- 
liam McKinnev, of Goodland, Kansas. 

George S. Griffith, son of David Griffith, 
attended the district schools, and assisted with 
the work on the homestead until he was 
twenty-two years old. He then bought fifty 
acres of the Crawford farm, paying down 
$300, and giving notes for the remaining 
$2,300. For a time he had to economize 
closely to clear off this debt, but he succeeded 
and added forty acres more, which farm was 
known as the Allison pi'operty. At present 
he operates ninety acres. In addition he owns 
104 acres formerly known as the Capt. Peter 
Spencer farm, in South Mahoning township, 
and a five-acre tract in Plumville, which has 
been built upon. His land is devoted to gen- 
eral farming and stock raising, and he has 
also dealt in cattle, horses and sheep. Mr. 
Griffith made many improvements on his barn, 
which was struck by lightning in 1899, after 
which he rebuilt it. 

A Republican, he served as assessor for 
three years and constable for three years. He 
was a candidate for county treasurer of Indi- 
ana county in 1911, but after making a hard 
fight lost the nomination by a few votes. He 
is a member of the Baptist Church, and has 
many friends in that connection as he has 
elsewhere, his genial, pleasant personality 
winning them for him. 

In 1881 Mr. Griffith married Annie Kerr, 
who was born in West Mahoning township, 
daughter of William Kerr, and died ia 1900 ; 
she is buried in the Baptist Church cemetery 
in South Mahoning township. Mr. and Mrs. 
Griffith had these children : Charles William 
is a farmer of East Mahoning township ; 
Sarah is deceased; Pearl is a widow and re- 
sides at home; Bert was a fii-eman and was 
killed on the Buffalo & Susquehanna railroad ; 
David K. resides at Cleveland, Ohio; an in- 
fant daughter died unnamed. Mr. Griffith 



married, for his second wife, Thea Bell Neil, 
who was bom in South Mahoning township, 
a daughter of Julin and Annie (Orr) Neil. 
Mrs. Griffith was taken to Missouri by her 
parents when five years old, and was there 
reared to maturity. She is a woman of in- 
telligence and admirable character. She and 
Mr. Griffith have had two children: Irene, 
Avho died young; and George Sylvester, Jr. 
Mrs. Griffith is a consistent member of the 
Baptist Church. 

Mr. Griffith has always shown a public- 
spirited interest in local institutions, believ- 
ing in encouraging them. At one time he 
gave his support to the First National Bank 
of Plumville as a director, his name lending 
strength to this concern. His career has been 
marked by hard, unremitting work, but his 
efforts have met with a commensurate reward, 
and his standing in the community is con- 
sistently high. 

JOHN TAYLOR BELL has been asso- 
ciated with the business life of the bor- 
ough of Indiana dui-ing the greater part 
of his residence there and is a citizen 
thoroughly interested in the general welfare, 
as he has shown practically in his more 
than twenty-five years of service as member 
of the board of school directors. He is one 
of the foremost men of Indiana county, 
and the fact that he has attained his honor- 
able and substantial position through his 
own efforts make his success the more note- 
worthy. He belongs to a family whose his- 
tory in this part of Pennsylvania begins in 
pioneer days, and whose members have been 
typical representatives of the hardy, thrifty 
Scotch-Irish race to which they belong. The 
State has this element to thank for many of 
its most desirable citizens. Combining intel- 
lectual vigor and strong moral qualities with 
physical sturdiness, they faced the hardships 
of the early days courageously, made the most 
of their opportunities, inaugurated move- 
ments for the advancement of the general good 
as soon as prosperity relieved them from the 
pressure of unremitting devotion to their im- 
mediate needs, and helped to establish a civil- 
ization which reflects credit on all who have 
taken part in its accomplishment. Members 
of the family have intermarried with the Mc- 
Garas, Speedys, McKees, Johnstons, Davises 
and Hughes, and other worthy and respected 
families, all of Avhom are well represented at 
the Bell reunions held from time to time, a 
family association having been organized some 
years ago. The Bells as a rule are Presby- 



868 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



terians in religious eounection, though there 
are many of the Methodist and Baptist per- 
suasion among them. 

It seeiiis likely that the home of the Bells 
was originally in Scotland, whence they 
spread into Ireland, England and Wales, and 
thence to America, "possibly ahead of the 
'Mayflower,' " according to one member of 
the family. However, Robert Bell was born 
in 1736 near Belfast, in the north of Ireland, 
and came to this country with two brothers, 
landing at Philadelphia. One of the brothers 
went South, and one remained in eastern 
Pennsylvania, Robert going first to Center 
county. Pa., and thence to Westmoreland 
county, where he made a settlement near Se- 
wickley. Among his descendants are the Bells 
of Kentucky, his son Joseph Bell, who was 
born in Westmoreland county. July 17, 1765, 
dying in Kentuckj% January 16, 1803. Robert 
Bell died June 11, 1826, long surviving his 
wife, Jane, who died April 3, 1791. Their 
children were: (1) Joseph, born July 17, 
1765, died in Kentucky January 16, 1803. 
(2) James was born December 10, 1766. (3) 
Elizabeth, born in February, 1768, never mar- 
ried. (4) John, born January 28, 1770, is 
mentioned below. (5) Samuel, born Febru- 
ary 10, 1773, died June 9, 1856, at the Bell 
homestead near Chambersville, Indiana 
county. He was "squire" for over thirty 
years" and surveyov for the Holland Land 
Company of Philadelphia, and his surveying 
instruments, bearing his initials, "S. B.," 
were owned by some one near-Newville, In- 
diana county, Pa., some years ago. He moved 
from Sewickley to six or seven miles southwest 
of Greensburg, thence to near Saltsburg, 
where he lived until his removal to ilcKees 
Mill in 1807. From there in 1814 he moved 
to Chambersville, where he bought a large 
tract of land known as "the Steward 's lands," 
belonging to some English heirs, sold at com- 
missioners' sale for taxes, for $17.53, in 1811. 
Samuel Bell married Jane Welsh, sister of his 
brother John's wife. (6) William, born Feb- 
ruary 10, 1776, died in Kentucky, where he 
left a family, two of whom, AVilliam and John, 
became practicing physicians in Louisville, 
while another, James, made his home near 
there. (7) :Margaret, born in February, 1778, 
married James McLaughlin, of Indiana 
county. (8) Jane married Archie Fleming, 
of near Greensburg, and their descendants 
are found in Ohio and Illinois. 

John Bell, son of Robert, was the great- 
grandfather of John Taylor Bell. He was 
born January 28, 1770, in Virginia, and was 



but an infant when his father moved to Cum- 
berland county, this State, and soon after to 
Sewickley settlement in Westmoreland county, 
where he gi-ew up. One of the interesting ex- 
periences of his young manhood was his part 
in the overthrow of the Whiskey Insurrection, 
and he remembered perfectly incidents con- 
nected with the march of the forces through 
this region for its suppression. He was mar- 
ried there to Elizabeth Welsh, and about 1800 
moved to the vicinity of what is now the bor- 
ough of Indiana. He was the first constable 
elected in Indiana county after its formation, 
in 1806, but in 1809 he moved farther into 
the wilderness, in May of that year settling 
upon the farm near Perrysville, now Hamil- 
ton, in Jefferson county, about one mile north 
of Big ilahouing creek, where he passed the 
remainder of his life, dying there ilay 18, 
1855, in his eighty-sixth year. This was the 
first settlement made north of that creek in 
Jefferson county. The country for miles 
around was a wilderness without human habi- 
tation, his only neighbors until 1812 being 
nine miles distant, and the onlj^ road in that 
part of the county four miles away. John 
Bell was "a true specimen of the pioneer 
who with ax and rifle subdued the forests and 
opened the waj- for civilization, and combined 
the manly virtues and striking traits which 
distinguished that class of men. now almost 
extinct," their sti-ongly marked peculiarities 
being known more by tradition than observa- 
tion to the present generation. "xVs may be 
inferred, the silence of the forest was as often 
bfoken by the crack of Squire Bell's rifle as 
by the stroke of his ax. In those days clear- 
ing land and hunting game were employments 
which claimed an equal share of the pioneer's 
attractions. Indeed, for a long time after he 
settled there, the rifle was almost his only 
means of subsistence, for the heavy and 
thickly grown timber of that region was not 
easily cleared off. And thus in the simple 
but rugged employments of the forest passed 
many of his years. Of his hunting exploits 
no better description can be given than to 
state that during his residence in Jefferson 
county he killed two panthei's, ninety-three 
wolves, three hundred and six bears and over 
eight hundred deer. Incredible as this state- 
ment may appear to the degenerate hunters of 
the present day, none who knew John Bell will 
doubt its truth ; for it was taken from his lips 
by a gentleman whose taste in hunting and 
whose care and industry as a collector of 
statistics are well known. But he was not a 
hunter merely, for in addition to his duties on 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



869 



the farm he fulfilled all the duties of a citizen. 
In 1818 Governor Findlay appointed him jus- 
tice of the peace, an office which he held for 
twenty-five years with credit and usefulness. 

"We have said that John Bell was a repre- 
sentative of the early American character as 
developed in pioneer life ; but he was more a 
type of its virtues than of its faults. Brave 
and enterprising, he avoided neither exposure 
nor fatigue and cheerfully underwent labors 
from which most men would shrink, and, 
familiar with the dangers of forest, he knew 
no fear. But his most striking characteristics 
were love for truth and sterling honesty dis- 
played alike in his own business and in his in- 
tercourse with others. The common fault of 
professing what we do not feel he did not 
possess. He called no man friend whom he 
did not respect; his sturdy independence of 
character disdained to conceal any opinions 
he might have of others, either from them- 
selves or from the world. But for those who 
possessed his friendship, no personal incon- 
venience or sacrifice was too gi-eat. For 
twenty-five years or more his hospitable home 
was the resting place of the Indiana bar in 
their periodical pilgrimage to Brookville, and 
so long at least as its members live his simple, 
manly virtues will be appreciated and his 
memory kindly cherished. ' ' He died May 19, 
1855, in his eighty-sixth year. (Quotations 
from an article published in the Punxsutaw- 
ney Nei/}s as being of interest in connection 
with the meeting of the Bells at the residence 
of John H. Brown, near Marchand, Indiana 
county, in 1893.) 

The proverbial thriftiness of the Bells in 
providing for their wants in the face of diffi- 
culties, and their hard-working disposition, 
is dwelt upon by a member of the family in 
an article prepared for one of the reunions. 
"The Bells are noted for the providence of 
the men and the skill and economy of the 
woman in 'laying up' an abundance of the 
good things of life." Speaking of the brothers 
Squire Samuel and Squire John, he says: 
"Their homely larders were always well 
stocked with a plentiful supply of game, fish, 
etc., including deer, bear, wild turkey, wild 
pork, wild honey, nuts and berries. Nowhere 
I have ever been have I seen any people more 
industrious in providing for winter than the 
people of western Pennsylvania, * * * 
and I am sure none more than the Bells. 
* * * The Bells were "Whigs and Demo- 
crats, and very 'sot' in their religious and 
political views, but I am inclined to judge 
that there were more Democrats and Presby- 



terians than anything else. * * « Yet, 
whether Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists 
or what denomination, they were generally 
true to their convictions and consistent in 
their lives." 

Squire John Bell married Elizabeth Welsh, 
of Sewickley, Pa. By this marriage there 
were thi-ee children, James, Jane and Joseph. 
Of these, James married Hannah Jordan and 
had nine children, Robert, James Welsh, Jo- 
seph, John, William, JIary (married to Alex. 
Hughes), Eliza (married to Samuel Swisher), , 
Margaret (married to Job Brown) and Kate 
(married to Daniel North). Jane married 
David Postlewaite and had ten children, John 
B., James M., Joseph Warren, David Minor, 
Thomas J., Benjamin F., William P., Emily 
Jane, Sarah and Mary. His first wife having 
died. Squire Bell later married Jane Potter, 
by whom he had one daughter, named Rachel, 
who married Samuel Weaver, and now resides 
at Valier, Jefferson Co., Pennsylvania. 

Joseph Bell, son of John Bell by the first 
wife, was born on the old homestead near 
Perrysville in January, 1796, and died June 
19, 1850. aged fifty-four years. In 1825 he 
married Sarah McKee, who died in 1833, leav- 
ing two sons, Hugh McKee and Frank Welsh. 
He afterward married Rachel Backman, by 
whom he had three daughters: Jane, de- 
ceased, wife of Miller ^Means, of Punxsutaw- 
ney. Pa. ; Elizabeth, also deceased, wife of 
William McGee, and Mary E., widow of W. P., 
Morris of Jefferson county. 

Frank Welsh Bell, tlie younger son of 
Joseph Bell, married Sarah Robinson, of Jef- 
ferson county, and they had five children: 
Hattie is the wife of Dr. Armstrong and lives 
in Kane, Pa. ; Mattie, IMinnie, ]\Iack and 
Charles, and both parents, are deceased. 

Hugh McKee Bell, the elder son of Joseph 
Bell, was born August 15, 1826, and was a 
farmer in Jefiierson county, living on the old 
homestead. On July 22, 1852. he was married 
to Eleanor Martin, and seven children were 
born to this couple : John Taylor married 
Elizabeth Todd, of Indiana, now deceased, 
and still lives in Indiana ; Joseph C. married 
Annie Cook, of Iowa, and is now deceased ; 
George R. married Hattie McGee and prac- 
tices dentistry in Punxsutawney ; Frank 
Welsh married ilary Smitten and now lives 
in Oregon ; Sarah Elizabeth married B. E. 
Carrier, of near Brookville, Pa., and now lives 
near Salem, Oregon ; William M. and Lot are 
deceased. The father died on the old home- 
stead March 23, 1911, and the mother just 
eleven days later, on April 3. They were 



870 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



members of the M. E. Churoli, which he had 
served in an official capacity for many years. 

John Taylor Bell was born September 16, 
1853, at Frostburg. Jefferson county, and ob- 
tained his early education in the public schools 
of his native county. Later he attended the 
normal school at Indiana, Pa., and ]\Iount 
Union College, at Alliance, Ohio, after which 
he read law. with Hon. S. ]\I. Clark and J. N. 
Banks, both of Indiana, ileantime he had 
commenced teaching, when but sixteen years 
old, his first experience being at what is now 
known as the Pickering Run school, in East 
Mahoning township, Indiana county. He re- 
mained thei'e one year, and was subsequently 
engaged in different parts of Indiana county 
for ten years, during the summer teaching 
in a school for teachers at Plumville. When 
he came to Indiana he was assistant to the 
principal, and followed his profession in the 
borough for three years, continuing to teach 
while he was reading law. He was very suc- 
cessful as an educator, and became well known 
throughout the county as an ardent friend of 
education. In 1886 Mr. Bell was admitted to 
the bar in Indiana county, and for two years 
practiced his profession, but owing to poor 
health decided to give up legal work, and has 
since devoted himself to general business pur- 
suits. He has been engaged principally as a 
salesman for school books, first for Porter & 
Coates, of Philadelphia, later with the Werner 
Company, of Akron, Ohio, and more recently 
with the American Book Company, of New 
York. He is one of the directors of the In- 
diana Savings & Trust Company, and his 
standing in commercial and financial circles 
is a credit to his abilitj' and honorable 
standards. As previously stated, ]\Ir. Bell has 
been a member of the school board of In- 
diana for over twenty-five years, and has 
given intelligent as well as faithful service to 
the community in that connection. He is a 
member of the IL E. Churcli. and in social 
connection is a ^Mason, belonging to Indiana 
Lodge, No. 313, F. & A. U.. to the Chapter, 
Royal Arch :Ma.sons, at Pittsburg, and Pitts- 
burg Lodge of Perfection. 

On September 15. 1885, Mr. Bell was mar- 
ried to Elizabeth Todd, daughter of Col. Wil- 
liam A. Todd, of Indiana, and they had two 
children : Edna T., who is attending Ilollins 
College, at Hollins, Va.. and Hugh T., a stu- 
dent at the Universitv of Jlichigan. at Ann 
Arbor. .Mrs. Bell died June 4, 1004. 

JAMES S. McELTIOES. hm^x connected 
with the Indiana Woolen ^Mills Company, 



which has its plant in the borough of Indiana, 
has been one of the energetic citizens who have 
kept the business spirit in that place up to 
the modern standard, adding to the value of 
every other industry in the place by the intel- 
ligent management of his own. He was born 
in Indiana county April 4, 1847. 

Thomas McElhoes, his great-grandfather, 
was born in Scotland, of Scotch parents, and 
came to the United States in company with 
two of his brothers, settling in the Cumber- 
land valley, in Pennsylvania, at an early day. 
He followed farming. 

John McElhoes, son of Thomas, was born 
in Cumberland county, Pa., near Carlisle, 
and learned the trade of miller, which he fol- 
lowed in connection with farming. When 
comparatively a young man he settled in 
Indiana county, where he was similarly en- 
gaged. He died in 1856. 

Isaiah McElhoes, son of John, was born 
and reared in Indiana county, receiving such 
educational advantages as the schools of his 
time afforded. Like his father he became a 
farmer and miller, and was thus engaged for j 
some years, later becoming interested in the I 

manufacture of wool, for which he established I 

a mill on Pine run which is supposed to have 
been the first woolen mill in Indiana county. 
He was an enterprising business man, and the 
undertaking prospered. He married Isabella 
Kinter, and they had a family of four chil- 
dren: Jane, wife of George Collins; John 
K. ; James S. ; and Bell, wife of James Allen. 
The mother died in 1874. the father surviv- 
ing her many years, until 1894. 

James S. McElhoes was educated in the I 

public schools of the home locality. AVhen I 

(juite young he began work in his father's " 

woolen mill on Pine run, remaining there 
until 1890. The experience he gained under 
his father's careful oversight has proved in- 
valuable to him in his subsequent career. 
When the old mill at Pine run was destroyed 
b.y fire, in 1890, he removed to Indiana bor- 
ough, forming a partnership with John A. 
Finley for the manufacture of woolen goods, 
which they carried on under the firm name 
of IMcElhoes & Finley. This firm did busi- 
ness until 1902. when their establishment was 
bui-ned out. and ^Ii*. McElhoes then organized 
the present concern, which does business under 
the name of Indiana Woolen ]Mills Company. 
It was incorporated with a capital stock of 
^35.000, and at the beginning Mr. :\[cElhoes 
became superintendent, filling that position 
for several years. He then became secretary, 
and in every capacity has given the utmost 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 871 

satisfaction to all concerned. The company Ellen Harrison and (second) Sarah Miller; 
makes a specialty of woolen blankets, and the Joseph, married Nancy ilabon ; Mary, mar- 
business is thriving and shows steady growth, ried Archibald Jamison ; Nancy, married Ed- 
There are a number of live concerns in the ward Turner; Hannah, married Samuel K. 
borough which contribute steadily to its pros- Lockhart : Margaret, married James Mabon. 
perity, and the Indiana Woolen Mills Com- Isaac Lydick, son of Patrick Lydick, was 
pany is numbered among them. As a citizen born in 1800, in what was then Green (now 
]\Ir. MeElhoes enjoys the highest standing. Rayne) township, and was educated in the 
He is a prominent member of the Presby- schools of his period, conducted upon the sub- 
terian Church, which he has served as elder, scription plan, as there were no public schools 
and he has also been Sunday school superin- in those early days. He worked on the farm 
tendent. from early boyhood until he reached his ma- 
in 1897 Mr. JIcElhoes married Orpha jority, when he located in South ilahoning 
Rupert, daughter of George Rupert. They township on 150 acreS, which land he devel- 
have two children, George and Marion, oped into a valuable property. In addition 
George is still a student at college, and he to farming he built and operated the first 
also has the management of the home farm, gristmill in that section, now known as the 
Mr. MeElhoes now makes his home on a farm Rossmoyne, and kept a country store. His 
in Rayne township (Home post office), near remaining years were spent there, and he died 
Kelleysburg, to which he removed from In- in 1838, when still in the prime of life. His 
diana, some months ago. remains were interred in Gilgal cemetery. He 

was a Baptist in religious belief, and a "Whig 

JOSEPH LYDICK, late of South Mahon- politically, 
ing township, was a veteran of the Civil war. The first wife of Isaac Lydick was Ann 

and one of the oldest residents of his locality. Turner, and his second marriage was to Eliza 

He was born in West Mahoning township Sutor. The latter was born in Washington 

Oct. 13, 1829. county. Pa., daughter of John Sutor, and 

John Lydick, founder of the family in In- died in East Mahoning township in 1884. aged 

diana county, was a native of Ireland, and seventy-six years; she is buried in I\Iarion 

came to America at an early day. He was Center cemetery. The children born to Isaac 

among the pioneer settlers of Indiana conn- Lydick were: George T.. who is deceased; 

ty, locating on the :McGaughey tract, in what Joseph ; Mary, who married Hugh Lawson . 

is now Cherryhill township, and owing to (both are deceased) ; Margaret, who married 

the wild conditions prevailing was driven out Dr. Young ; Beal, who died young ; Agnes, who 

several times by Indians. The last time he married Enoch Hastings, of Armstrong 

remained away seven years before risking county; Adoniram Judson, who is deceased; 

his life again. Eventually, however, he found Enoeli. who died in Arkansas; Emma, who 

he could live peaceably. 'and followed farm- married Albert Ponehes and lives in Ohio; 

ing and hunting with profit. His children and John S., who lives at Vaudergrift, Penn- 

were : John, Jacob, Patrick, James, Elizabeth, sylvania. 

Barbara, Margaret and Catherine. " Joseph Lydick received a good common 
Patrick Lydick, son of John Lydick, was a school training during the winter seasons, at- 
farmer all of his useful life, and made his tending school in Green township and at Day- 
home on the new State road, in Rayne (what ton and Brookville, working on his mother's 
was then Green) township. During the war farm in summer. He was only nine years old 
of 1812 he gave his country patriotic service when he had the misfortune to lose his father, 
as a soldier. The death of this excellent man and he helped his mother at home and worked 
occurred on his property, and his remains as farm assistant to others for small wages, 
were interred in Washington Church eeme- When he was seventeen years old he began 
tery. In religious faith he was a Presby- learning cabinetmaking at Brookville, and fol- 
terian. Patrick Lydick married Mary Mc- lowed the trade for several years, establishing 
Henry, who also died on the farm, and is himself in business at Brookville. Continuing 
buried beside her husband. Their children same for five years, he sold out m 1855 and 
were: John, married Elizabeth Chapman: returned to the homestead, and devoted his 
Isaac is mentioned below; James, married 150 acres to general farming and stock raising 
Sarah Chapman and (second) Rebecca John- for many years. At last he sold sixty acres, 
son; William, married Mary Neff; Patrick, and still retaining ninety acres, which his 
married Jane A. Hamilton; Samuel, married son operated after the father's retirement. 



872 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



ilr. Lydifk made many valuable improve- 
ments upon his property, taking a pride in 
having it well managed. The Buffalo & Sus- 
quehanna railroad runs through one end of 
the farm, and its value was verj' materially 
increased by this. There is gas on the land, 
and two wells are now in operation. Always 
a man of earnest convictions, Mr. Lydiek had 
a strong character, and his habits of industry 
and thrift made him universally respected. 

On February' li, lS6i, ilr. Lydiek was en- 
tered as a member of Compauj- H, 78th Penn- 
sylvania Infanti-y, under Colonel Bonueton, 
and Capt. Paul Crawford, and was mustered 
out in October, 1865, after having been a 
brave and efficient soldier. Always a strong 
Republican, he gave his hearty and enthusias- 
tic support to President Taft during the cam- 
paign of 1912. For many years he was a val- 
ued member of the ^Mahoning Baptist Church, 
taught in the Sunday school, and served as 
Sunday school superintendent. 

In March, 1853, Mr. Lydiek was married 
to Helen A. Silvis, who was born in Clinton 
county, Pa., daughter of Henry Silvis. They 
had the following children: George T., who 
is operating the homestead ; Virginia B., who 
is at home ; Harry S., who is of Pittsburg, as 
is Ernest B. 

]\Ir. and ^Mrs. L.ydick were married nearly 
sixty years, ilr. Lydiek was well preserved 
and in good health, and had remarkable eye- 
sight, being able to read without glasses; "his 
other faculties were also in excellent condi- 
tion, with the exception of his hearing. His 
death occurred February 9, 1913. Mrs. Ly- 
diek has been an invalid for several years. 

GEORGE HENRY CURFMAN, late of 
Arcadia, Indiana county, was in charge of 
the office of the Pennsylvania Coal & Coke 
Company at that place for the last ten years 
of his life. He had become intimately asso- 
ciated with the bests interests of that vicinity 
and town during his residence there. He 
filled public positions of trust, was serving as 
justice of the peace at the time of his death, 
and had the esteem of all who came in con- 
tact with him, in business life, in his official 
capacity or as a private citizen, ilr. Curf- 
man was a native of Baltimore, Md.. born 
November 6, 1861, son of Daniel and S. ( Jlase- 
more) Curfman, both of whom were born in 
Maryland. His father was a manufacturer 
of paper. 

Mr. Curfman attended school at Baltimore 
until he reached the age of thirteen years. 
He subsequently continued his studies at 



Bloomington, 111., and at Ashland and Fair- 
field, Neb., at the latter place going to Fair- 
field College. For two years after leaving 
school he was emploj^ed as a telegraph opera- 
tor in the West, and then spent eighteen 
months in California before returning East, to 
Altoona, Pa. Taking a position as telegraph 
operator at Roaring Spring, Blair county. 
Pa., with the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany; he remained there until transferred to 
.ilartinsburg, same county, where he was 
agent and operator five years. He was next 
at Patton, Cambria county. Pa., as agent and 
operator for the Peuns.vlvauia Railroad Com- 
pany, being at that point for ten years, at the 
end of which period he resigned to take a posi- 
tion- with the Beech Creek Coal & Coke Com- 
pany, as civil engineer. He was engaged in 
that capacity until the end of December, 1902, 
on January 1, 1903, being sent to Arcadia, to 
take charge of the company's office there. 
The Beech Creek Coal & Coke Company has 
.since become a part of the Pennsylvania Coal 
& Coke Company, which he continued to serve 
in the same capacity. He was also superin- 
tendent of the Hooverhurst & Southwestern 
railroad, which has ten miles of track in In- 
diana county, and is an important feature in 
the development of coal properties in this 
region, aifordiug a convenient outlet for the 
product of several mining companies. He 
was one of the original surveyors in the local 
coal district — in ^Montgomery township and 
the surrounding portion of Indiana county. 

Mr. Curfman was a Republican and took 
considerable interest in politics, and he was 
active in local affairs, having served as audi- 
tor of Banks township, and in 1908 assuming 
the duties of justice of the peace. He was a 
director of the Fir.st National Bank of Glen 
Campbell. ]Mr. Curfman was a leading mem- 
ber in the Presbyterian Church, of which he 
was a ruling elder, and fraternally he held 
membership in the I. 0. 0. F. His death, 
which was accidental, occurred at Arcadia 
July 9. 1912. 

On December 2-t, 1891. ^Ir. Curfman mar- 
ried Annie Katherine Miller, of Martinsburg. 
Blair county. Pa., daughter of John and Hen- 
rietta (Kocher) ^liller: her father was a cab- 
inetmaker by occupation. ]\Ir. and Jlrs. Curf- 
man had one child, John Edwin, born Feb- 
ruary 22, 1898. ilrs. Curfman now resides 
at JMartinsburg. Pennsylvania. 

JOSEPH A. McCLARAN. druggist, of 
S.iltsburg. Indiana county, is one of the old- 
established business mem of that borough. 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



873 



where he has also become well known in his 
ofScial capacity as postmaster. He was born 
there May 25, 1866, son of James and Cather- 
ine (Andre) McClarau, the former of whom 
was of Scotch-Irish antecedents, the latter of 
German descent. 

James McClaran, the father, was born in 
February, 1829, in Westmoreland county. Pa., 
and died in 1883. He was a saddler, and fol- 
lowed Ms trade for a number of years, later 
engaging in business as a merchant. He mar- 
ried Catherine Andre, who was born in In- 
diana county, Pa., daughter of Joseph Andre, 
of Indiana, Pa., and died in 1910. They were 
the parents of four children: Fred, a drug- 
gist, of Beaver Falls, Pa. ; Joseph A. ; ilary, 
who died in 1886, when eighteen years old; 
and Rome, who is assistant postmaster at 
Saltsburg. 

Joseph A. McClaran began the drug busi- 
ness in young manhood, and has been en- 
gaged in that line of trade at Saltsburg for 
the last twenty-seven years. He has built up 
a thriving patronage by honorable dealing and 
reliable goods, and merits the confidence in 
which he is held by his acquaintances in all 
the relations of life. He is serving as post- 
master at Saltsbui-g, a position to which he 
was appointed March 3, 1901, by President 
McKinley, and reappointed under both Roose- 
velt and Taft, and his highly satisfactory 
service in the office is characteristic of all he 
does. For twenty-three consecutive years, 
since 1889, he has been a member of the board 
of school directors of the borough. Mr. Mc- 
Claran attends the M. E. Church. He is a 
member of Saltsburg Lodge, No. 431, F. & A. 
M., and of Bloomsburg Consistory (thirty-sec- 
ond degree). 

On April 23, 1889, Mr. McClaran married 
Anna A. Gamison, daughter of S. S. and 
Angeline (Beaty) Gamison, of Saltsburg, and 
five children have been born to them: Ken- 
neth, born in 1890, now in Pittsburg; Mary 
Beatrice, at home; Angela, who died iu in- 
fancv ; Fred, born in 1900 ; and Anna L., born 
in 1904. 

WILLIAM BIGLER HILL, at one time an 
extensive lumberman, now engaged princi- 
pally in buying and selling coal lands, is a 
resident of Indiana and has lived all his life 
in Indiana county. He was born on the home 
farm in jMontgomery township, Indiana 
county, Feb. 20, 1852. son of Daniel Hill. In 
both the paternal and maternal lines he is of 
Scotch-Irish descent. His grandfather, Daniel 
Hill, Sr., was born in the eastern part of 



Pennsylvania and remained there until he at- 
tained his majority, when he joined the hardy 
pioneers who were venturing into the forest 
regions west of the Allegheny mountains, set- 
tling iu Westmoreland county, Pa., where he 
died. 

Daniel Hill, son of Daniel, was born in 
1817, and died at Twolick, in White township, 
Indiana county. He learned the trade of mill- 
wright. Removing to Armstrong county, Pa., 
he remained there until 1855, when he came 
to Indiana county and embarked in the lum- 
ber business on the Susquehanna river, fol- 
lowing same until 1880. He then removed to 
White township, and also lived in Green and 
Cherryhill townships. He was a member of 
the Democratic party and took considerable 
interest in its work, holding several township 
offices. In religion he was a Presbyterian. He 
married Eliza A. Trimble, who was born in 
1811, daughter of Thomas Trimble, a life- 
long resident and well-to-do farmer of West- 
moreland county. Pa., who died in 1850. Mrs. 
Hill died in 1866. 

William Bigler Hill passed his early years 
in Montgomery township, and was twelve 
years old when his father moved to Green 
township. His first work was on the mail 
route conducted by his brothere, Jethro and 
Thomas. When they went to serve in the 
Union army during the Civil war another 
brother, John (now an attorney in Indiana), 
took Jethro 's place, and when John went to 
the war William took his place. He carried 
mail in 1863-64 from Cherrytree to George- 
ville. He then went into the woods and en- 
gaged in lumbering with his father, working 
in the timber, and driving logs on the Sus- 
quehanna. About 1870 he engaged in the 
lumber business with his brother Archie, and 
they did an extensive business, for ten years 
driving from seven million to ten million feet 
of lumber annually; it was mostly pine and 
hemlock. In 1884 "the lirothers dissolved part- 
nership, and for some time thereafter Wil- 
liam B. Hill was occupied in looking after his 
sawmills, of which he had several, also ship- 
ping lumber, which he still continues. For 
the last ten years, however, he has devoted 
most of his attention to buying and selling 
coal land, having disposed of ten thousand 
acres, to coal companies ; he now has an option 
on 15,000 acres. I'ntil 1904 he lived on his 
farm of eighty-four acres in White township, 
moving thence to the borough of Indiana, 
where he built the fine two-stoiy brick resi- 
dence at the corner of Sixth street and Carter 
avenue which he and his family have since 



574 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



occupied. Mr. Hill has uot taken any part 
in public matters, but he is a stanch Democrat 
iu his political views. In religion he is a 
Presbyterian. 

On Dec. 24, 1880, Mr. Hill was married, in 
Cherryhill township, to Minetta Long, of that 
township, daughter of Benjamin and Susan 
(Burnham) Long. They have had a family 
of eleven children : Carrie, who lives at home ; 
Thomas T. ; Ross, an electrician, now living 
in Liverpool, Ohio, who married Florence 
Helm, daughter of Rev. Mr. Helm, of Leech- 
burg, Pa. ; Robert, an electrician, of Liver- 
pool, Ohio; James, at home; Norman, of 
Akron, Ohio; Edgar, at home; Arthur, at 
home ; Mildred : Jean ; and one deceased. 

Thomas T. Hill, eldest sou of William Big- 
ler Hill, was born in Cherryhill township, In- 
diana county. He attended the .country 
schools in White township, graduated from 
the Indiana high school, and then entered the 
normal school in that borough, from which 
institution he was graduated with the honors 
of his class. For the next two years he taught 
mathematics at the normal school, and then 
wpnt to Ann Arbor (Mich.) LTniversity to take 
a course in law. He graduated in 1910, at 
the head of his class. IMr. Hill then became 
principal of the high school at Leechburg, 
Armstrong Co., Pa., which position he has 
filled with the highest efficiency for the last 
two years. 

COLLTIMBUS McCOY, former commissioner 
of Indiana county, now living iu retirement 
in Indiana borough, was born there Jan. 14, 
1S51, son of Church Smith McCoy. His pater- 
nal grandfather came from Ireland, was mar- 
ried in this country to a iliss Smith, and 
settled on a fann in Armstrong county, Pa. 
Their children were : Daniel, who mai-ried a 
]\Iiss Smith, and died in Armstrong count.v. 
Pa., aged over seventy-two years: Church 
Smith ; and John, born June 4, 1827, who died 
June 24, 1899, unmarried. Mi-s. McCoy mar- 
ried for her second husband a Mr. Millen, and 
they liad three children: Mary Jane, Mrs. 
John Ballentine, deceased : Nanc.v. Mrs. John 
Wagner, of Armstrong county; and Jackson, 
a veteran of the Civil war, who died unmar- 
ried and is buried at Marion Center. 

Church Smith McCoy, born July 5. 1824, in 
Armstrong county, was given a common school 
education and reared to farming. He learned 
the carpenter's trade in Indiana and followed 
it all liis life, doing contract ^vork. He was a 
Republican in politics, and took some part in 
local affairs, serving as member of the town 



council. He died in Indiana Oct. 18, 1890. 
Church Smith McCoy married Mary Jane Me- 
Cardell, who was born Feb. 1, 1825, in Sink- 
ing Valley, Huntingdon Co., Pa., and died in 
Indiana May 31, 1886. Mr. and Mrs. McCoy 
were members of the M. E. Church. To them 
was born a family of twelve children, namely : 
Bmeline, ilrs. John G. Thompson, of Black- 
lick township, this county ; John S., deceased, 
who seiwed ninety days during the Civil war. 
in a Pennsj'lvania regiment, and who married 
ilargaret Kline; Sarah Jane, Mrs, W. T. 
Lively, of Blacklick township, who died Jan. 
1, 1913 ; Columbus ; William, who died j'oung ; 
David Milton, of Vandergrift, who married 
Mary Gibson ; George S., of Vandergrift, who 
married Mary Heffelfiuger; Edward, who 
died in infancy; Mary Mirelda, Mrs. William 
Lockard, of Homer City ; Clara Myrtle, ]\Irs. 
William P. Stormer, of White township ; 
Charles, who died at Wilkinsburg, Pa,, Feb. 2, 
1913 (he married Catherine Stephens) ; and 
Arabelle, Mrs. Harry Wohler, of Homer City. 

Columbus McCoy has spent all his life in 
Indiana and White township. He attended 
the public schools in Indiana and learned the 
carpenter's trade under his father, and in 
time became engaged in contracting, which 
he followed for some years. In 1888 he moved 
to a farm in White township which he culti- 
vated for ten years, coming to Indiana in 
1898. Mr. McCoy has been ciuite prominent in 
the work of the Republican party in his sec- 
tion, and has servecl one term as county com- * 
missioner. 1903-04-05. | 

On aiarch 21. 1872. Mr. :McCoy married " 
Jlartha Eleanor Simpson, who was bom May 
10, 1850, on her father's farm in Brushvalley 
township, this count.v. She received her early 
education in the country schools, later attencl- 
ing night school at Mechanicsburg. She 
taught for three years in Buffington township. 
Mr. and Mrs. McCoy live at No. 50 Soutli 
Fifth street. They are the parents of three 
children: (1) William E., born June 30, 
1873, now living in Pittsburg, married Nannie 
J. Johnston, and has one child. Darrel. (2) 
Albert Clinton, bom April 27, 1875, now liv- 
ing in Center township, married Anna ^lary 
Reed, and has had children. J. Wilson, Elmer 
Simpson (deceased'*, IMurray Reed, Ruth 
Pearl, John Blair and Mai"y Luella, (3^ 
'SUna Pearl, born April 30. 1878, married 
Clark Myers, and lives iu Homer City; they 
have children, Edward Clair, Martha Pearl 
and Helen Jean, The parents are members 
of the M. E. Church. 

Tlugli Simpson, father of !\lrs. ]\IcCoy, was 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



875 



born in County Donegal, Ireland, Sept. 5, 
1818, son of Solomon Simpson, who married 
Catherine Smith, of County Donegal. The 
family came to Amei-ica in 1820, and settled 
on wild land in Indiana county, where the 
parents died. Hugh Simpson married Mar- 
garet J. McFeathers, who died in Brushvalley 
township at the age of thirty -three years, and 
he subsequently married (second) Martha 
Findley. He removed to West Virginia, buy- 
ing a farm in Hampshire coi;nty upon which 
he lived until his death Sept. 29, 1909. His 
children were as follows: Martha Eleanor, 
Mrs. McCoy; Catherine Ann, Mrs. William 
Campbell, of Johnston. Pa. ; Margaret Jane, 
Mrs. John Allender, of West Virginia; Wil- 
liam, of West Virginia, who married Ellen 
Dennison ; and Hugh Solomon, of West Vir- 
ginia, who married Nancy Cheney and (sec- 
ond) Iliff Lang. Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Simpson 
were members of the United Presbyterian 
Church. 

BOYD AV. HAWES, member of the firm of 
Hawes Brothei-s, general merchants, at 
Cherrytree, Indiana county, is a leading busi- 
ness man of that borough, and the establish- 
ment which he and his brother conduct was 
founded by their father over twenty years ago. 
Mr. Hawes was born Dec. 25, 1868, in Clear- 
field county. Pa., son of Henry B. Hawes and 
grandson of Jacob Hawes, a farmer, who 
passed all his life in Lancaster county, this 
State. The family is of Dutch ancestry. 

Heni-y B. Hawes, father of Boyd W. Hawes, 
was born Sept. 4, 1845, at Turkey Hill, in 
Manor township, Lancaster county, and there 
passed his early life. During the Civil war 
he enlisted from that county in the Union 
service, first becoming a member of Company 
B, 20th Pennsylvania Cavalry, was later in 
Company I. and still later in Company H, 1st 
Provisional Regiment, Pennsylvania Volun- 
teer Cavalry, serving to the end of the con- 
flict. He was discharged July 22, 1865, at 
Clouds Mills, Va. After the war he went to 
Clearfield county, where he engaged in wagon- 
making, having learned the trade of black- 
smith, and he also carried on lumbering, at 
Bi;rnside. Clearfield county. In 1887 he came 
to Cherrytree. Indiana county, where he first 
was interested in manufacturing wagons and 
buggies, and conducted a foundry, after a 
few years engaging in the general mercantile 
business, which he continued for eighteen 
years. In time his two sons. Boyd W. and 
Norman G. Hawes. took over his mercantile 
interests, under the firm name of 



Brothers. Mr. Hawes, the father, is now re- 
tired, he and his wife continuing to make their 
home at Cherrytree. In 1878 he drilled the 
first gas well on the Twolick creek, in Indiana 
county. 

On March 5, 1868, Mr. Hawes married 
Sarah Glass, daughter of William Glass, who 
settled in Indiana county at an early day, liv- 
ing in Brushvalley township. To this union 
were born four children, of whom Boyd W. is 
the eldest; Norman G. is his partner in the 
firm of Hawes Brothers ; Harry is also a resi- 
dent of Cherrytree, where he was engaged in 
the general mercantile business ; Paul died in 
the year 1880. 

Boyd W. Hawes received considerable of 
his early education in Butler county. Pa., and 
after coming to Indiana county attended 
school here. When a young man he learned 
the trade of blacksmith, which he followed at 
Cherrytree for some time before engaging in 
mercantile business. He and his brother have 
done a steadily increasing business, and by 
irreproachable transactions and a thoroughly 
progressive polix;y have maintained a high 
position in the ousiness circles of the place. 
As their trade grew they moved to more com- 
modious quarters, now having one of the larg- 
est stores in Indiana county. Boyd W. Hawes, 
in addition to his interest in the firm of Hawes 
Brothers, has had other business connections 
in the borough, being a stockholder in the 
Cherrytree Electric Light, Heat & Power 
Company, and in the Cherrytree Water Com- 
pany. He has given some of his time to secur- 
ing adeciuate public service, at present being 
a member of the school board of Cherrytree 
borough. 

On June 6, 1893, Mr. Hawes was united in 
marriage with Rose Patrick, a native of Burn- 
side, Clearfield Co., Pa., daughter of Chamber- 
lain and Catherine (Kneedler) Patrick, the 
former of whom is deceased. He was engaged 
as a blacksmith and carriagemaker at Burn- 
side. Eight children have been born to l\Tr. 
and Mrs. Hawes, namely : Zelda ; Mary ; Mar 
garet, deceased: Harry; Lynn; Alice, de- 
ceased; Sarah, and Frederick. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hawes are members of the Presbyterian 
Church, and socially he belongs to Lincoln 
Lodge, No. 28. Knights of Pythias, of which 
bodv he is treasurer, and to Indiana Lodge, 
No.'931, B. P. 0. Elks. 

FREDERICK WEITZEL has been a suc- 
cessful business man and farmer, active in 
public affairs, a leading member of the Chris- 
tian Church and a prominent worker in the 



876 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Prohibition party in his township and the 
county. He is a resident of Banks township, 
Indiana county, and one of its best-known 
citizens. Born May 6, 1836, in Hessenstaat, 
Germany, he is a son of Jolm George and 
Elizabeth Weitzel. His father was a farmer 
and tailor in Germany, and continued to fol- 
low farming after he brought his family to 
this country, settling in Indiana county, Pa., 
where he bought 135 acres of land in Canoe 
township, which he cleared and cultivated. 

Frederick Weitzel received his education in 
Germany, graduating from school there in 
1850. Coming with his father to America, he 
was trained to farming and has followed that 
occupation all his life, now owning farm prop- 
erty in Banks township, about 130 acres of 
good land. For twenty years Mr. Weitzel was 
in business, carrying on furniture and under- 
taking establishments at Glen Campbell and 
^ Smithport (postoffice Ilortons), this county. 
He was senior member of the firm of F. Weit- 
zel & Sons, his sons W. P. and J. C. Weitzel 
having been associated with him. Though 
busy with the management of his private af- 
fairs he also found time to talje part in public 
matters, and he was honored with election 
to offices of trust, having served many years 
as school director, and also in the positions 
of township auditor and township clerk. IMr. 
Weitzel is a strong Prohibitionist, and has 
always been an earnest worker in Indiana 
county in the cause of Prohibition, which he 
has aided whenever possible by his influence. 
He was one of the charter members of the 
Christian Church at Hortons, and has served 
as elder since the organization. Highly re- 
spected in all the associations of life, he has 
an enviable standing in the communitv. 

On Dec. 20, 1860, Mr. Weitzel married 
Elizabeth Coy, of Westmoreland county, Pa., 
daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Coy, and 
six children have been born to them: (1) 
Laura Bell is the wife of R. Y. Smith, of 
Baldwin county, Ala., a inercbant and planter, 
and their children are Walter K., Lula Grace, 
Thomas Boyd and Fredei-ick Lloyd (twins), 
Sandy John, Allen Frost and Goldie.' (2) 
Joseph C. is a traveling salesman and makes 
his home in Indiana borough. He married 
Jennie Guthrie, of Indiana county, and they 
have three children, Frederick. Marion and 
Eugene. (3) Luther ;\[iles, a merchant of 
Rome, Ga., married Josephine Stephenson, of 
Jefferson county, who died leaving one child, 
Carl. Mr. Weitzel married for his second 
wife Lelia Wilt, of York. Pa., and they have 
one child. LeRov. (4) Anna Alfaretta (Dol- 



lie) is the wife of Thomas P. Brickel, a mer- 
chant of Smithport, and they have a family 
of five children : Imogene, Roxie, Viola, 
Bertha Lucile and another daughter. (5) 
Bertha E. is the wife of Harry Fairbank, of 
Omaha, Nebr., government meat inspector. 
(6) William Forest, who is a practicing physi- 
cian at Indiana, married Arveda Gourley, of 
Jefferson county, Pennsylvania. 

WILLIAM E. BOWSER, D. D. S., is one 
of the best-known residents of Plumville, In- 
diana county, where he is engaged in the prac- 
tice of dentistiy and carries on the livery busi- 
ness, besides acting as postmaster. He is a 
native of Armstrong county, born Feb. 5, 
1860, at Elderton, where his father, Anderson 
Bowser, was in business for some time. 

Anderson Bowser, the father, was a native 
of Bedford county. Pa., son of George Bowser. 
Coming to Armstrong county he settled at 
Brady's Bend, near Elderton, where he fol- 
lowed the trade of molder and foundryman. 
Later moving to Kittanning, same county, he 
also worked at his trade tliere, and afterward 
went to Elderton, where he engaged in the 
foundry business with John Craft. He sub- 
sequently followed the business on his own 
account for twelve years, and at the end of 
that period came to Plumville, in South Ma- 
honing township, Indiana county, where he 
continued to make his home to the end of his 
days. He was in business for himself there, 
always working in the same line, and met with 
success. Mr. Bowser died May 8, 1876, and 
is buried at Plumville. He was a member of 
the M. E. Church, to which his wife, Mary 
(Templeton), also belongs. She died Feb. 3. 
1913, when over eighty-three years old, and 
had made her home with her son Dr. Wil- 
liam E. Bowser, at Brady's Bend, Armstrong 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Bowser had children 
as follows: Mary, who is now deceased; 
]\Iartha; Jerry, deceased; Thomas, deceased: 
Clarilla, deceased; William E. : and Nancy, 
deceased. 

William E. Bowser was six years old wlien 
tlie family came to Plumville, Indiana county, 
and there he had the advantages afforded by 
file public schools. For a time he worked in 
the foundry with his father, after which he 
look up the study of dentistry with Dr. N. L. 
Park, at Marion Center, later attending dental 
college at Philadelphia, where he was gradu- 
ated in 1893. He practiced for three years 
before coming lo Plumville. in 1893. where he 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



has had an office for nineteen years and es- 
tablished a protitable patronage. He is one 
of the leading dentists in Indiana county, his 
work standing the test of time, and his i-epu- 
tation extending beyond the limits of his 
home district. Over twenty years ago Dr. 
Bowser started in the livery business at Plum- 
ville, being the pioneer in that line there, and 
he has been engaged in same continuously 
since. In 1898, dui'ing President McKinley's 
administration, he was appointed postmaster 
to succeed J. C. Pierce, and has continued to 
serve the community in that capacity since. 
Dr. Bowser is recognized by all who know him 
as a broad-minded, intelligent citizen, and he 
has given eminent satisfaction in his public 
services and in all the other relations of life. 
He is conscientious in his professional work, a 
thorough business man in all his undertakings, 
and interested in everything Avhich concerns 
the general welfare. He is a member of the 
Postmasters' Association, and socially belongs 
to the Odd Fellows' lodge at Plumville. In 
political opinion he is a Republican, but in 
politics as in other affairs he is liberal and 
inclined to support whatever he thinks will 
conduce to the good of the greatest number. 
On March 8, 1888, Dr. Bowser was married 
in North Mahoning township, this county, to 
La Vinnia Pounds, who was born in George- 
ville, Indiana county, daughter of James and 
Hannah (Kimple) Pounds. They have no 
children. Dr. and Mrs. Bowser are members 
of the M. E. Church at Plumville, and highly 
esteemed in that connection. 

PROF. JOSIAS H. YOUNG has been asso- 
ciated with the business and educational life 
of the borough of Indiana almost continuously 
since the close of the Civil war. Though he 
prepared for the ministry he did not follow 
the profession long, because of his health. He 
was born in April, 1837, in Belfast, Ireland, 
son of Robert and Mary (Hillman) Young, 
the former also a native of Belfast, and a 
watchmaker and jeweler by occvipation. The 
mother died in Ireland, when her son Josias 
was quite young, and the father subsequently 
came with his family to America. He worked 
at his trade with his son Robert in Indiana, 
Indiana Co., Pa., and died there in 1859, at 
the age of sixty-four years. He and his wife 
were Presbyterians in religious faith. They 
had children as follows : Margaret, who mar- 
ried James Blair, of Ireland, with whom she 
came to America, settling with her brother in 
San Francisco eventually, and she remarried 
there after Mr. Blair's death and died there 



(her second husband was named Anderson) ; 
Maria, who married Bei'nard McQuade, and 
died in Ireland; James, who married Eliza- 
beth McGonigle, and died in California ; Rob- 
ert A., who died in Indiana in 1888; Eliza- 
beth, who married James McGonigle and (sec- 
ond) Matthew Steele, and died in Belfast, 
Ireland; William, who died in Philadelphia, 
Pa., when seventy-six years old (he married) ; 
Mary, Mrs. Gardner Pepper, who died in 
Pennsylvania; and Josias H. 

Josias H. Young attended school in his 
native land until he came to the United States 
with his father, at the age of twelve years. 
He spent his first few years in this country at 
Philadelphia, and attended what was known 
as the Presbyterian Institute, taught by Rev. 
Dr. Coleman, a noted linguist, under whom 
the youth studied German, Latin and Greek. 
He was apprenticed to learn the trade of 
jeweler, but gave it up to continue his studies, 
and entering the University of Pennsylvania 
was graduated from that institution with the 
class of 1859. He then took a course at Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary, graduating there- 
from in 1862. He entered the ministry, but 
soon gave it up on account of his health, and 
has since been engaged in business and edu- 
cational pursuits. When the Civil war broke 
out he went to enlist, and was offered a second 
lieutenancy in the Philadelphia Zouaves, who 
covered the retreat at the first battle of Bull 
Run. His guardian interfered with his plans 
for serving- in the Union army, but allowed 
him to become a member of the United States 
Christian Commission, which did hospital 
work, nursing the sick and wounded on and 
off the field. At the close of the war he came 
to Indiana, Pa., and engaged in the jewelry 
business with his brother Robert here for eight 
years, during which time he was also con- 
nected with the normal school, having been 
elected to the chair of languages, which he 
filled for seven years. He then acted as 
principal of the borough public schools for 
seven years, at the end of which period he 
went to New Yorlf City, where he was in the 
jewelry and diamond business for three years. 
Returning to western Pennsjdvania, he was 
principal of a ward school in Pittsburg for 
two years, and then came again to Indiana. 
where he became interested in the Indiana 
Leather Company, for which he traveled, and 
was also similarly associated with the Indiana 
Ladder Company. He has disposed of his 
intei-ests in both, and is now following other 
lines of business. 

Three years ago Mr. Young took up the 



878 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



study of Esperanto, the world lan^age, and 
he now has a class of twelve in Indiana, in- 
eluding representative citizens of the borough. 
He has been a Republican in politics, recently 
taking up Progressive principles. 

In 1871 Mr. Young was married in Indiana 
to Laura L. Hildebrand, of that place, daugh- 
ter of Edward P. and Elizabeth (Woods) 
Hildebrand, and they have had three children : 
Florence B., now the wife of Walter H. Jack- 
son; Edith M., wife of John A. Scott, of In- 
diana; and Elizabeth, who was married in 
June, 1912, to Harry P. Beans, of Indiana. 

EVANS. Jlembers of the Evans family of 
Indiana county were among the first of the 
early settlers of western Pennsylvania. The 
first of the name in this county was Hugh 
Evans, who was a native of Wales, born in 
Cardiff, where he grew to maturity. When a 
young man he left his native home to try his 
foi-tune in the western world. He crossed the 
Atlantic on a sailing vessel, working for his 
passage. Among his fellow passengers was a 
young English girl who intended to make her 
future home in the United States, and the 
young Welshman wooed her so successfully 
that when they landed at Philadelphia, where 
they spent a short time, they married. The 
young couple then came West, locating first 
at the Welsh settlement near Evausburg. 
They soon moved from there to Indiana 
county, locating in Brushvalley township, on 
a tract of land where Hugh Evaiis built his 
little log home and started to clear a farm 
from a wilderness. After remaining on this 
farm for a few years he sold it and bought a 
400-acre bush and timber tract, a part of 
which is now included in Mechanicsburg. 
Here he started to make his future home, 
erecting a log cabin and barn. By hard work 
he cleared up much of his land and made other 
improvements on the property, putting up a 
frame dwelling house, barn, et cetera. He 
also erected a saw and grist mill, the first of 
its kind in the township, ilr. Evans spent his 
life on this farm, and there died at the age of 
sixty years. He was buried on the farm, in 
what is now known as the Evans family ceme- 
tery. A man noted for his enterprise and 
progressive ideas, he was hardworking and 
industrious, much devoted to his home and 
family. He was a member of the Baptist 
Church, as were also his wife and children. 
His widow died on the farm and was buried 
in the family plot there. The seven children 
born to this marriage were as follows: John ; 
Ann, wlio married John Kelley and (second) 



James Stewart; Hugh, who died in Altooua, 
Pa, ; Mary, who married Henry Grumbling ; 
Elizabeth (Betsey), who married Joseph Mc- 
Nutt, of Brushvalley township; Evan, who 
lived and died in Brushvalley township ; and 
James, who died in Center township, 

John Evans, eldest son of Hugh Evans, was 
bom in Brushvalley township, and what edu- 
cation he i-eeeived was obtained in the schools 
of that section. He grew up on the farm of 
his father and made farming and stock raising 
his life occupation, receiving 250 acres of the 
homestead farm. There he erected buildings 
and made other improvements, passing all his 
life on the place, where he died at the age of 
seventy years, seven months, and is buried in 
the family lot, the Evans graveyard. He was 
a member of the Baptist Church, of which he 
was deacon. He was a Whig and Republican, 
but took no active part in public life. He was 
a strong admirer of the martj'red President 
Lincoln and during the Civil war his sympatliy 
was with the Union, his only son enlisting to 
uphold the flag and preserve the Union. He 
was mari-ied in Brushvalley township to Eliza- 
beth Sanderson, a native of Hagerstown, Md., 
daughter of Thomas Sanderson, who had set- 
tled in that township, Mrs. Evans died on the 
farm and is buried in the family cemeteiy. 
She was a member of the Baptist Church, a 
devoted wife and mother, doing her duty by 
her family, which consisted of eight children : 
Ben.iamin, who died in Brushvalley township ; 
Maria, who married John Bracken, and both 
died in East Wheatfield township : Emily, who 
married John Finley, of Blairsville (he died 
in Brushvalley township) ; Lucinda, who is 
the widow of William Conrad and resides in 
East Wheatfield township; Susan, who mar- 
ried David Overdoff (both are deceased) ; 
Elizabeth, who married Thomas Gregory, and 
died in Franklin, Pa. ; Rebecca, who married 
Finley Campbell, and died in Johnston; and 
John Sanderson. 

JoriN Sanderson Evans, youngest child of 
John and Elizabeth ( Sanderson 'i Evans, was 
born on the homestead farm in Brushvalley 
township Aug, 13, 1844, His education was 
acquired in the public schools of his native 
to^^Tlship, and from early life he was ac- 
customed to work on the farm, which he helped 
to operate until the death of his father. He 
tlien became the owner, and continued to 
cultivate the place during his active life, en- 
iraging in general farming and stock raising. 
He also bought the Chambers farm in the 
same townsliip, a tract of 162 acres which he 
likewise operated. In 1908 he retired from 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



879 



farming, moving to Homer City, where he 
built a home and where he and his wife are 
enjoying the evening of a well-spent life, reap- 
ing the benefits of years of toil. 

During the Civil war Mr. Evans enlisted, 
Aug. 20, 1864, in Company H, 206th P. V. I., 
1st Brigade, 2d Division, 21th Army Corps, 
being under the command of Capt. J.- C. Grear 
and Col. Hugh J. Brady. He was stationed 
for a time in front of Petersburg and later at 
Richmond. Mr. Evans spent ten months in 
the service, being mustered out at the close of 
the war, June 10, 186.5. He has been a stanch 
supporter of the Republican party, a firm be- 
liever in its principles, and is a strong admirer 
of Roosevelt. He served the townshiji of 
Brushvalley as supervisor, was assessor two 
terms, tax collector one term, school director 
and overseer of the poor two terms. He is a 
member of the Grand Arm_y of the Republic, 
belonging to Bolar Post, at Homer City, and 
is chaplain of his post. He and his family 
are members of the M. E. Church, of which he 
is steward, trustee and class leader. Mr. 
Evans is a strong advocate of temperance, a 
citizen and family man who wo.uld do credit 
to any community. He educated his nine 
children well and gave them all a fair start in 
life, and they reflect credit on him and his 
devoted wife, being thrifty and industrious 
citizens, of sterling worth. 

On July 16, 1865, Mr, Evans married 
Metilda Helman, who was born in Wheatfield 
township, daughter of Adam and Mary (Fry) 
Helman. To this union were born children 
as follows: (1) Harry H., born March 28, 
1867, is an electrical engineer, and resides at 
Renton, Wash. He married Rhoda Croyle, 
and has five children, Joseph, John Bair, 
Name, Beulah and Edwin. (2) Bennett B., 
born March 21, 1869, is an engineer on the 
Pennsylvania railroad and makes his home at 
Pittsburg. He married Sally Swaring, of 
Steubenville, Ohio, and their children are 
Ralph, Merle, Claretice and Harold. (3) 
Ella N., born Jan. 8, 1872, married James K. 
Altman, and resides in Brushvalley to^vn- 
ship. They have two children, Charles and 
Fanny. (4) Charles, born March 8, 1875, an 
engineer on the Pennsylvania railroad, resid- 
ing at Pittsburg, married Ida Echinger. (5) 
Albert P., born June 9, 1877, a farmer in 
Brushvalley township, married Mamie Bench- 
man. (6) Frank, born Dec. 5, 1880, residing 
in Pittsburg, married Nora Mock. (7) Ger- 
trude, born July 2, 188.3, resides at home. (8) 
Clair, born March 4, 1886, who lives on the 
homestead farm, married Alma McCrea, and 



they have two children, Blanch and Robert. 
(9) Elsie Edna, bom Sept. 2, 1889, married 
George Kelley, of Homer City, and has one 
child, Ruth. 

CHARLES CRONK, superintendent of the 
Lucerne Coal Mines, at North Homer, In- 
diana county, owned and operated by the- 
Rochester, Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company, 
has filled that position of trust and responsi- 
bility since July, 1912. Mr. Cronk is a na- 
tive of Pennsylvania, born in Luzerne county 
in June, 1862, a sou of James and Jane 
(Dean) Cronk. James Cronk, the father, was 
a lumberman and sawmill owner, being en- 
gaged in that kind of business nearly all his 
life, both in Pennsylvania and on the Pa- 
cific coast. 

Charles Cronk attended the local schools 
at his birthplace and was nine years old when 
he moved with his parents to Bradford county, 
Pa., the family locating at Carbon Run, where 
he continued his education. When a youth 
of fourteen years he went with an elder 
brother to work in the coal mines at Carbon 
Run, where he was employed as a coal miner 
until 1885, in which .year the family moved 
to Jefferson county. Pa. There Mr. Cronk 
followed his occupation of coal miner in the 
mines of the Jefferson Coal Company, and 
remained until 1901, at which time he went 
to West Virginia, locating in Barbour eoiinty. 
Becoming mine boss for the Jefferson Valley 
Coal & Coke Company, he continued in that 
capacity until July, 1904, when he accepted 
the position of superintendent of the mines 
of the Tygarts River Coal Company, at Arden, 
Barbour Co., W. Va.. holding it for two years. 
Then he came to Indiana county, Pa., and on 
Nov. 15, 1906, became assistant siiperintend- 
ent of the Lucerne Mines at North Homer, 
for The Rochester, Pittsburg Coal & Iron Com- 
pany. He acted in that capacity for six 
years, and in July, 1912, was made superin- 
tendent. The Lucerne mines were opened 
in December, 1905, on the Risinger farm, and 
the property was in the early stages of its 
development when Mr. Cronk assumed his 
duties as assistant superintendent. He has 
more than five hundred hands under his 
charge. He has become a most respected resi- 
dent of his adopted borough, and is at present 
serving as school director of Center township. 
He is a Republican in polities. He and his 
family are members of the M. E. Church of 
Homer City. 

Mr. Cronk married, in Jefferson county, 
Jennie Jones, and to this union six children 



880 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



were born: Margaret, who died when three 
years old; Cora H., who married Thomas 
Robinson ; James, a steam engineer ; Alice, at 
home; Catharine and William, both attend- 
ing school. 

RALPH F. McHENRY, M. D., practicing 
physician and surgeon of Heilwood, Indiana 
county, where he also conducts a modem, 
well-equipped hospital, was born at Frost- 
biu-g, Jefferson Co., Pa., Aug. 30, 1869, son 
of George Washington and Anna Rebecca 
(Keck) McHenry. 

The first of this branch of the McHenry 
famil,y to come to this country was Isaac 
McHenry, who was born in Scotland in 1734, 
and whose wife's name was Jane Smith or 
Sm>i:he, likely the latter, as the Scotch often 
spell the name that way. The first we know 
of Isaac is his taking the oath of allegiance, 
with Abraham Leasure and John Stutehel 
(Dallas Albert's History of Westmoreland 
County). The name is there spelled Mc- 
Hendry. This was in 1777. Later, before 
1800, "he settled three miles north of In- 
diana on what has been known as the James 
Hamilton farm. Thence he moved to what 
is now North IMahoning township, where he 
and his wife and two sons died in the fall 
of 1812, all during the same week, the par- 
ents aged aboiit eighty years, the son James 
aged thirty-three years and the son Samuel 
aged thirty-six years. They lie in the ceme- 
tery at Cilgal Church (this church was or- 
ganized in 1808). The father served as 
major in the Pennsylvania State militia. 
Isaac and Jane McHenry had children as 
follows: John married i\Iiss McCord : Wil- 
liam, born in 1770. married Sidney Gordon, 
and they were the grandparents of Squire 
McHenry. of Spangler, Pa., whose mother 
was a Row; William was with Anthony 
Wayne in Ohio in 1793 and 1794. and with 
him was his brother Isaac, who died in the 
service: ]\Iary married Patrick Lydick : 
James is mentioned below: Samuel married 
Marv :\IcCall: Joseph married Elizabeth 
Bovd: Jane married Robert Morrison; 
Sai-ah: Hannah married Daniel Morrison. 

James :\rcHenrv. son of Isaac and Jane 
IMcHonry. was born Feb. 15. 1779. three 
miles north of the town of Indiana. He was 
a major in the State militia, serving two 
terms under Governors Snyder and MeKean, 
and took part in the Indian war. He died 
in 1812 at the early age of thirty-three years, 
as already related. In 1795 he married Eliza- 
beth Stutehel (daughter of John), who was 
born Feb. 15. 1779, and died in 1851. There 



were born to them the following children: 
Catharine married Joseph Crossman; Isaac 
married Catharine McClelland ; John, born in 
1801, married Martha Jordan; James married 
Ann Neal; Mary married Asa Crossman; 
Elizabeth married George Timblin; Jane mar- 
ried William Postlewait. Of these, James 
and Ann (Neal) had children: Elizabeth 
married JMartin Reits ; William man-ied Lu- ■ 
cetta Light and (.second) Rachel Lantz ; Mar- 
garet married Austin Welchans; Benjamin 
married Catharine Beck; Maiy married 
George Goheen and (second) Rev. Uriah 
Conly ; Sarah married John C. Stear. 

Isaac McHeni-y, eldest sou of Maj. James 
and Elizabeth (Stutehel) McHenry, was the 
grandfather of Dr. Ralph F. McHenry. He 
was born July 4, 1797, in North Mahoning 
township, and in his early days followed fann- 
ing in his native township, assisting to clear 
and operate the home farm, also engaging in 
lumbering. Later he moved to Jefferson 
county, and made the first settlement at Ford- 
ham. Isaac McHenry was at Punxsutawuey 
when the site was a windfall and an Indian 
sugar camp. After his marriage he and his 
wife lived for a time at Fordham. on what is 
known as the old Bath farm at Whitesville, ^ 
thence removing to the vicinity of Frostburg, *. 
Jefferson count}', where Mr. IMcHenry was ' 
engaged in farming for over forty years. In 
1886. however, the farm was sold and the old 
couple moved — on Nov. 16th — with their son 
George W. to a farm which had been bought 
in East ^lahoniug township. Indiana county, 
where Isaac ^lellenry died Dec. 28. 1886. On 
Oct. 6, 1825, he married Catharine McClel- ; 
land, a native of Pennsylvania, whose parents | 
had come from Scotland to America at an i 
early day, and she sui'vived him. dying in 
:\Iarch, 1897. Mr. and Mrs. McHenry had 
children as follows: James W.. who married 
]\rary C. Horton; William P.. who married 
Julia A. Ruth: and George W. j 

George Washington JIcHenry. son of Isaac i 
and Catharine (McClelland) ^McHenry. was 
born March 3, 1830. at what is now 
Fordham. Jefferson Co.. Pa., and there 
resided until the removal of the family to 
near Frostburg, Jefferson county. Then he 
moved to East ^Mahoning township, Indiana 
county, taking his parents with him. in 1886, 
and they lived with him till they died. George 
W. McHenry sold his farm and is now living 
retired at Marion Center. Indiana Co., Pa., 
where he has had his home since 1905. Mr. 
McHenry married- Rachel M. Swisher, and 
'second"! Anna Rebecca Keck. The latter was 




/fk|//7%<^ 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



881 



born Jan. 26, 1843, near Perrysville, Jeffer- 
son county, and they became the parents of 
seven children, as follows: Rachel died at 
the age of thirteen years; Grant is engineer 
of the power plant at Lucerne, Pa. ; Laotta 
is the widow of W. L. Stewart, a lawyer, of 
Indiana, Pa.; Ralph F. is mentioned below; 
Lelia is deceased; Bessie is the wife of Rob- 
ert aicKee, of Horton ; Walter is a veterinary 
surgeon, of "Waverly, Iowa. 

Joseph Keek, the maternal grandfath,er of 
Dr. McHenry, was a native of Pennsylvania, 
of German descent. He was a sawyer by 
trade and followed that occupation in Jeffer- 
son county for some years, also devoting some 
attention to farming. He married Sophia 
Spare, and both died in Jefferson county. 

Until he was sixteen years of age Ralph F. 
McHenry resided on the home farm in Jeffer- 
son county, obtaining his early education in 
the schools of Frostburg. On coming to In- 
diana county he attended the Pickering Run 
school, and after academic work taught public 
school four years in Indiana county. Follow- 
ing this he entered in 1892 the Western Penn- 
sylvania Medical College, from which insti- 
tution he was graduated with his degree of 
M. D. March 21, 1895. For the ten years 
that followed he was engaged in practice at 
Marion Center, on JMarch 11, 1905, coming 
to Heilwood, where he has since had a suc- 
cessful professional career. He is a member 
of the Indiana County and State Medical 
Societies and of the American Medical As- 
sociation, is local surgeon for the Pennsyl-. 
vania Railroad Company, and has charge of 
the Heilwood hospital. Dr. McHenry has 
lone considerable studying along advanced 
lines, having taken a post-graduate general 
course in 1899 at the New York Polyclinic ; 
a post-graduate course in special diagnosis 
and general surgery, 1901-02; a course in 
general medicine and surgery at the New 
York Post Graduate JMedical School in 1907; 
and he did special work in surgery and diag- 
nosis at that institution in 1911. 

Fraternally the Doctor is a thirty-second 
degree Mason, being a member of the Scot- 
tish Rite ]\Iasons at Williamsport ; and Jaffa 
Temple. A. A. 0. N. M. S., of Altoona. Pa. 
He was one of the chai-ter members of Beth- 
any Commandery, No. 83, K. T., at DuBois, 
Pa"., and the Indiana lodge of B. P. 0. Elks. 
The Doctor has taken a very active interest 
in the welfare of the public schools of Indi- 
ana county, and for the last sixteen years has 
held the office of school director. 

On Dec. 25, 1890, Dr. McHenry was mar- 
ried to Gertrude J. Wilson, who was born at 



Plumville, in South Mahoning township, Indi- 
ana Co., Pa., March 7, 1869, daughter of Jo- 
seph M. and Rebecca (Neal) Wilson. Her 
father was born in South Mahoning township, 
her mother in East Mahoning townslnp, and 
tlley are now residents of Plumville; Mr. 
Wilson spent his active years in farming. He 
is a veteran of the Civil war. 

Dr. and ]\Irs. McHenry have had three chil- 
dren: Elizabeth, born in November, 1894, 
now deceased ; Joseph, liorn June 6, 1896, also 
deceased; and Ralph Wilson, born May 1, 
1910. The Doctor and his wife are members 
of the Presbyterian Church. 

CLARK J. CAMERON, D. D. S., has been 
engaged in tlie practice of dentistry at Cherry- 
tree, Indiana county, for over a quarter of a 
century, and has the reputation of being one 
of the most reliable men in his profession in 
this region. He was born in Green township, 
this county, Feb. 5, 1856, son of Daniel and 
JIargaret (Bartlebaugh) Cameron, both of 
whom were natives of Indiana county. 

Hugh Cameron, the Doctor's grandfather, 
was a native of Scotland. Settling in Indiana 
county at a very early day, he passed the 
remainder of his life here, engaged in farm- 
ing and lumbering. 

Daniel Cameron, father of Dr. Cameron, 
settled in Green township in the early fifties, 
purchasing the farm where his son Clark was 
born, and which is now owned by J. C. Leas- 
ure. There he farmed until his death, which 
occurred in February, 1885. He married 
Margaret Bartlebaugh. daughter of Matthias 
Bartlebaugh, a native of Indiana county who 
in his day was a prominent farmer of Green 
township. He was one of the founders of 
the local Presbyterian Church. Mr. Bartle- 
baugh lived to be ninety-six years old, and 
when ninety years old walked from his home 
to the borough of Indiana. 'Sirs. Margaret 
(Bartlebaugh) Cameron died early in the 
year 1858, the mother of four children, 
namely : Emmeline, who became the wife of 
John McFeaters, of Johnstown, Pa. ; Amanda, 
deceased, who was the wife of S. B. Leasui-e, 
of this county; ilarlin J., a resident of Al- 
bany, Oregon, engaged in the lumbering busi- 
ness; and Clark J. After the mother of 
these died Mr. Cameron married Rucilla Bar- 
tlebaugh, for his second wife, and for his 
third Cordelia McNeal. By the second union 
there were two children: Phoebe, wife of 
Robert Dunwiddie, a merchant in Cherryhill 
township ; and Lloyd, deceased. To the third 
marriage were born : Cordelia, who married 



882 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Isaac Work, both now deceased; Daniel, a 
resident of Homer City, this county; Sharp, 
a resident of Brownsville, Payette County, 
Pa., and Howard, who lives at Braddoc'k, 
Pennsylvania. 

Clark J. Cameron, youngest child of Daniel 
and Margaret (Bartlebaugh) Cameron, ob- 
tained his early education in public school 
m Green township, where he followed farm- 
ing in his youth and young manhood. In 
1884 he entered the Philadelphia Dental Col- 
lege to prepare for his chosen calling, was 
graduated from that institution in 1885, and 
immediately thereafter commenced practice 
in Indiana county, first locating at Cookport. 
The same year, 1885, he moved to Cherry- 
tree, where he has since been in active prac- 
tice, having built up a large and steadily 
widening patronage. In 1908 he took a spe- 
cial course in the treatment of teeth and 
bridge and crown work in the Peeso School 
at Philadelphia, and he has always made it 
a point to keep abreast of the times in his 
ideas and practice, a fact which has been 
thoroughly appreciated by his patrons in and 
around Cherrytree. 

Dr. Cameron has taken a special interest in 
the welfare of the public schools in Cherry- 
tree and is at present serving as school direc- 
tor, being also secretary of the board. He has 
been a member of the borough council, and 
highly public-spirited in advocating and en- 
couraging all projects for the advancement 
of the place, being connected with the Cherrv- 
tree Electric Heat. Light & Power Compaiiv 
as secretary, treasurer and member of the 
board of directors; and he is vice president 
of the Cherrytree Water Company. He is 
well known in the fraternities, being a promi- 
nent member of Cherrytree Lodge, No. 417, 
I. 0. 0. F., of which he is chaplain and treas- 
urer; a member of Susquehanna Lodge, No. 
31, A. 0. v. W., of which he is financier ; and 
a member of Indiana Lodge, Royal Arcanum. 

On Feb. 19, 1885, Dr. Cameron was mar- 
ried to Alice Maria Thompson, who was born 
in Rayne township, this county, daughter of 
William and Caroline (Shields") Thompson, 
both of whom were born in Indiana county, 
and both are now deceased. They were fann- 
ing people. Jlr. and Mrs. Thompson had a 
family of eight children: Amanda, wife of 
James M. Martin, living at Mount Washing- 
ton, Pa. ; Martha, wife of Dr. Park, of Marion 
Center, Indiana county; Silas W., a resident 
of Springfield, Ohio: Mary, who married 
Moorhead Coleman, of Indiana, both now de- 
ceased; Alice M., Mrs. Cameron; Harry V., 



a resident of Alberta, Canada; Emma, wife 
of James Moore, of Indiana county; and one 
that died in infancy. 

Four children have been born to Dr. and 
Mrs. Cameron: Gertrude Gay; Guilford 
Thompson and Jlartha Slargaret, twins; and 
Alice Imogene. The Doctor and his family 
are members of the Presbyterian Church at 
Cherrytree, and he has been quite active in 
its work, at present serving as elder. 

WILLIAM McQUAID FAIR is known as 
one of the most progressive dairymen in 
Center township, Indiana count.v, where he 
has been engaged in agi-icultural pursuits 
all his life. He belongs to an old family of 
the county, his great-grandfather, Peter Fair, 
having been one of the hardy pioneers who 
settled here in the early days. He was a 
scout and spy during the French and Indian 
war. 

William Fair, son of Peter, was born in 
Indiana county. He became the owner of a 
farm in Blacklick township upon which he 
lived and died. He married Mary Cribbs, 
of Indiana county, and the.v became the 
parents of the following children: Peter 
Cribbs ; Mary Jane, wife of W. Bell; Sus- 
anna, wife of J. Bell; Elizabeth, wife of 
Samuel Doty; Sarah, wife of Abraham 
Mikesell; Julia, wife of C. Mikesell; Henry, 
who married Frances Gilger and (second") 
Augusta Rodgers; and William, who married 
Hettie Willoer. 

Peter Cribbs Fair, son of William, received 
his education in the subscription and free 
schools of the home district, but meantime 
he had to assist his father with the work on 
the farm, which was extremel.v laborious in 
those days. So although the school teniis 
were short he did not attend every day. 
However, he was a diligent student, and he 
managed to acquire enough schooling to fit 
himself for teaching, which profession he fol- 
lowed for twenty years during the winter 
season. The rest of the year he was engaged 
in farming. For a time he worked on a farm 
in Blacklick township, later buying the Hugh 
McClaren farm, in Center township, which 
comprised 120 acres, and there he lived to the 
end of his da.vs. prospering in his own inter- 
ests and becoming closel.v a.ssoeiated with lo- 
cal affairs, political and social. He not only 
improved his home place, but was able to ac- 
quire other property, at one time owning about 
throe hundred acres. He was independent in 
politics, having progressive ideas in that re- 
spect as in everything which engaged his at- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



883 



tention, was public-spirited in advocating and 
supporting every movement for the welfare 
of the community, was a prominent member 
of the Grange, and in fraternal connection a 
member of Blairsville Lodge, P. & A. M. He 
was a good conversationalist, and an interest- 
ing and forcible public speaker, his intelligent 
and broad-minded views winning him the re- 
spect and confidence of all who came in con- 
tact with him. He was originally a member 
of the Lutheran Church, later joining the M. 
E. Church at Homer City. When a young 
man Mr. Fair married Sarah Young, by whom 
he had two children: Louisa, who married 
Robert Wilson and (second) Jesse Long, and 
Helen, who died young. The mother died 
aged about forty-three years, and is buried 
in the Homer City cemetery. Mr. Fair's sec- 
ond marriage, to Martha Jane Doty, daugh- 
ter of Nathaniel and Margaret (Reed) Doty, 
of Westmoreland county, Pa., took place in 
Westmoreland County. Mrs. Fair still lives 
on the homestead with her son William. Mr. 
Fair died June 16, 1903. 

William McQuaid Pair, only child of Peter 
C. and Martha J. (Doty) Fair, was born July 
27, 1876, on the farm in Center township 
where he now lives, and was reared there. He 
was educated in the locality, being given ex- 
cellent common school advantages, and from 
boyhood was his father's assistant with the 
work on the home place, becoming thoroughly 
familiar with farm work under an able in- 
structor. After his father's death he assumed 
charge of the farm as owner, and has since 
been engaged in general farming and dairy- 
ing. He began to make a specialty of dairy- 
ing a number of years ago. and has been very 
successful in that line, in which he has profit- 
ably adopted the most up-to-date methods. 
In 1905 he built a silo, and he has other mod- 
ern facilities for the care of his stock and 
product which stamp him as a wide-awake 
dairyman, thoroughly alive to the advantages 
of hygienic surroundings and scientific meth- 
ods. He has a valuable herd of high-grade 
Holsteins. . His product is shipped to Pitts- 
burg. He is energetic and reliable in every- 
thing he undertakes, being considered one of 
the most substantial men of his township, and 
he has served his fellow citizens as school di- 
rector, giving eminently satisfactory service 
in that capacity. He is a Democrat in poli- 
tics and takes a keen interest in the welfare 
of his party; he has served on the board of 
elections. 

Mr. Fair was married Dee. 6, 1903, to 
Laura Stair, of Center township, daughter of 



Michael and Jennie E. (Keener) Stair, and 
they have had eight children: Gail, Hazel, 
Margaret (who died in infancy), Edna May, 
Roxie, Viola, Margaret Louise, and Paul Mc- 
Quaid (who died in infancy Oct. 17, 1912). 

WILLIAM W. BRILHART, who has been 
in business as a .jeweler and optician at In- 
diana since 1880, was born in East JMahoning 
township, Indiana county, Feb. 25, 1847, son 
of Jacob Brilhart and grandson of John Bril- 
hart. The latter was born in the Shenandoah 
valley, in Virginia, whence he came to In- 
diana county. Pa., in 1820, settling on a 
tract of 300 acres in East Mahoning township. 
He married Catherine Hufif, who was from 
near Baltimore, Md. They died in East Ma- 
honing township. 

Jacob Brilhart, son of John, was born in 
1802 in Virginia, where he passed his early 
life, being eighteen years old when he came 
to Indiana county with his parents. He was 
a gunsmith by trade, and found consider- 
able to do at his new home making steel traps 
for trappers. He succeeded his father on the 
homestead, where he continued to reside to 
the close of his long life, dying there in 
1884. He married Mary Braugher, of In- 
diana county, who was born in 1815, and 
died on the home farm in 1875. Mr. and Mrs. 
Brilhart were devout Presbyterians in relig- 
ious faith. He was a Democrat before the 
Civil war, after which he supported the Re- 
publican party. He served as postmaster at 
Mahoning for many years, and was one of 
the best known men in his locality. To him 
and his wife were born the following chil- 
dren : Caroline, Mrs. Peter Beer, of near Du- 
Bois, Pa. : Jonah H., who died in Indiana ; J. 
Clark, of Grant township, Indiana county, 
who served during the Civil war in the 206th 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Regiment ; Abraham 
H., of Grant township; John A., of Scottdale, 
Pa. ; and Amanda, Mrs. L. C. Spicker, of the 
eastern shore of Maryland. 

William W. Brilhart spent the first few 
yeai-s of his life on the home farm, but he 
was only a boy when the family moved to 
Georgeville, this county, and he received his 
education in the local schools. In the fall 
of 1863 he enlisted in Company F, 105th 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, for three 
years or during the war, serving under Capt. 
William Kimkle and Colonel Miller, in Han- 
cock's 2d Corps, Army of the Potomac. He 
took part in the following battles : Culpeper, 
Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, 
North Anna River, Cold Harbor, Petereburg, 



884 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Hatcher's Run, and Appomattox, and was 
present when Lee gave his sword to Grant. 
He was mustered oiit near Pittsburg in July, 
1865, and returning home applied himself to 
learning the business of jeweler, at which 
he has ever since been engaged. He spent 
several years in Clarion eountj% in 1880 mov- 
ing to the borough of Indiana, where he has 
lived and worked up to the present time. He 
has established a steady patronage in his line, 
and has acquired a reputation for honorable 
dealing as a jeweler, and for skill in the opti- 
cal branch, which holds all his patrons. As 
a citizen he is highly esteemed for his sub- 
■ stantial worth. He is a member of the Chris- 
tian Church, and belongs to Post No. 28. G. 
A. R. In politics he is a Republican. 

In 1873 Mr. Brilhart was married to Anna 
C. Galbraith, of Indiana county, daughter of 
former sheriff J. C. Galbraith, and they have 
three children: Geer E., a jeweler, of Pitts- 
burg; Percy W., a civil engineer, now in Van- 
couver, B. C. ; and William, an optii-ian. who 
lives at Indiana with his parents. 

MILTON SAMUEL BELL, proprietor of 
the general mercantile business at Blackliek, 
Indiana county, conducted under the name of 
J. H. Bell Company, is a representative 
of a family which has been resident in this 
part of Pennsylvania continuously since Colo- 
nial times. John Bell, his great-grandfather, 
made his home in Westmoreland county. He 
married Martha Kilcrearn, and their children 
were: John, Walter, James, Jane, Elizabeth 
and Martha. 

John Bell, son of John and Martha (Kil- 
crearn) Bell, also lived in Westmoreland 
county, where he followed farming all his 
life. He and his wife Rebecca (Hanson) be- 
came the parents of ten children, namely: 
John, James Hanson, Samuel M., Alfred M., 
Jlargaret M.. Martha K., Sarah, Elizabeth, 
Mai-y and Aligara. 

James Hanson Bell, son of John and Re- 
becca (Hanson) Bell, was born Feb. 2*^. 1826, 
on a farm in Derry township, Westmoreland 
county. He was given an excellent educa- 
tion, attending public school and the academy 
at Blairsville, and having decided to enter 
professional life read medicine with Dr. J. 
W. Blackburn, of Derry township, Westmore- 
land county. Later he attended lectures at 
Jefferson Medical College. Pliiladelphia. and 
a medical college in Vermont, from whicli 
latter institution he was graduated in 18.'i2. 
He began the practice of his cliosen profession 
at Clarksburg. Indiana Co., Pa., where he 



continued for four j'ears, at the end of that 
period moving to Elder's Ridge, same county, 
practicing there the next five years. His next 
change was to Butler county, Pa., where he 
also became engaged in the drug business, 
which he sold out on account of ill health 
in the spring of 1868, returning then to In- 
diana count.y. Locating at Blackliek, he 
opened a general mercantile business which 
has ever since lieen carried on under the name 
of J. H. Bell Company, and in which he was 
interested until his death. A man of sterling 
honesty and irreproachable standards, he also 
had the commercial instinct which made him 
successful in the management of his business, 
and his courteous bearing, natui-al disposi- 
tion to oblige and intelligent comprehension 
of the needs of his patrons made his establish- 
ment one of the most popular in this part of 
the county. In 1868, under President John- 
son, he was appointed postmaster, and held 
that office continuously for nuiny years. He 
took a deep interest in all that concerned the 
town of liis adoption, her people and institu- 
tions, being a highly useful citizen in every 
sense. He died in Blackliek in September, 
1896, and is buried in Blairsville cemetery. 

On Aug. 31, 1852, Dr. Bell maii-ied Mary 
Doty, who was born Jan. 5, 1827, in Indiana 
county, and survived him, dying April 18. 
1906, at the age of sevent.v-nine ; she is buried 
in Blairsville cemetery. Mrs. Bell was a de- 
scendant of one of the pa.ssengers of the 
"Mayflower," having been a daughter of 
Gillis M. and Jane (Dixdn) Doty. She and 
her husband had a family of seven children: 
Rebecca Jane, born Sept. 8. 1854, died Sept. 
22, 1865 : Gillis Doty, born Jan. 24. 1857, is 
a hardware merchant in Cleveland. Ohio; 
John Hunter, born April 14, 1859, died in 
1909 ; James Hanson, born Oct. 5. 1861. died 
in 1862: Sarah Elizabeth, born July 19. 1863. 
is unmarried : IMilton Samuel was born May 
12, 1869: Alfred Marks, bom Sept. 28, 1871. 
resides at Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Milton S. Bell obtained his education in the 
public schools of Burrell townsliip. When a 
boy he began to clerk in his father's store, 
and subsequently going out to Ohio clerked 
for about ten years with his bi-other in the 
hardware business. On his ri'turn to Black- 
lick, in 1897. he bought out the general mer- 
cantile business fi-om his father's estate and 
lias conducted it on his own account ever 
since, giving all his time and attention to the 
store. It has enjoyed undiminished popu- 
larity under his capable management. He 
has made extensive improvements in the ae- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



885 



eoiumodations, bringing the establishment up- 
to-date in equipment and convenient arrange- 
ment, and his genial personality and ready 
attention to the wants of his customers has 
kept the business up to the high standards set 
by his father. The store is the largest of the 
kind in Blacklick, and deservedly has a wide 
patronage from the town and adjacent ter- 
ritory. Mr. Bell was one of the organizers 
of the First National Bank of Blacklick, which 
he serves as director, and his public-spirited 
interest in the town has made him a sympa- 
thetic aid of every good movement for its ad- 
vancement and betterment. 

On June 27, 1902, Mr. Bell was married, 
at Cleveland, Ohio, to Jessie G. Bruce, a na- 
tive of that city, daughter of Charles Bruce. 
They have no children. Mr. and Mrs. Bell 
are members of the Christian Science Church, 
and both have been ardent admirers of the 
late Mrs, Eddy and her doctrines. Socially 
he is an Odd Fellow and Mason, belonging 
to the I. 0. 0. F. lodge at Blacklick, and to 
Halcyon Lodge, No. 498, F. & A. M., of Cleve- 
land, Ohio, and Thatcher Chapter, No. 101, 
Royal Arch Masons, of Cleveland. He is a 
stanch Republican, but takes no active part 
in politics. 

JOHN WIGGINS HENDERSON, late of 
Armstrong township, Indiana county, who 
died Jidy 4, 1907, was a native of Center 
township, this county, born Jan. 6, 1839. 

The Henderson family came to this section 
from Cumberland county. Pa., where Samuel 
and Elizabeth (Wiggins) Henderson, grand- 
parents of John Wiggins Henderson, lived. 
On their removal to Indiana county they set- 
tled in Center township, where they followed 
farming the rest of their lives. Their chil- 
dren were: Samuel, John, Brice, Margaret, 
Nancy and Sarah. 

John Henderson, born in Cumberland 
county, moved to Indiana coiinty and was 
engaged in farming and milling in Center 
township. Later he moved to Tunnelton, in 
Conemaugh township, this county, where he 
farmed for a time, and he subsequently re- 
sided in White township. He was interested 
in agricultural pursuits all his life. He died 
in 1871, at the age of sixty-nine years. His 
wife, Nancy (Wiggins), died near Saltsbiirg, 
in Conemaugh township. They had the fol- 
lowing children: Jane died unmarried in 
1900, aged seventy-six years; Samuel died in 
1898, at the age of seventy; Nancy married 
Thomas Wolverton (they were both blind), 
and had one child, Sarah Jane; Margaret 



died when three years old; Brice died when 
ten yeat-s old; William, now living at Oil 
City, Pa., married Margaret Lemon (who 
is deceased), and had one child, Nancy Jane; 
Sarah is the widow of Jolin JMcLaughlin, and 
resides in Philadelphia; John W. is men- 
tioned below; Maria died unmarried April 
17, 1870, aged twenty-seven years; Brice (2) 
married Anna W. Barker and now lives at 
Oil City. 

John W. Henderson was brought up like 
the ordinary farmer boy and received his 
education in the common schools of the home 
neighborhood. He was engaged in farm labor 
in his youth and early manhood, and also 
learned and followed the trade of tanner at 
Tannery village, in Armstrong township. Af- 
ter his marriage he settled on a tract of sixty- 
nine acres in that township, upon which he 
followed general farming for many years 
From 1891 until 1895 he was in business at 
Beaver Falls, Pa., where he had a grocery 
store, and he also lived in Pittsburg for four 
years; he was employed as caretaker at the 
free dispensary there during that period. He 
was actively interested in the public questions 
of his day, in early life upholding the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party, and later 
becoming a Prohibitionist. He served as 
school director in Armstrong township. Mr. 
Henderson was a member of the United Pres- 
byterian Church, served as elder of the church 
he attended in Pittsburg, and also held that 
office in the Crete Church in Center town- 
ship for many years. He met an accidental 
death, being thrown from a buggy and killed, 
at his farm in Armstrong township, July 4, 
1906. i'' J ' 

On April 14, 1864, Mr. Henderson married 
Elizabeth Clarissa MeCullough, member of 
a highly respected family of this section. She 
was born on the home farm in Armstrong 
township, Indiana county, received her edu- 
cation at the Hilltop school and select school 
in Jacksonville, and began teaching at Elder- 
ton, Armstrong county, when only fourteen 
years old. She continued there until she was 
twenty, teaching twenty-six days a month and 
receiving fifty cents for each pupil. After 
two terms in the Derry township (Westmore- 
land county) school and one term in Green 
township (Indiana county), she went to Iron- 
ton, Ohio, to assist her brother, who was prin- 
cipal of the school there, and then attended 
Saltsburg Academy for two terms under Prof. 
Albert Brown. Following this she taught in 
Young township (Indiana county) for two 
terms and at the Uncapher school in Arm- 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



strong township one term, studied two terms 
at the Jacksonville Academy and then re- 
sumed teaching, being engaged one term at 
the Hilltop school in Armstrong township 
and one term at No. 5 school in Oouemaugh 
township. Then she married in lS6i, and 
settled with her husband in Armstrong town- 
ship, of which she is a highly respected resi- 
dent. Mr. and Mrs. Henderson had children 
as follows: (1) Elmer Lynch, bom Jan. 17, 
1865, is now connected with the pottery busi- 
ness at Carlton, Ohio. He married :\Iillicent 
Rhoades, who died IMarch 28, 1893, the mother 
of two children, Roy Evan and Clara Ellen. 
He has since married (second) Luella A. 
Hard. (2) Naney Narcissa, born Jan. 14, 
1867, married J. M. Hawk, and resides at 
Beaver Falls, Pa. They have had children: 
Le Movne (deceased'), Meriam (deceased). 
Wan-en Clifford, Ravinond Perry and Clara 
Esther. (3) Clara Mary, born May 24, 1869. 
married Joseph Lytle I\ie6aughey, a resident 
of Armstrong township, this county. (4) 
William Price, born Oct. 12, 1871, died in 
1880. (5) Randal Wiggins, born Feb. 2, 
1874, graduated from the Pittsburg College 
of Pharmacy (Western University of Penn- 
sylvania^, and now has a drug store of his 
own at Avalon, Allegheny Co., Pa. He mar- 
ried Margaret Pierce. (6) Walter Lowry 
first became a druggist and then took up the 
study of medicine, graduating from the West- 
ern Pennsylvania :Medical College, Pittsburg, 
and he is now engaged in practice at East Me- 
Keesport. He married Vill« K. Fleeger. and 
they have two children. John Walter, born in 
June, 1906, and Annita Elizabeth, born Aug. 
20, 1910. 

The ileCullough family, to which IVIrs. 
John W. Henderson belongs, came to this 
country from Ireland. David :\IcCullough, 
her grandfather, was born on what is now 
the Samuel Stephens farm in Armstrong 
township, Indiana county, and died at Elder- 
ton. Armstrong county. He married Eliza- 
beth George, a native of Ireland, and they 
had the following children: Samuel, James. 
Martha, John, David (died young), David 
(2) rdied young), Jackson. William, David 
(3), Robert and Alexander. 

Samuel jMcCullough. father of Mrs. John 
W. Henderson, was born in 1813 in Arm- 
strong to^vnship. Indiana county, on what is 
now the Samuel Stephens farm, and later 
lived near Elderton, Armstrong county. By 
trade he was a tanner and harnessmaker, fol- 
lowing that line at Elderton for two years, 
and he also conducted a tannery on his farm, 



which is now owned by IMi-s. Henderson. He 
bought hides all over the county, tanning 
them and shipping the leather to Pittsburg, 
and was a well-known man in this section in 
his day, his various business ventures bring- 
ing him in touch with a large number of peo- 
ple. In politics he was a Democrat and dui-- 
iug Biichanan's administi-ation was appointed 
postmaster at Tannery village; the office has 
been abandoned since the establishment of the 
rural free delivery service. He also served 
as school director. i\Ir. McCullough died on 
his farm Dee. 23, 1875, and was buried in 
the cemetery of the West Union United Pres- 
byterian Church in Armstrong township. His 
wife, Martha (Wiggins), was born Nov. 20, 
1820, on what is now the Thomas Whatt farm, 
daughter of Andrew and Rebecca (Lji:le) 
Wiggins, and died in March, 1875, on the Mc- 
Cullough home place. She is buried in the 
same cemeterA- as her husband. Mrs. Hender- 
son and Andrew W. were their only children. 

AxDREw Wiggins ]\IcCullough, son of 
Samuel, was born April 13, 1839, in Arm- 
strong township, and there began his educa- 
tion at the Hilltop schoolhouse. Later he 
attended the academy at Jacksonville. Dur- 
ing the Civil war he enlisted in Company I, 
11th Pennsylvania Volunteers, under Cap- 
tain Coder, and served one year. Most of 
his earlier manhood was spent in teaching. 
He taught at Saltsburg and Pineflats, in In- 
diana county: at Ironton, Ohio, for three 
years being principal there ; at New Wilming- 
ton, Pa., college three years: at Salt.sburg 
again ; at Eldersridge, Indiana county, assist- 
ing Dr. Donaldson; at Belmont, Ohio, four 
years; and then came back to Anustrong 
township, Indiana county, and taught three 
years. Having studied theology-, he was or- 
dained a minister of the Lutheran Church in 
1866, and 1877 moved to Brushvalley. Indiana 
county, and became pastor of the Lutheran 
Church there. He died Feb. 10, 1913, at 
Homer City, this county. 

]Mr. McCullough married Siisan Simpson, 
of Eldersridge, in Young township. Indiana 
county, and they had the following children : 
Charles Clai-ence, Samuel Xoel, Frank (de- 
ceased), Ella Jane (married William Nevins, 
both deceased). Dial Lewis, Herbert, David 
Elmer, Jlargaret (married Herbert flyers), 
Herman and John. 

JOSEPH WIDDOWSON RANKIN, 

though one of the youngest of the group of 
wide-awake business men who have brought 
the Iwrough of Clymer, within the compara- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



887 



lively brief period of its existence, to a fore- 
most position as a business center in Indiana 
county, has been one of the most active and 
most successful in achieving results of the 
greatest importance to the general welfare. 
His principal interests are in the lumber busi- 
ness, but he has numerous other connections 
which make his influence felt in many things 
vital to the advancement of this section. Mr. 
Rankin was born Feb. 16, 1880, on a farm 
near the town of Hillsdale, in Montgomery 
township, Indiana county. 

William Rankin, father of Joseph W. Ran- 
kin, was also born in ilontgomery township, 
and was a son of Hugh R. Rankin, a native 
of Hillsdale, Indiana county. In early life he 
engaged in the lumber business, which he con- 
tinued to follow for many years, later set- 
tling on a farm in Montgomery township 
which he cultivated for a considerable period, 
being there thirty years. Thence he moved 
to Green township, where he and his wife 
still have their home at Purchase Line. He 
mari'ied Nancy F. Buterbaugh, who was born 
in Grant township, Indiana county, daughter 
of Frederick Buterbaugh, who at one time 
served as commissioner of Indiana county. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rankin had the following chil- 
dren: Margaret, who is the wife of D. H. 
Tomb, a prominent lawyer of Indiana, Pa.; 
John H., deceased; F. C, deceased; Dean S., 
who lives on the old home place ; Ruth, who 
died in infancy; and Joseph Widdowson. 

Joseph Widdowson Rankin obtained his 
education in the country schools in his native 
township. Later he attended a commercial 
school in Detroit. His first work was on a 
farm, but for some years after giving up agri- 
cultural work he was employed as a traveling 
salesman, visiting almost every State in the 
Union during the five years he was thus en- 
gaged. He also saw considerable of South 
America during that period. Returning to 
his native county he settled at Clymer, which 
was then in its infancy, and few men have 
had more to do with founding its business 
enterprises, establishing its government upon 
a modern basis and promoting its develop- 
ment along the most approved modern lines. 
He assisted in the organization of the bor- 
ough, has held nearly all of the borough offi- 
ces, and is at present serving as treasurer, 
in which position his ability and excellent 
management are fully appi-eciated. Upon 
settling here he embarked in the lumber busi- 
ness, later adding the coal business to the 
original line, and besides this independent 
venture, which he carries on under the name 



of Joseph W. Rankin, he is interested in the 
Dixon Run Lumber Company, of which he 
is the secretary. He is also associated with 
two other most important concerns in the 
borough — the Citizens' Water Company, of 
which he is president, and the Cljnner Na- 
tional Bank, in which he liolds stock, and 
of which he was formerly vice president. Mr. 
Rankin holds membership in the Clymer lodge 
of the I. 0. 0. F. and in Indiana Lodge, B. 
P. 0. Elks. 

On July 12, 1910, Mr. Rankin married Ella 
i\l. Evans, daughter of John E. and Ellen M. 
(Allen) Evans; all of her surviving brothers 
and sisters live in Clymer. Mr. and Mrs. 
Rankin have a beautiful home in the borough. 

JAMES WARRICK, deceased, who for 
many years was engaged in the contracting 
business in Indiana, where he is remembered 
as the builder of the city jail, Mrs. Reeder's 
house, the Lutheran church, Mr. Courtney's 
residence, the Wissell home, and other struc- 
tures, was born in 1831 in Westmoreland 
county, Pa., where were born also his two 
brothers, George and Charles, and his sister, 
Rachel. 

Mr. Warrick was reared in his native county 
and there attended public school, following 
which he learned the trade of brick mason 
with his brother George. He came to Indiana 
before his marriage, and was here married 
Jan. 15, 1880, to Margaret Nealer, who was 
bprn at New Bethlehem, Clarion Co., Pa., 
Aug. 16, 1862, went to the schools of Clarion 
county, and at the age of sixteen years was 
brought to Indiana by her parents, Henry 
and Margaret (Ziegler) Nealer. ]Mr. and 
Mrs. Warrick went to housekeeping on 
Church street until he erected a home at No. 
280 Philadelphia street, and at this home he 
died Oct. 16, 1890, at which time he was one 
of the leading contractors of the city. He 
was a Democrat in his political views. Mr. 
and Mrs. Warrick had four children : Minnie, 
who is deceased ; Nevada, who married George 
Lydick, and died leaving one daughter, 
Frances Charlotte; and Virginia and John, 
twins, who died young. 

The parents of Mrs. Warrick were of Ger- 
man birth, and were married in the Father- 
land, one child being born to them there who 
died on the ocean while they were making 
the journey to this country. Mr. Nealer, a 
farmer, first settled in Clarion county, but 
subsequently moved to Indiana county, but 
his death occurred at Brady, in the former 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



county, whither he had removed some time 
before. His wife passed away at New Bethle- 
hem. They had the following children : The 
one who died at sea; Mrs. Warrick; Annie, 
who married Henry Steving, of Indiana ; 
Catherine, who died unmarried; Paul, of 
East Brady, Pa. ; and Mary, who died un- 
married. 

ARMOR P. CLARK, of West Wheatfield 
township, Indiana county, a leading farmer 
in his section, Avas born Nov. 2, 1867, on the 
farm he now owns and occupies. He is of 
Irish extraction, his paternal grandfather 
having been a native of Ireland, in which 
country he spent all his life. 

Samuel Clark, father of Armor P. Clark, 
was born in 1815 in Ireland and came to 
America when a young man. For some time 
he lived in Pittsburg, Pa., and that vicinity, 
then coming to Indiana county. For a few 
years he followed farming at Homer City, 
was afterward a resident of East Wheatfield 
township for some time, and then bought the 
Wheary farm in West Wheatfield township, 
a tract of 106 acres, most of which he had 
cleared and under cultivation at the time of 
his death. He put up buildings, and improved 
the property in many ways, being a thrifty, 
industrious man, one who was respected by 
his neighbors and held the confidence of all 
his fellow citizens. He died May 10, 1880, at 
the age of sixty-five years, and was buried in 
the Bethel cemetery in West Wheatfield town- 
ship. His wife, Jane (Oliver), also a native 
of Ireland, born March 16, 1825, came to 
America when sixteen years old, and died 
March 11, 1900. Mr. and Mrs. Clark had a 
large family : Thomas, James, John, Samuel, 
Robert, Armor P., Mary (died young), Hester 
(married J. R. Dick and Philip Rhen), Dassa 
(married Samuel Coleman), Viola (man-ied 
Charles Duncan), Jennie (married John 
Auld) and Clara (married Lloyd Penrose). 

Armor P. Clark received his education in 
the public schools of his native township. He 
was only a youth of thirteen when his father 
died, and he took hold of the work and re- 
mained on the farm, carrying it on for his 
mother after he was old enough. After her 
death, in 1900, he bought out the other heirs' 
interest in the place, becoming the sole owner, 
and he has devoted himself to general farming 
and stock raising ever since. This farm lies 
along the Clay pike about four miles from 
New Florence. There is a fine residence on 
the place, built in 1895, and the house and 
surroundings are carefully kept up in every 



respect, Mr. Clark taking great pride in hav- 
ing his home neat and attractive, and its ap- 
pearance indicates the prosperity and intelli- 
gent management for which Mr. Clark has 
justlj' won a high reputation. 

On Dec. 20, 1898, Mr. Clark married Alpha 
M. Mack, daughter of R. H. Mack, of East 
Wheatfield township. She died April 7, 1905, 
and is buried in Bethel cemetery. Four chil- 
dren were born to this union : Virginia, Paul, 
Imogene and Samuel. 

Mr. Clark is a member of the United Presby- 
terian Church at Bethel. In political connec- 
tion he is a Republican. 

JOHN M. CARSON, postmaster at Homer 
City, Indiana county, is a native of that 
town, born July 27, 1868. His grandfather, 
John Carson, was born in Perry county, Pa., 
where he grew to manhood. His father died 
in middle life, leaving a family. John, one of 
the sons, came to Indiana county, where his 
brothers Alexander and William settled, also 
his sisters Susan and Jane. He learned the 
trade of cooper in Peny county, but when 
he located in Center township, Indiana county, 
he rented a farm, and followed farming all 
the remainder of his life. He died on the 
farm at the age of seventy years. He was 
twice married, the second time to Elizabeth 
Steel, who was a native of Franklin county, 
daughter of Matthew Steel. She lived to the 
ripe age of ninety-two years. She was the 
mother of eight children: Maiy, who died 
unmarried ; James, deceased ; Matthew, de- 
ceased ; John, deceased ; William, deceased ; 
Estella, deceased; Robert P.; and Thomas, 
also deceased. 

Robert P. Carson, father of John M. Car- 
son, was born in Center township April 15, 
18-35, and educated in the public schools 
there. Although he worked on the farm until 
seventeen years old he also learned the shoe- 
maker's trade, in 1856 locating in Homer 
City and following his trade. He has been in 
business there continuously for the past fifty- 
six years and is still actively engaged, being 
one of the best-known men in the borough, 
highly respected for his honest, industrious 
career. He has always been a good citizen and 
deeply interested in the welfare of his town. 
He cast his first vote for Lincoln and has been 
a stanch Republican since. Mr. Carson was 
married in Homer City to Mary C. Foust, who 
was born in Somerset county. Pa. Mr. and 
Mi-s. Carson attend the ]\T. E. Church. They 
are the parents of ten children : Albert ; Kate, 
wlio married Robert E. Roberts; Cora, who 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



died young; John M. ; Loie Ellen, who mar- 
ried Henry E. Phillips; Annie, married to 
John F. Barkley ; Edgar D. ; Gertrude, mar- 
ried to Bruce D. Kramer ; George H. ; and 
Mary Estella, married to Henry A. Trusal. 

John M. Carson attended public school in 
Homer City. At an early age he started out 
to make his own way, finding his first employ- 
ment in the planing mills of J. M. Guthrie & 
Co., of Homer City, where he remained twelve 
years, during half of which time he was fore- 
man. His next position was with the Prairie 
State Incubator Companj', of Homer City, by 
which concern he was employed for a period 
of eleven years, five of. which he was foreman 
of the plant. On Nov. 4, 1903, under the ad- 
ministration of President Roosevelt, he was 
appointed postmaster at Homer City, suc- 
ceeding B. B. McConnaughtJ^ The office was 
at that time in the fourth class. On Feb. 1, 
1906, it was raised to third class, and on Jan. 
3, 1910, to second class, being the first office 
in the county raised to second class within 
such a short period. Mr. Carson was reap- 
pointed by Roosevelt, and again under Taft, 
having held his position continuously since he 
first assumed its duties. His business-like 
management and the satisfactory service he 
has given to his fellow citizens have won him 
their respect and a well-deserved reputation 
for ability and efficiency. He is a member of 
the Postmasters' Association. For eight terms 
he has been a member of the Homer City 
school board, on which he is still serving, and 
has been president the last two years. He is 
a leading member of the M. E. Church, in 
which he holds the office of trustee. Socially 
he belongs to I. 0. 0. F. Lodge, No. 41, at 
Homer City, and to Indiana- Lodge, No. 313, 
F. & A. M. 

In 1891 Mr. Carson married at Homer City 
Elizabeth Sloan, and they have three chil- 
dren: Martha, who is a clerk in the post- 
office; Jaj', and Robert. 

WILLIAM DUNN GATES, M. D., has a 
large practice in and around the borough of 
Indiana, where he has been located since 
1898. He is a native of Bradford county, Pa., 
born Oct. 24, 1865, at Springfield, where his 
father, William Gates, was also born. Seth 
Gates, his grandfather, was born in one of the 
New England States, presumably Connecticut, 
and was a farmer during the greater part of 
his life. He was a descendant of the well- 
known General Gates, of Revolutionary fame. 



His wife, whose maiden name was Greene, 
was a descendant of the famous Gen. Nathan- 
ael Greene. 

William Gates, the Doctor's father, was a 
farmer and stock dealer. He married Eliza- 
beth Dunn, and they were the parents of two 
children : William Dunn and Adelia, the lat- 
ter the wife of Lewis Chatham. Mr. Gates 
died in 1878, his wife surviving until March, 
1909. They were members of the M. E. 
Church. 

William Dunn Gates attended district school 
at Springfield and the elementary and high 
school at Troy, Bradford county. His father 
dying when he was quite young, it became 
necessary for him to rely upon himself at an 
unusually early age, but he was ambitious to 
become a professional man and let no obsta- 
cles stand in the way of an education. He 
was industrious and economical, as well as 
studious, and he applied his hand earned 
savings to this end, attending school as far 
as his means would permit. The law first at- 
tracted him, and he read for a short time along 
that line, but soon abandoned it for the study 
of medicine. After reading under Dr. H. D. 
LaPlant, of Sayre, Bradford Co., Pa., he en- 
tered Hahnemann Medical College, at Phila- 
delphia, where he completed the four years' 
course, graduating in 1898. The same year 
he began practice at Indiana, where he has 
since found his field of labor. He has built 
up a large practice, being one of the busiest 
general practitioners in this region, and be- 
sides acts as examiner for the Standard Mu- 
tual Life Insurance Company of North 
America and for the Pension Life Insurance 
Company of Pittsburg. For ten years he was 
surgeon for the Joseph Horton and Graceton 
Coal and Coke Companies, and he served a 
term of three years as coroner of Indiana 
county. He is a member of the Indiana 
County Medical Society and of the Indiana 
Physicians' Protective Society, and also be- 
longs to the Pennsylvania State Homeopathic 
Society, to the Clinical Congress of Surgeons 
of North America, and to the National Medi- 
cal Association. Fraternally he belongs to the 
I. 0. 0. F. and the B. P. 0. Elks at Indiana. 
He is a Republican in his political views, and 
in religious connection a member of the M. E. 
Church. 

On Oct. 23, 1902, Dr. Gates married Carrie 
Baldwin, of Sayre, Pa., and they had one 
child, Ruth A. His second marriage, on Nov. 



890 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



12, 1912, was to Carrie Burnham Hill, of 
Indiana, Pennsylvania. 

HARRY E. LYDICK, who was engaged in 
the drug business in the borough of Clymer, 
Indiana county, for several years, was born 
April 17, 1873, in Cherryhill township, and 
belongs to one of the oldest families of this 
region. 

John Lydiek, his great-great-grandfather, 
the founder of the family in this country, was 
a native of Holland. On coming to America 
he first settled at Hannastown, AYestmorelaud 
Co., Pa., where he engaged in farming. In the 
year 1760 he brought his family to Indiana 
county, settling in what is now Cherryhill 
township, where they built a fort, part of 
which is still standing. The following year 
the hostility of the Indians drove them back 
into AYestmorelaud county, where they re- 
mained for seven years before again ventur- 
ing to live at their new home. AYhen they 
returned they settled permanently in Cherry- 
hill township, on the fanu which is still in 
the family, and here John Lydiek died at an 
advanced age. He served in the Revolution- 
ary war. One of his descendants is Harry S. 
Lydiek, of Pittsburg, deputy United States 
district attorney, who is a second cousin of 
Harry E. Lydiek. 

Jacob Lj-dick, son of John, grew to man- 
hood in Cherryhill township, where he lived 
and died. He reached the ripe old age of 
ninety-four years. 

Patrick Lydiek, son of Jacob, also passed 
his entire life in Cherryhill township. Like 
his father and grandfather he lived to be very 
old. His family consisted of three children, 
all now deceased. 

Russell Lydiek, son of Patrick, was born 
March 20, 1834, in Cherryhill township, on 
the farm where his great-grandfather had set- 
tled, and farmed there all his life, dying on 
that place Jan. 18. 1900. He married Nannie 
Martin, who was born in Cherryhill township 
March 12, 1851, and to them were born five 
children, three sons and two daughters, 
namely : William, the eldest, resides on the 
old family homestead in Cherryhill township; 
Elizabeth is the wife of Levi Ilouck, of On- 
berg, Indiana county; Harry E. is mentioned 
below ; John P. also resides on the old home 
place, he and his brother William cultivating 
the property; Ella M. is the wife of Earl 
Long, and resides in the boroiigh of Indiana. 
Airs. Lydiek died May 20, 1882. 

William Martin, father of Mrs. Nannie 
(Martin) Lydiek, was born in February, 1819, 



in Cherryhill township, son of John Martin, 
a native of Ireland, who on coining from that 
country to the United States settled in that 
township and engaged in farming there. His 
son William also followed that occupation, and 
both died in Cherryhill township. William 
Martin married Martha MacCauley, who was 
born in County Donegal, Ireland, and was 
only three years old when her parents came 
to America. The family lived first on Long 
Island, and then came to Ax-mstrong county. 
Pa., where they made a permanent settlement. 
William and Martha (ilacCauley ) Martin had 
a family of nine children, two of whom sur- 
vive : John, who lives at Tyrone, Pa.; and 
George, living at Indiana, Pennsylvania. 

Harry E. Lydiek obtained his schooling in 
Cherryhill township. Meantime he began 
farming, but when eighteen he began to teach 
school there, being thus engaged in his home 
township for seven years and later in Rayne 
township, this county, for one year. Taking 
up the study of pharmacy, first under Dr. 
Stevens, he engaged in the drug business after 
the completion of his course, establishing his 
store at Clymer in 1906. That was in the 
early days of the borough, and he assisted in 
organizing the town. His business expanded 
steadily with its growth, and he built up a 
prosperous trade, which continued on the ■ 
increase until he disposed of his store recentl.v. 
Mr. Lydiek is a member of Indiana Lodge, No. 
346, I. 0. 0. F. 

On Aug. 24, 1909, Mr. Lydiek married 
Esther Delmer, the ceremony taking place at 
Niagara Falls, N. Y. She is a native of Houtz- 
dale, Clearfield Co., Pa., born April 20, 1889, 
daughter of Enoch and Mary (McCabe) Del- 
mei-, natives of England, the father born in 
Loudon, the mother in the County of Durham. 
They settled early at JIoutzdale,"and Mr. Del- 
mer engaged in mining. He and his wife now 
live in Cambria county, Pa. They have had 
the following children: Priscilla, wife of 
Clarence Getty, of Houtzdale. Pa.: Alasgie, 
deceased, wife of David Davis, of Scrantou, 
Pa. • I\Iar.v, wife of Frank Kittleberger. of 
Clearfield, Pa.; John, living at home; Esther, 
Mrs. Lydiek; and James, Nan, George, Nellie 
and William, all at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lydiek have had one child, 
Russell, who was born Jan. 29, 1911. 

EBENEZER W. SMITH has been leading 
a somewhat retired life since 1904, when he 
moved to the borough of Cherrytree, giving 
up farming, to which he had previously de- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



891 



voted all his time. However, he has not relin- 
quished all active connection with the business 
world, serving as president of the National 
Bank of Cherrytree, with which institution he 
has been associated for several years. Born 
in Green township, this county, Sept. 18, 1842, 
he belongs to a family which has been settled 
there for almost a century. 

Richard W. Smith, his grandfather, was a 
native of New Jersey, born Oct. 19, 1768, near 
Newark. When a young man, in 1788, he 
settled in Marion county, Va. (now West Vir- 
ginia), and engaged in lumbering and farm- 
ing, also buying and selling cattle and stock.. 
In 1824 he moved to Indiana county, Pa., his 
family following him to this section in 1828. 
They lived in Green township, where he 
bought land and prospered, adding to his pos- 
sessions until he owned one thousand acres. 
At first the nearest postoffice was Indiana, 
Diamondville being established later. Richard 
W. Smith remained on his farm there until 
his death. He married Elizabeth Walker, who 
was a native of Greene county. Pa., born Oct. 
1, 1779. 

Ebenezer W. Smith, son of Richard W. and 
Elizabeth (Walker) Smith, was born Dec. 20, 
1805, in Marion county, Va., and was the eldest 
child of his parents. He came with his par- 
ents to Indiana county, and after the death 
of his father continued to carry on farming 
on the old place, where he passed the rest of 
his life. He died Dec. 15, 1876. Before his 
death he divided his tract of land among his 
children, who settled on the portions given 
them. He was married, Sept. 8, 1831, in West 
Virginia, to Lovina Hayhui*st, who survived 
him, dying June 2, 1884. They became the 
parents of five children, four sons and one 
daughter, namely : Richard, born Nov. 13, 
1832, was a resident of Indiana county, and 
is deceased; Benjamin, born July 2, 1834, 
died in 1912 ; Sarah B., born Feb. 2, 1837, is 
the wife of William Hou.sehold, and they live 
in Westmoreland county, Pa. ; Ebenezer W. is 
mentioned below ; John B., born Oct. 1, 1848, 
is a resident of Clarksburg, West Virginia. 

Benjamin Hayhurst, father of Mrs. Lovina 
(Hayhurst) Smith, was a native of West Vir- 
ginia, and there passed all his life, settling in 
Marion county. He came from a long-lived 
race and himself lived to be ninety-nine years 
of age, and his father reached the age of 107 
years. Benjamin Hayhurst -served as a soldier 
during the Llexican war. 

Ebenezer W. Smith, son of Ebenezer W. and 
Lovina (Hayhurst) Smith, spent his boyhood 
days on the farm in Green township and there 



attended public school. Farming was his oc- 
cupation from the time he began work, and 
he remained on the old Smith farm in Green 
township until about eight years ago, in 1904 
abandoning active agricultural work and mov- 
ing in to Cherrytree. In connection with his 
farm work Mr. Smith also carried on lumber- 
ing to some extent. He has long been an 
official of the National Bank of Cherrytree, 
and is now the executive head of that institu- 
tion, holding a substantial and influential 
position among the recognized leaders in finan- 
cial circles in the community. He was one of 
the organizers of the County National Bank 
of Punxsutawney, Pa., which he is now serv- 
ing as a director, and is a stockholder in the 
Savings & Trust Company, of Indiana. 

On July 7, 1870, Mr. Smith was married to 
Sadie C. Garman, who was born Sept. 20, 1846, 
in Cambria county. Pa., daughter of Peter 
and Lucinda (Dunkle) Garman, the former 
a native of Franklin county. Pa., the latter of 
Green township, Indiana county. Mr. Gar- 
man was a prominent resident of his section 
of Cambria county for many years, engaging 
in lumbering and farming and also conduct- 
ing a sawmill. He organized and founded the 
town of Garman, named in his honor. In his 
later life he moved to Indiana county, where 
he lived retired for a number of years before 
his death. They were the parents of nine 
children. No children have been born to Mr. 
and IMrs. Smith, but they have reared two 
children : H. R. Spieher, who lived with them 
from the time he was five years old, is now 
married to Rachel McCullough, of Cookport, 
and they live upon Mr. Smith's farm in Green 
township. Sadie C. McCloskey, who was also 
raised by Mr. and Mrs. Smith, is now the wife 
of W. J. Henry, and they reside in Punxsu- 
tawney, Pa., where Mr. Henry is proprietor 
of the White Front restaurant. 

In 1906 Mr. and Mrs. Smith made a trip to 
California, spending five months in travel. 

REUBEN ELMER SCHALL, M. D., of 
Arcadia, Indiana coimty, has built up an ex- 
cellent private practice during the six years 
of his residence there and also acts as physi- 
cian for local coal companies, his various in- 
terests keeping him fully occupied. He is a 
native of the neighboring county of Arm- 
strong, born July 16, 1876, at Shay, son of 
Savandas and Rebecca J. (Heilman) Schall. 
His father was a mason and contractor in his 
active years. 

Dr. Schall obtained his preliminary educa- 
tion at the public schools, later attending the 



892 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Elderton (Pa.) Academy and the Clarion 
State normal school. He taught school four 
terms in Armstrong county. Taking up the 
study of medicine, he entered the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore, Md., 
graduating from that institution in 1904. The 
same year he located at Rural Valley, Arm- 
strong county, where he practiced for eighteen 
months, in 1906 settling at Arcadia, Indiana 
county, where he has since found a lucrative 
field for practice. He is chief physician at 
that point for the Pennsylvania Coal & Coke 
Company and the Ellsworth & Dunham Coal 
Company, both of Arcadia, who have about 
eight hundred employees at Arcadia. Dr. 
Schall is also physician for all the old-line in- 
surance companies doing business in Arcadia. 
He is a member of the Indiana County Medi- 
cal Society, the Pennsylvania State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Associa- 
tion, and socially is connected with the Knights 
of the Maccabees, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and Masons, having attained the 
thirty-second degree in the latter fraternity; 
in that connection he holds membership in 
John W. Jenks Lodge, No. 534, F. & A. M., 
the Consistory at Williamsport, Pa., and the 
Shrine at Altooua, Pa. He is a prominent 
member of the Lutheran Church, belonging to 
the Synod. As a citizen Dr. Schall takes an 
intelligent and public-spirited interest in the 
welfare of the community, and exerts his in- 
fluence for good movements whenever possible. 
On June 21, 1911, Dr. Schall married Nellie 
H. Mahaffy, of Burnside. Clearfield Co., Pa., 
daughter of John and ]\Iary Jane Mahaff>-, 
the former of whom was a hotel proprietor. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON BRANDON, a 
successful farmer and one of the bcst-kno\vn 
citizens of Center township. Indiiuia county, 
was born in Plumcreek township, Armstrong 
Co., Pa.. March 2, 1848, son of Thomas Jeffer- 
son and Bella fMcCracken) Brandon. 

John Brandon, the grandfather, was a 
native of "Westmoreland county, Pa., where he 
was somewhat prominent in county affairs, 
serving as justice of the peace and later as 
sheriff. Subsequently he removed to Arm- 
strong county, where he spent the remainder 
of his life, serving there also as a justice of 
the peace until his death, which occurred while 
he was away from home, having been called to 
perform a marriage ceremony. The immediate 
cause was undoulttedly heart trouble. His 
children were: Samuel, of Washington 
township. Indiana county, John, a soldier in 



the ilexican war; James, of Brookville, Pa.; 
and Thomas Jefferson. 

Thomas Jefferson Brandon, youngest son 
of Sheriff" John Brandon, was born in 1802 in 
Armstrong county, Pa., where he grew to ma- 
turity. In 1855 he left his native county and 
removed to Center township, Indiana county, 
near Homer City, where he purchased the 
farm on which he spent the remainder of his 
life, his death occurring in 1870. He was 
known as a man of strong chai-acter, honest 
and upright and enterprising as a citizen, 
serving Center township as an official a num- 
ber of times. In politics one of the early Re- 
publicans, and an abolitionist in his senti- 
ments regarding slavery, he was a great ad- 
mirer of Abraham Lincoln. When the Civil 
war was declared he endeavored to enlist, but 
was refused on account of his age. Of pleas- 
ing personality and great physical strength, 
he was a figure in any gathering he attended 
and was very highly esteemed. In 1825 he 
married Bella ilcCracken, daughter of Joseph 
McjCraeken, an old settler of Armstrong 
county, whose ancestors came from Ireland. 
To Sir. and Mi's. Brandon were born the fol- 
lowing children : Barbara, who married Wil- 
liam Auld. of Brushvalley, Pa. : John, who was 
killed at the battle of Seven Pines, the first 
engagement in which he took part as a soldier 
in the Civil war; Joseph, who died young; 
Slary, who married John Peddicord, of Bur- 
rell township ; Jane, who married Robert Mc- 
Cleam, of West Wlieatfield township; Wil- 
liam, residing in Adair coiint.y, Iowa, who 
married Margaret McCune; Isabella, who is 
the widow of William Bracken, and lives in 
Somei-set county. Pa. ; and Thomas Jeffei-son, 
who bears his honored father's name. 

Thomas Jefferson Brandon received his edu- 
cation in the Center township schools, work- 
ing on the home farm in the summer and at- 
tending school in the winter iintil he was 
twenty years old. Remaining at home he then 
took charge of the farm, and looked after the 
comfort of his parents until Ihey died, when 
he became the owaier of the homestead. He 
remained on the fann until 1894, when he 
sold it, and later purchased the A. H. Mike- 
sell place in Center township, at Homer City, 
which at the present time of writing (1912) 
is liis place of residence. For three years he 
conducted a meat market at Homer City, and 
for the same length of time owned a livery 
stable, but has always continued farm opera- 
lions, in which he is still interested, and also 
l)uys and sells stock. In this branch of agri- 
(•\ilt\ire he has been unusually successful, be- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



ing an excellent judge of cattle and stock. In 
political matters he is a stanch Republican, 
and since he was twenty-four years of age has 
served continuously in office in his township, 
faithfullj' performing his duties withont fear 
or favor. He has served as treasurer of the 
school board and is now president of that 
body. In addition to looking after his other 
interests, he is serving on the directing board 
of the Homer City National Bank. He is a 
member of the Lutheran Church. 

On March 5, 1872, Mr. Brandon was mar- 
ried to Nancy Jane Hildebraud, who is a 
daughter of Eli Hildebrand. a well-known 
farmer of Brushvalley township, and five chil- 
dren have been born to them, as follows : "Wil- 
liam Franklin, whose death, in young man- 
hood, was a crushing grief for his family; 
Gillis, who died in childhood : Mary Matilda, 
who married William McNutt. a business man 
of Homer City; ililton. who married Frank 
Campbell, a daughter of the late Dr. J. G. 
Campbell, of Homer City ; and Tracy, who at 
present is in the United States government 
service, being a rural mail carrier out from 
Homer City. 

Mr. Brandon is an example of the inodern, 
intelligent, well-informed agriculturist, and 
his farm industries and land cultivation are 
carried on according to scientific methods 
unknown to farmers of an older generation. 
He has spent time and means to improve his 
property suitabl.y, and it woiild be difficult to 
find in any part of the county a more attrac- 
tive rural home than that of Mr. and Mrs. 
Brandon, situated as it is on an eminence over- 
looking the pleasant town of Homer City. 

JOHN R. BRYAN, former school teacher 
and business man of Indiana, Pa., and now 
living retired, was born Jan. 8, 1838. on the 
old family homestead in White township, near 
Indiana, Indiana Co., Pa., and is a son of 
John MacCartney and Mary Barr (Allison) 
Bryan. 

Nathaniel Bryan, the great-grandfather of 
John R. Bryan, was bom in Ireland, and was 
there married to a Scotchwoman. He was a 
farmer in his native country, and on coming 
to America with his wife and seven sons 
located at the present site of Cumberland, 
Md. His eldest son was finely educated, and 
was one of the early government surveyors. 
laying out the town of Cumberland, Md., and 
later going to Kentucky, where he was mar- 
ried. Two of the sons of the progenitor set- 
tled in Virginia, and from one of these, it is 
•supposed, William Jennings Bryan is de- 



scended. Two other sons settled in New York 
State, one remained in Maryland, and the 
remaining son, the grandfather of John R, 
Brj'an, came to Indiana county, Pa. Nathaniel 
Bryan fought as a soldier in the war for 
American independence. 

Nathaniel Bryan (2), son of Nathaniel, and 
grandfather of John R. Bryan, was born in 
Ireland and was a lad when brought to the 
new world. He was reared to n\anhood in 
Cumberland, Md., and came to Indiana county. 
Pa., some time prior to his marriage, which 
occurred in Brushvalley township, to a Miss 
MacCartney. When he had reached advanced 
years he went to live at Greensburg, Decatur 
Co., Ind., the home of his three sons and one 
daughter, and died at the home of his son 
Joseph, when he had reached the remarkable 
age of ninety-six years. His wife died in In- 
diana county. Pa. They were both members 
of the Church of the Covenant. Their chil- 
dren were ; Samuel, a cabinetmaker by trade, 
when twenty-two .vears old accompanied a 
colony of Indiana county people to the woods 
at what is now Decatur, Ind., where he became , 
a prominent man, serving as justice of the 
peace and as judge of the county court, hold- 
ing the latter position at the time of his death 
(he left two daughters); Hannah, who mar- 
ried Robert Allison, settled on a farm in White 
township, and died there at the age of eighty- 
two years : ]\Irs. Joseph McCartne.y died on a 
farm in Wheatfield township ; John MacCart- 
ney is mentioned below; Charles, who as a 
youth learned the tanner's trade in Mahoning 
township, where he married a Miss Saddler, 
with his wife and two sons removed to Greens- 
burg, where he superintended the construction 
of a railroad, and where his wife died, Mr. 
Bryan subsequently returning to Mahoning 
township to marry her sister. Martha (he 
died at Greensburg, Ind.); Joseph, who ac- 
companied the colony to Greensburg, Decatur 
Co., Ind., where he was engaged in the hard- 
ware business up to the time of his death, 
married a Miss IMcCartney, and had two sons 
and two daughters; Martha made her home 
with her brofher Joseph, at Greensburg, De- 
catur Co., Ind., and died there, unmarried. 

John IilacCartuey Bryan, son of Nathaniel 
(2), and father of John R. Bryan, was born 
June 10, 1808, on the old homestead in Wheat- 
field township. Though during his entire life 
he received but three months of schooling, and 
in order to obtain that was obliged to walk 
five miles, no man in the county could keep a 
better set of books. After his marriage he 
settled at Strongstown. Indiana county, where 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



he kept the old tavern for two j^ears, and then 
purchased 138 acres of land one mile north of 
Indiana from David Ralston, subsequently 
piirchasing another property of the same size, 
located in the woods. He spent his entire life 
in the cultivation of these properties, and 
died April 10. 1860, in the faith of the Presby- 
terian Church, of which he was a trustee for 
man}" years, and to which his wife also be- 
longed. He was a Whig in his political views. 
Mrs. Bryan, who died June 24. 1872, at the 
age of seventy-five years, was the mother of 
these children: Sarah Jane married Thomas 
Ebey, and died in Topeka. Kans., at the age of 
seventy years; Samuel, who married Rebecca 
A. Rowe. lived and died on the old home- 
stead ; Rebecca nlarried Samuel Rowe, of Oska- 
loosa. Iowa, who w-as for thirt.v years in the 
fruit business there, and when Guthrie. Okla.. 
was opened for settleinent. went to that point 
and was there engaged in fruit raising, Mrs. 
Rowe still being a resident of Guthrie, al- 
though her husband is deceased ; Allison died 
at the age of four years; John R, is men- 
tioned below; Harrison, who married Maggie 
Wigens, lives on the old homestead ; "William 
B., a retired farmer of Indiana, Pa., married 
Deborah Berkepile, now deceased; James 
Mitchell died at the age of' three years; Tay- 
lor W.. who fought with the 55th Pennsylvania 
Volunteers during the Civil war, following 
that went to Sedalia. Mo., engaged in scene 
painting, married and died there. 

John R. Bryan received his education in the 
old subscription schools of Indiana borough 
and spent his boyhood days on the home farm. 
He started out to make his own way in the 
world with little else than determination, 
energy and a good mind and steady habits, 
and at the age of eigliteen years was teaching 
school at Ta.vlorsville, following that during 
the winter months. Mdiile the summer season 
w^as spent in advancing his own education, in 
Dayton Academy and the seminary at ]\Iarion 
Center. At the latter place his sister, Mrs. 
Rowe, resided, her husband being postmaster 
and conducting a general store at that place. 
Mr. Bryan worked in his brother-in-law's 
store and cari'ied mail, thus earning board and 
clothes, and at the age of twenty-three years 
endeavored to enlist in the 11th Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry. On account of his 
small stature, however, he was advised by the 
recruiting officer to "go home and grow a 
bit." Returning to his duties as teacher, Mr. 
Bryan spent tlie recesses in drilling his pupils, 
and the patriotic fever finally became so strong 
that a company was foriiicd, which was sub- 



sequently accepted and merged with Company- 
I, 67th Regiment, Pennsjdvauia Volunteer In- 
fantry, under Col. John F. Stanton, a full 
cousin of the famous Secretary of War Stan- 
ton. They went to camp in Philadelphia, and 
after drilling there and at the navy yard in 
Annapolis, were sent to do guard duty on the 
railroad. Later thej- went to Annapolis and 
eventually to Harper's Ferry, to assist in pre- 
venting Jackson's crossing into Maryland. 
AVith the 2d Corps, the regiment served in 
the Shenandoah valley, but during the fall of 
1863 was trausferred to the 3d Division, 6th 
Army Corps, with which it was identified until 
the close of hostilities. Mr. Bryan was cap- 
tured at Winchester, Va., and taken to Libby 
prison and thence to Belle Isle, whence he 
was transferred to a pai'ole camp at Annap- 
olis. From that city he walked home to see 
his mother, and on rejoining his regiment was 
discharged at Washington and mustered out 
of the service at Harrisburg, on account of 
the close of the war. 

Returning home, the .voung soldier was en- 
gaged in buying stock for one year, and on 
March 20, 1866, was man-ied "to Mary E. 
Dunn, of Penn Run. Pa., daughter of Cyrus 
and Sarah fEmptield) Dunn. Mr. Bryan 
then engaged in business as a huckster, but 
after four years entered the commission busi-- 
ness, in which he continued twenty-nine years. 
For more than a decade he has lived retired in 
Indiana, where he is widely known and highly 
esteemed. Mr. Bryan is essentially a self- 
made man, having gained success in life 
through the medium of his own efforts. He 
has had an able assistant in his worthy wife, 
who has shared with him all the vicissitudes 
of a long and useful career. They are con- 
sistent members of the United Presbyterian 
Church, and in political matters ilr. Bryan 
is a stanch Republican, having seiwed as over- 
seer of the poor for twelve years and in various 
other offices. He is a remarkably well pre- 
served man. and in spite of his seventy-five 
years reads the newspapers without the aid of 
glasses and has a very retentive memory. 

Mr. and ]\Irs. Bryan have had three chil- 
dren : Minnie J., who married R. M. Smith, 
of Indiana ; a child who died in infancy : and 
Wallace Steele. The latter was born in In- 
diana. Pa., April 5, 1867. and after attending 
•the public schools of the borough and the In- 
diana State normal school entered Washing- 
ton and Jefferson College, and subsequently 
took a course at Jefferson Medical College, 
Philadelphia, where he graduated. He at once 
engaged in practice at ^IcKeesport, but at 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



895 



present is practicing in Eamey, Clearfield 
county, where he is also the proprietor of a 
drug store. Dr. Bryan married Clara Howell, 
and they have one daughter: Mary. 

ISRAEL CARNAHAN, farmer, business 
man and public official of Armstrong town- 
ship, Indiana county, was born Sept. 18, 1849. 
in Bell township, Westmoreland Co., Pa., 
where the Carnahans lived prior to their set- 
tlement in Indiana county. 

The Carnahan family is numbered among 
the early settlers of this section of Pennsyl- 
vania, the Carnahans having come to America 
at the same time as the well-known Tomb fam- 
ily of East Wheatfield township, this county. 
Thomas Carnahan, grandfather of Israel Car- 
nahan, i-esided in Perrysville, Westmoreland 
county, five miles from Saltsburg. He mar- 
ried a Miss McKinley, and they had the fol- 
lowing children: Israel, Thomas, Elizabeth 
(married Matthias Jockey), Wilson (who 
went to California in 1849, returned to Pitts- 
burg and engaged in the shoe business), Sam- 
uel and David R. 

David R. Carnahan, son of Thomas, was 
born at Perrysville, in Bell township, AVest- 
moreland county, and died aged ninety-one, 
in Armstrong township, Indiana county. His 
schooling was limited, and at an early age he 
became head of a family. Fanning was his 
principal vocation, and he was enterprising 
and progressive, being the first man in West- 
moreland county to own a grain cradle. Later 
he went to J\IcKeesport, Pa., where he fol- 
lowed mining for a time, and then returning 
home to Westmoreland county bought a farm 
of 150 acres, which he subsequently laid out 
into building lots and sold, this being what is 
now Perrysville. In 1846 he became interested 
in salt works on the Kiskiminetas river, near 
Saltsburg, and for a time was engaged in mak- 
ing salt, and at the same time conducted a 
steam gristmill located on the Kiskiminetas. 
He then moved to what is now Salina station 
and followed milling, then moved to the old 
farm at Perrysville, and in 1848 came to In-~ 
diana county, where he purchased the James 
Clark farm of 150 acres in White township. A 
number of years afterward he made a trade 
with John Cunningham, giving that place for 
a tract of 180 acres in Armstrong township, 
upon which he passed the rest of his days, 
carrying on general farming. He was much 
respected in his neighborhood, served at one 
time as supervisor of roads, held other offices 
of trust, and was a valued member of the 
United Presbyterian Church. His first wife, 



Martha (Morrison), died at the age of thirty- 
seven years, and he subsequently married 
(second) Lavina Berkeypile. There were five 
children by the first union: Thomas M. is 
mentioned elsewhere; ilary Agnes married 
Thomas Hearn ; Israel is mentioned below ; 
Martha (deceased) married Sansom Person; 
John Morrison (deceased) married Margaret 
Cunningham. Eight children were born to 
the second marriage : Albert, Carrie, Harvey, 
Lottie, Levi, Levina, David M. and Dick. 

Israel Carnahan came to Indiana county 
with his parents in 1848 and received his edu- 
cation in the common schools in this county. 
He continued to reside with his parents till 
he was married, when he located on part of 
the homestead, a tract of seventy-two acres 
in Armstrong township, to which he has since 
added, now having eighty-five acres, and he 
has been improving the place continuously 
throughout the period of his residence there. 
In 1893 he built a large, substantial house and 
a fine barn, and by reason of natural ad- 
vantages and intelligent management the 
property is now one of the most valuable of 
its size in this section. It is richly underlaid 
with coal. Mr. Carnahan is thoroughly up-to- 
date in all his work, engaging in general farm- 
ing and stock raising. He was one of those 
chiefly instrumental in having the telephone 
line between Indiana and Parkwood estab- 
lished. In December, 1909, he and Mr. Wil- 
liam Glass started out to take subscriptions 
for the enterprise, and when they had enough 
guarantees to insure its success went to the 
Bell Telephone Company with the proposition 
and were promptly accommodated. It has 
proved a benefit to all its patrons, which is 
Mr. Carnahan 's best reward for his labors. 
He was elected president of the local com- 
pany, known as the Indiana & Parkwood Tele- 
phone Company (a subsidian' of the Bell Tele- 
phone Company), and served as such two 
years ; he is still a stockholder. Mr. Carnahan 
was foreman of the State road from Indiana 
to Apollo, Pa., during 1912-13, and he has fre- 
quently been honored with election to public 
office, "having served his township as school 
director, assessor, tax collector, road super- 
visor and member of the election board. Polit- 
ically he is a Republican. For thirty-four 
years he has been a member of the Crete 
United Presbyterian Church, to which his fam- 
ily also belongs, and he has served same twelve 
years as trustee and for the last twenty years 
as elder.' 

On Dec. 26, 1873, Mr. Carnahan married 
Nancy Angeline Anthony, daughter of David 



896 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



W. and Margaret (Miller) Anthony, of Arm- 
strong township, and they have had a family 
of twelve children, namely: Harry David, 
who is an employee in the United States mail 
service in Armstrong township, man-ied Mar- 
tha Lowry ; Minnie, who is teaching at Girty, 
Armstrong Co., Pa., was graduated from the 
Indiana State normal school in 1905; Eliza- 
beth married Samuel Shearer, a farmer in 
White township; Annie graduated from the 
Indiana State normal school and from busi- 
ness college, was a school teacher in Vandei'- 
grift at one time, and is now the wife of Lisle 
Coltbaugh; Lorretta is the wife of Arthur 
Warner, a farmer in Center township ; Bertha 
married Robert McCurdy, an engineer, of 
West Lebanon, Pa. ; Sadie gi-aduated from the 
Indiana State normal school in 1910, and is 
now teaching school in Armstrong township; 
Lisle M., a farmer in Armstrong township, 
married Zula Rowe ; Wilbur, Grace, Hazel and 
Imogene are at home. 

SAMUEL A. DOUGLASS, senior member 
of the Indiana County Bar Association, was 
born in Indiana, Pa., July 13, 1827, in the 
same scpiare in which his office is now located, 
and where he has resided for over eighty 
years. He is a son of Woodrow and Mary 
(Truby) Douglass. Samuel Douglass, the 
paternal grandfather, with his wife, Lydia 
(Adams) Douglass, located at Newport, on 
the Conemaugh, near the mouth of Blacklick 
creek, in Indiana county, Pa., in 1791. and 
removed to Indiana in 1805. Their children 
were: John, William, Samuel, Woodrow, 
James and Rachel, all now deceased. 

Woodrow Douglass was born at Newport 
in 1799, and his wife Mary (Truby) wks born 
at Greensburg, Westmoreland Co., Pa., June 
12, 1801. They were married in 1826. On 
Feb. 3. 1832, Woodrow Douglass was ap- 
pointed a .justice of the peace by Gov. George 
Wolf, and on Jan. 3, 1836, he was appointed 
by Gov. Joseph Ritner clerk of the Orphans' 
court and register of wills for the county of 
Indiana. In 1843 he was elected to the office 
of eount.y treasurer. His death occurred 
March 15, 1850, and his widow died Oct. 11, 
1893. The cliildren born to him. and his wife 
were: Samuel A., Mary A. (who died Julv 
14, 1830), Lydia A., Simeon W. (who died 
Sept. 29, 1884), Washington (who died I\Iay 
2, 1835\ Henrietta, John (since deceased), 
Elizabeth A. (married to M. F. Sherretts), 
William Q. (who died Nov. 16, 1851) and 
James (who died Nov. 27, 1851). 

Satinifl A, Douglass was educated in the 



common schools and Indiana academy, read 
law with William M. Stewart, Esq., and was 
admitted to the bar at the September term, 
1851. For some time afterward he was en- 
gaged at teaching school, clerking, etc. In 
the year 1S54 he received appointment to a 
clerkship in the District court of Indianapolis, 
in the State of Indiana, and was engaged 
there for some time, but owing to ill health 
returned to his home at Indiana, Pa., and 
resumed the practice of his profession, in 
1855. He was elected secretary and solicitor 
of the council of the borough of Indiana, Pa.. 
in 1856, in which he served continuously, with 
the exception of the years 1857, 1863 and 
1864, until September, 1895, making a service 
of thirty-six years. He was appointed deputy 
collector of internal revenue of the Twenty- 
first district of Pennsylvania in 1869, and 
held the position for three years. 

Mr. Douglass, having enlisted, was mustered 
into the United States service June 1, 1863, as 
a private in Company I, transferred to Com- 
pany H, 2d Battalion, six mouths' Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers, and- was honorably dis- 
charged Jan. 25, 1864. After his discharge he 
resumed the practice of law, and is now also 
engaged as " secretary-treasurer and manager 
of Greenwood cemetery. He is a member of 
Post No. 28, Grand Army of the Republic. 
One of his fellow practitioners expresses the 
high opinion the fraternity holds of him and 
his work thus: 

"Mr. Douglass never took an active part 
ill the trial of causes. He was a careful 
counselor, an excellent auditor, a good penman 
and accountant, honest, upright and compe- 
tent. He has the respect and confidence r>f 
liis fellow members of the bar and the public. 

"In 1903. when the eount.y celebrated its 
i-entennial, at the request of the bar Mr. Doug- 
lass wrote a sketch of the early history of the 
bar and of its members up to the time of writ- 
ing, a copy of which was filed with the Law 
Association of the county. It is a valuable 
document, and contains ranch information 
that would have been lost had it not been for 
his care and research in preparation." 

WILLIAM H. CA:MPBELL, farmer of Bur- 
i-ell township. Indiana county, is a member of 
an old settled family of this section and a 
citizen whose industrious life has gained him 
the respect of all who know him. He is a 
veteran of the Civil war. Jlr. Campbell was 
born Feb. 29, 1844. in West Wheatfield town- 
ship, this count.v, son of John Campbell, and 
grandson of David Campbell, the first Ameri- 
ran anccMor of tliis branch of the family. 




^ (2. yd~cH^f/&^ 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



897 



Toward the end of the eighteenth century 
Wheatfield township embraced all the terri- 
tory south of the Purchase Line ; sixteen 
townships have since been formed within her 
original boundaries. The first settlers in this 
district were emigrants from Ireland, from the 
Counties of Antrim and Armagh, they land- 
ing in America July 21, 1792. Stories of the 
New World soon attracted others left behind, 
and David Campbell, who was born in Ireland 
in 1794, came some time later to join this 
colony in Wheatfield. Leaving his native 
home he took passage on a sailing vessel to 
America, and after a stormy voyage of more 
than six weeks found himself on the shores of 
the New World. He proceeded westward over 
the Allegheny mountains to the Conemaugh 
valley and finally located on Blacklick creek 
near the present site of the village of Heshbon. 
He came to what is now East Wheatfield 
township in 1814, later purchasing by patent 
219 acres of land on Blacklick where he spent 
the remainder of his life. Assisted by his 
sons he cleared the land and erected buildings, 
and his farm became one of the productive 
tracts in the locality. Mr. Campbell was laid 
to rest in the Campbell graveyard on the 
homestead place. 

Mr. Campbell was twice married, his first 
wife being Elizabeth Kerr, daughter of Sam- 
uel and Jane Kerr, and by her he had two 
children, John and Elizabeth (who married 
William Murphy). By his second wife, Mar- 
garet (Mahan), he had a large family: Chris- 
topher, Robert M., James, Samuel, David, Por- 
ter M., Jane (who married William Palmer), 
Margaret A. and Alexander (who died young). 
Samuel, David and Porter were all ^Idiers 
in the Civil war. 

John Campbell, son of David, born Dee. 19, 
1812, in West Wheatfield township, grew to 
manhood there and obtained his education in 
the subscription schools then in vogue. But 
he made such good use of his rather meager 
opportunities that he became a schoolmaster, 
following his profession in West Wheatfield 
for some years. He also followed farming 
there, owning a tract of ninety -six Pcres upon 
which he carried on general farming and stock 
raising. Well-informed, intelligent, and in- 
terested in all that went on in the community, 
he was a valued and esteemed citizen. He 
lived to a ripe old age, dying on the farm 
June 8, 1896, at the age of eighty-three years, 
five months, twenty days, and was buried in 
the Bethel Church cemetery in West Wlieat- 
field township. In politics he was a Demo- 



crat, in religion a member of the United Pres- 
byterian Church. On Dec. 30, 1841, he mar- 
ried Mary Herron, who was bora in East 
Wheatfield township, daughter of William 
Herron, and is also buried in Bethel Church 
cemetery. She, too, was a member of the 
United Presbyterian Church. The following 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Campbell : 
Elizabeth, born Aug. 23, 1842, married Isaac 
Alcorn, of West Wheatfield township; Wil- 
liam H. is mentioned below; Christopher D., 
born Feb. 27, 1846, farmer of Brushvalley 
township, married Sarah Campbell; David, 
born July 30, 1848, died young; John H., born 
Jan. 18, 1851, is a farmer in Burrell town- 
ship ; Martha Jane, born April 25, 1853, mar- 
ried John McNutt ; Mary Ellen, born Jan. 9, 
1856, died young; Margaret, born in 1858, 
married John Piper, of Garfield, Pa. ; Samuel 
H., born Dee. 4, 1860, lives at East Liverpool, 
Ohio. 

William H. Campbell grew to manhood on 
the home farm, spending his boyhood days in 
attendance at the local public schools and in 
assisting his father. He remained at home 
with his parents until he enlisted, in August, 
1864, in Company H, 206th Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteer Infantry, under Capt. J. C. Greer and 
Col. H. J. Brady, serving until the close of 
the war. He was mustered out at Richmond, 
Va. Returning home he continued to do farm 
work in West Wheatfield township until he 
settled upon the Sides farm in Burrell town- 
ship, a tract of ninety acres which he operated . 
for six years. He next moved to the Samuel 
Ray place in Burrell township, containing 
130 acres, which he operated for Mr. Ray 
until 1908, when the property was sold to 
Wilber P. Graft, of Blairsville, this county, 
for whom Mr. Campbell has since carried it 
on. He is a practical farmer and stock raiser, 
as his long management of the same farm 
would indicate, and everything about the 
place testifies to his neatness and good taste 
as well as to his industry. He is a hard 
worker, and is well liked by his associates. 
Mr. Campbell takes a public-spirited interest 
in whatever concerns the general welfare, but 
has been particularly active in securing good 
public school facilities in his locality, having 
served for over twenty years as school direc- 
tor of Burrell township ; he has served three 
years as president of the school board and 
five years as secretary. He cast his first vote 
while in the army, for Lincoln, and has been 
a Republican ever since. His religious con- 
nection is with the United Presbyterian 
Church of Blairsville, of which he is a leading 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



member, having served as member of the 
building committee, as member of the finance 
committee and (at present) as ruling elder. 
He takes a deep interest in every branch of 
church work. Mrs. Campbell also belongs to 
that church. 

Mr. Campbell's first marriage was to Mary 
Miller, a native of West Wheatfield town- 
ship, daughter of David Miller, of Somerset 
county, Pa. Children as follows were born to 
them : John, who is a resident of Vandergrift, 
Pa., where he is employed in the tin sheet mill ; 
David Miller, an employee of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company, now residing at Madison, 
Pa. ; and Elva Jane, who married John J. 
Armstrong, of Girard, Ohio. Mrs. Campbell 
died April 5, 188(^ on the homestead. On 
March 22, 1883, Mr. Campbell married (sec- 
ond) Pirmillia (Anna) Hutchinson, of West 
Wheatfield township, daughter of Cornelius 
and Catherine (Fry) Hutchinson, and by her 
has had five children : Elsie, who is deceased ; 
Harry Ray, who is engaged in the postoffice 
at Turtle Creek, Pa.; William Lloyd, in the 
employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany at Blairsville, Pa. ; Earl Scott, also in 
the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany at Blairsville; and ]\Iary Catherine, at 
home. 

JOHN McLaughlin, in whose death 
Brushvalley township lost one of its best citi- 
zens and successful agriculturists, was a 
native of Indiana county, born in Center 
township, near the line of Brushvalley town- 
ship. May 13, 1843. 

John McLaughlin, father of John, was a 
native of Ireland, and came of that sturdy 
race of men which has done much to make 
the State of Pennsylvania one of the best in 
the Union. He w-as born in County Down, in 
1799, and came to America in the prime of 
manhood, locating in Center township, In- 
diana Co., Pa., where he became the owner of 
a tract of 177 acres in the wilderness. Here 
he settled down to pioneer life in the forest, 
erecting a log house and barn, and he ever 
afterw^ard made this spot his home. He 
worked hard to clear up his place, but death 
came while he was still in middle age, on Jan. 
6, 1850, and he was laid to rest on the farm 
which he had helped to clear up. He was a 
man of strict honesty, integrity of purpose, 
industrious and hard-working. His devotion 
to his wife and family made his death most 
hard for those he left to mourn him. ^Iv. 
IMcLaughlin married Mary McLaughlin, and 
their children were: Catharine, who died 



young; Eve, who married Hiram Clawson; 
Mary, w^ho married Daniel Byers; Michael, 
who resides at Parkers Landing, Pa. ; Phebe, 
who married Anderson Clauson; and John. 

John McLaughlin was but seven years old 
when his father died. He attended the local 
schools and worked on the homestead from 
early boyhood, caring for his widowed mother, 
who passed away there. He continued to 
operate the home farm, engaging in general 
farming and stock raising until 1886, when he 
moved with his family to Brushvalley town- 
ship, on the Thomas Fee farm, which was the 
home of his father-in-law, a tract of thirt}"- 
three acres. This he operated together with 
the homestead farm in Center township the 
remainder of his life. Mr. IMcLaughlin was 
occupied also in butchering, selling his meats, 
etc., at Johnstown, Pa., and he did a large 
business in that line. 

:\Ir. McLaughlin died May 17, 1908, aged 
sixty-five years, and was buried in the ceme- 
tery at Armagh, Pa. He made the Golden 
Rule his chief religion in life and most con- 
scientiously lived up to it. He was an honor- 
able, industrious man, an excellent citizen, 
and one who did much for his community. A 
Republican in politics, he served as school 
director for nine years, and for many years as 
overseer of the poor, and took an active part 
in all town affairs. He was hard-working, his 
chief aim in life being to make his family com- 
fortable and afford them the opportunities of 
good education. 

Mr. McLaughlin married Nov. 4, 1869, Mar- 
garet Ella Fee, born in Brushvalley town- 
ship, daughter of Thomas and Jane (Mahan) 
Fee. Mrs. McLaughlin is still living on the 
old homestead, tenderly cared for in her de- 
clining years by her devoted family. Five 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. ^IcLaugh- 
lin, viz.: (1) Effie M. is at home. (2) Clif- 
ford Thomas, born Nov. 15, 1874, was edu- 
cated in the Brushvalle.v schools, also attended 
summer normal school under Prof. J. T. 
Stewart and Prof. C. A. Campbell, and taught 
school for fifteen years, principally in Brush- 
valley and East Wheatfield townships, In- 
diana county, though he was also engaged in 
Cambria and Allegheny counties. Later he 
became manager of the five and ten cent store 
of Mr. Bonner, at Braddoek, Pa., filling that 
position for one year, and he is now in the 
United States postal service at Windber. Pa., 
serving as letter carrier. He married Fannie 
Wakefield, and they have one child, Jennett 
C. (3) Myrtle obtained her education in the 
public schools of Brushvalley and the summer 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



school at Homer City, studying under Mr. 
Bracken and Mr. Welsh. She has been a suc- 
cessful school teacher, having taught in public 
school in both Indiana and Cambria counties. 
(4) Gillis Lloyd, born July 17, 1882, was also 
educated in the public schools of Brushvalley 
and summer normal schools under Prof. J. T. 
Stewart and Prof. C. A. Campbell, and at- 
tended summer school at Homer City under 
Messrs. Bracken and Welsh. He taught school 
for five years in the townships of Brushvalley, 
West Wheatfield, Burrell and Center, and 
now resides on the homestead, engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising. (5) J. Ralph, 
born Sept. 25, 1888, was also educated in the 
public schools of Brushvalley, and summer 
normal school under Profs. J. T. Stewart and 
C. A. Campbell, and taught four years in East 
Wheatfield and Burrell townships. He was a 
bookkeeper for the Lumber Manufacturing 
Company of Johnstown. 

ELISHA GREEN, a druggist of Plumville, 
Indiana county, where he is also justice of 
the peace and notary public, was born near 
Sagamore, in Cowanshannock township, Arm- 
strong Co., Pa., June 13, 1853, son of Abraham 
Green. 

Ezekiel Green, father of Abraham Green, 
was born near Williamsport, Pa., came to Arm- 
strong county with his father, and was a 
blacksmith and farmer at Sagamore, where 
his death occurred. 

Abraham Green, son of Ezekiel Green, was 
a farmer of Cowanshannock township, where 
he owned 120 acres of land. This he devoted 
to stock raising and general farming, and be- 
came a successful agriculturist, making many 
improvements upon his property. As he 
cleared his land he converted the trees into 
lumber, being thus employed until his death, 
which occurred when he was eighty-one years 
old. For many years he was a member of the 
Lutheran Church, St. John's, and was buried 
in the cemetery attached to that church. In 
politics he was a Republican, but he did not 
seek public office. Abraham Green was mar- 
ried in Armstrong county to Esther A. Smith, 
who died on the homestead and is buried in 
the same cemetery as her husband. 

Elisha Green, son of Abraham Green, re- 
ceived a good practical education in the public 
schools of his township, at Glade Run academy 
and a select school at Plumville, and then for 
eleven years taught school, being engaged 
eight years in Armstrong county, and three 
years in Indiana county. In 1883 he bought 
the drug store at Plumville owned by the 



Winrer brothers, and has since devoted his 
energies to conducting it. This is the leading 
drug store in South Mahoning township, and 
Mr. Green meets popular demand very capably 
by carrying a fine and varied line of station- 
ery, wall paper and similar goods in addition 
to his drugs. Besides, he owns a fine eighty- 
acre farm on which he raises stock and carries 
on general farming. Having been appointed 
a notary public by Governor Tener in 1901, 
he was a logical candidate for justice of the 
peace and was elected by a handsome majority 
in 1902 and reelected in 1907, receiving his 
commission from Governor Stewart. No ap- 
peals have been taken from his decisions, for 
those who come before him recognize his sense 
of justice and appreciate his interest in giving 
them a fair deal, while at the same time en- 
forcing the law vigorously. He took an im- 
portant part in the organization of the 
borough of Plumville, and is a strong Repub- 
lican of the old school, steadfastly adhering to 
President Taft, of whom he is a great ad- 
mirer. An Odd Fellow, belonging to the 
lodge at Plumville, he is now a past grand of 
that body and a member of the grand lodge 
of the State; he also belongs to the Rebek- 
ahs. He is a member of the Woodmen of 
the World of Indiana. Both he and his wife 
are active members of the Presbyterian 
Church, which he is serving as elder, and he 
has long been a Sunday school teacher and 
superintendent, carrying into his everyday 
life the creed he professes. 

In 1874 Mr. Green was married in Arm- 
strong county to Clarinda Adam, born in 
Plumville, a daughter of David Adam. Mrs. 
Green is one of the most devoted of wives and 
mothers, and her home reflects her high. 
Christian character. Mr. and Mrs. Green be- 
came the pai-ents of three children : David 
Nelson (who died when seven years old), Sara 
Etta and James Blaine. Sara Etta Green, 
who was educated in music at Irwin College, 
taught music in the public schools of Plum- 
ville for six years prior to her marriage to 
Moody A. Speedy, an electrical engineer with 
the Westinghouse Company of Pittsburg, by 
whom she has one son, Alexander Blaine. 

James Blaine Green, youngest child of 
Elisha Green, was born Aug. 3, 1884, in Plum- 
ville, where he attended public school, later 
going to the summer normal held in that town. 
He fitted himself for a business life by taking 
a course in the Bliss commercial college of 
Columbus, Ohio, from which he was gi-aduated 
June 30, 1902. Following this Mr. Green en- 
tered Allegheny College, at Meadville, and 



900 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



took a classii-al i-ourse, but did not graduate 
owing to ill health. Later he pursued his 
studies ill pharmacy in the pharmaceutical 
department of Pittsburg College, from which 
he was graduated in 1905. with the degree of 
Ph. G. For several years thereafter he as- 
sisted his father in the drug business, but on 
July 12, 1911, was made assistant cashier and 
bookkeeper of the Fii-st National Bank of 
Plumville. and held that position until Octo- 
ber, 1912, when he resigned to resume the 
drug business. His skill as a druggist has 
long been appreciated by the people of Plum- 
ville, and both he and his father are well 
known over a wide territory that embra.ces 
several counties. 

In 1905 Governor Pennypacker appointed 
Mr. Green a notary public, and he was reap- 
pointed by Governor Tener. Mr. Green 's con- 
nection witli the Odd Fellows is of such a 
nature as to reflect credit upon him as a man 
and a member of that fraternitv. He lielongs 
to Plumville Lodge No. 803, I. 0. O. F., of 
which he is a past gi-and, and also belongs to 
the grand lodge of the State ; he is past cliief 
patriarch of Dayton Encampment. No. 121. 
I. 0. 0. F., and is active in Desdemona Lodge, 
No. 350, Rebekah degree, of Plumville. Mr. 
Green is also interested in the Elks at In- 
diana. Like his father he is a strong Repub- 
lican. He has been judge of election of his 
borough, and having been on the l)oard of 
health for some time has given Plumville the 
benefit of his professional knowledge, and 
placed it under lasting obligations to him. He 
is also serving as secretary of the borough 
council. During 1910 Mr. Green did effective 
and conscientious work as a census enumera- 
tor in South Mahoning township and Plum- 
ville. 

During recent years, Mr. Green has found 
recreation and profit in giving some attention 
to stock breeding and raising in partnership 
with his father, and they have specialized with 
favorable results in Jersey cattle. 

In an age when there is such decided com- 
petition, it is necessary for a man to train his 
faculties carefully in order to keep abreast 
of the tide of human events. It is not often, 
however, that men are found who not only 
succeed in one or other of the learned pro- 
fessions, but who hold equally important posi- 
tions in public affairs and the business world 
as well. Yet this is the case with the Greens, 
father and son. They are men of unusual 
endowments, who recognize the requirements 
of their times and endeavor to live up to them. 
Men of high character, they manage to imbue 



others with some of their public spirit, and 
whatever undertaking they espouse is likely 
to be carried on effectivelj' under their com- 
petent leadership. They have both been active 
in municipal affairs, always giving the people 
more than their ofdces demand, and few are 
held in such high regard as they. Such citi- 
zens prove conclusively that right living, high 
thinking and honorable methods of action do 
pay not only in the long run, but at all times. 

JAJVIES A. GROSSMAN, who has long 
been justice of the peace and is at present also 
sei-ving as burgess of Indiana, has been identi- 
fied with official circles in Indiana county for 
many years. He is interested in several local 
business enterprises, and is one of the repre- 
sentative citizens of this section, where he has 
spent all his life. Mr. Grossman was born 
May 3, 1819, in Indiana county, son of Asa 
and Mary (Robinson) Grossman. His grand- 
father was bom in the East, presumably in 
IMassachusetts, and came to Indiana county. 
Pa., when a young man, following farming 
here. 

Asa Grossman was born and reared in In- 
diana county, and was a farmer bj' occupation. 
He married Mary Robinson, whose father was 
born in the north of Ireland, of Scotch-Irish 
pai'entage, and emigrated to the L^nited States 
in early life, settling in Indiana county, Pa., 
where he engaged in farming. Mr. Grossman 
died in 1900, his wife in 1902. They had a 
family of eight children, namely : Henrietta, 
wife of Daniel Siler; Elizabeth, wife of John 
Enterline ; James A. ; Anna, wife of Hulet 
Smith; Everett L. ; Augusta H., wife of 
Charles Oberlin ; Isaac ; Susan, wife of M. L. 
Stevens. The parents were members of the 
M. E. Church. 

James A. Grossman began his education in 
the public schools, later continuing his studies 
at the Dayton (Pa.) Academy. He taught 
school for a period of five yeai-s, after which 
he was engaged in the general mercantile busi- 
ness for two years. In 1893 he became clerk 
to the county commissioners, which position 
he filled for five yeai-s, at the end of which 
time he was elected justice of the peace. He 
has since served continuously in that office, 
having l)een twice reelected, the present be- 
ing his third five-year term in that office. In 
1907 Mr. Grossman was elected burgess of In- 
diana and served three successive yeai-s, and 
in December, 1911, he was appointed to that 
office, to fill a vacancy, serving now under that 
appointment. Mr. Grossman is thoroughly in- 
terested in and associated with local indus- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



901 



tries, being a stockholder in the Dugaii Glass 
Company and other concerns in the borough, 
and he is verj- well known in fraternal con- 
nection, belonging to the Elks, Eagles, Royal 
Arcanum and Jlodern Woodmen, and a past 
officer of the Elks and Eagles. He is a mem- 
ber of the Lutheran Church. 

Mr. Crossman married Agnes Oberlin, 
daughter of Charles Oberlin, and they have 
three children: Lesbra C, wife of George 
Rigg; Charlotte, wife of Clyde Seanor, and 
Gertrude. 

WILLIAM B. SERENA, senior member of 
the firm of W. B. Serena & Sons, of Saltsburg, 
was born Oct. 28, 1836, in Ligonier township, 
Westmoreland Co., Pa., a son of Joseph Serena 
and grandson of Joseph Serena, the latter a 
soldier of the war of 1812. His wife 's maiden 
name was McGee. 

Joseph Serena, son of Joseph Serena and 
father of William B. Serena, was a farmer in 
Loyalhanna township, Westmoreland Co., Pa., 
becoming the owner of over 200 acres divided 
into two farms. He continued to be a farmer, 
teamster and lumberman throughout his life. 
Mr. Serena married Catherine Baker, who was 
born in Philadelphia, Pa., of German ancestry, 
and their children were: Lucinda; Mary; 
William Baker; Elizabeth; Philip, who en- 
listed in Company I, 11th Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteer Infantry, later reenlisting in 1862, in 
Company K, 62d Pennsylvania Volunteer In- 
fantry, again in Company C, 191st Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry, and the fourth 
time in Company E, 155th Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteer Infantry; Joseph; and David, who 
served in the 4th Pennsylvania Cavalry from 
the early part of 1865 until the close of the 
war. 

William B. Serena attended the local schools 
of his native township, but at an early day 
began working on the McFarland farm, re- 
maining in charge of it for two years. He 
then went to New Alexandria, Westmoreland 
Co., Pa., where he learned the carpenter's 
trade with his uncle, and at the completion of 
his apprenticeship worked in the oil fields in 
Titusville and Oil City, Pa., with a fair meas- 
ure of success. 

In 1882 Mr. Serena came to Saltsburg, where 
he embarked in a meat business, and com- 
manded a large trade drawn from all over 
that part of Indiana county. Later he opened 
a meat market on Salt street, on the present 
site of Stahl's store, and occupied these prem- 
ises until 1902, when he built his present com- 
modious quarters on Indiana street, having a 



three-story frame structure, equipped with all 
the modern machinery, including a magnifi- 
cent ice plant, for a first-class slaughterhouse. 
Mr. Serena now conducts a large wholesale 
and retail butchering business in conjunction 
with his sons under the firm style of W. B. 
Serena & Sons, and controls an immense trade 
that covers a wide area. In addition to carry- 
ing all kinds of meats, both cured and fresh, 
he handles sea foods, which he ships direct 
from the ocean ports to accommodate his pa- 
trons. Mr. Serena raises a number of his cat- 
tle and other stoc^k on his farm in Loyalhanna 
township, Westmoreland Co., Pa., and buys 
the remainder. Having been in this line of 
business so many years, he is thoroughly con- 
versant with its every detail, and his patrons 
benefit through his wide experience and 
thorough knowledge. His judgment with re- 
gard to stock is excellent, and is relied upon 
by many who look to him in matters relating 
to his line of business. 

Mr. Serena married Theressa Kaney, a 
daughter of Stephen and Hannah (Jackson) 
Kaney, and they are the parents of children 
as follows : James Clifford, Beletta M., Joseph 
W., Clyde Washington and Philip C, the two 
last named dying in infancy. 

For a number of years Mr. Serena has been 
a consistent Methodist. His political views 
make him a Republican, and he has always 
given a stanch support to the principles of 
his party. In 1863 he enlisted in Company K, 
62d Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving 
with this regiment one year, after which he 
was transferred to Company B, 155th Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Infantry, of which he was 
also a member for about one year. He was 
then changed to Company E, 191st Pennsyl- 
vania Regiment, serving in all about two years, 
six months. 

WILLIAM BAXTER CRAWFORD, owner 
of over six hundred acres of improved land in 
Young township, is the leading agriculturist 
of his part of Indiana county and also has ex- 
tensive interests in other lines, being a man 
of all-around business ability and remarkable 
enterprise. He has done threshing in Indiana 
county and adjoining sections of Armstrong 
and Westmoreland counties for the last forty 
years, and for thirty years has carried on the 
manufacture of lumber, in both Indiana and 
Armstrong counties. Mr. Crawford was born 
in Young township Sept. 22, 1855. William 
Crawford, his gi'andfather, was a pioneer set- 
tler in the Eldersridge section of that town- 
ship, where he became the owner of a tract 



902 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



of four hundred acres, on part of which land 
the mining town of Iselin now stands. He 
followed farming and spent his life there, 
dying on his farm, and is buried in the 
Ebenezer cemetery. He was of Scotch extrac- 
tion and a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. His wife, whose maiden name was 
McDowell, also died on the farm and was 
buried in Ebenezer cemetery. Their children 
were : Ann, who married James Clemens and 
lived in Allegheny county, Pa. ; Isabelle, who 
married Daniel Shearer; Sarah Jane; 
Matthew, who lived in Armstrong county; 
James; and John, who died in the West. 

James Crawford, son of William, was born 
near Eldersridge in Young township, and 
there attended public school. At an early age 
he began work on the construction of the 
Pennsylvania canal, and also engaged in other 
lines, eventually settling down to farming in 
Conemaugh township, this county, on a 128- 
acre tract near Clarksburg. He devoted his 
time to general farming and stock raising and 
passed the remainder of his long life on that 
place, dying there at the age of eighty-three 
yeai-s, eleven months, twenty-three days. He 
was a member of the United Presb.yterian 
Church, and is buried in the U. P. cemetery 
at Olivet. Armstrong county. In politics he 
was originally a Whig, later a Republican. 
Mr. Crawford married Jane Baxter, who was 
born in Allegheny county, Pa., daughter of 
William Baxter and sister of William Baxter, 
prominent oil operator in his day and well 
known in both Indiana and Armstrong coun- 
ties. ]\Irs. Crawford died at the homestead 
and is buried in the same cemetery as her 
husband. Six children were born to their 
union: Mary Jane, who is on the old home- 
stead : William Baxter ; John, now a resident 
of Pittsburg, in the employ of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company ; Nancy, who married 
Frank Gordon ; James, who is on the old home- 
stead ; and Sarah Belle, on the old homestead. 

William Baxter Crawford was allowed the 
advantages the schools near his home afforded, 
and until he reached the age of twenty did 
farm work on the home place for his father. 
He then began threshing on his own account, 
being one of the first in this region to follow 
that line on the plan now generally adopted. 
He began with a three-horsepower machine, 
and as he became able to improve his equip- 
ment came to own an eight-horsepower outfit. 
and since he commenced to use steam power 
has had five engines. His work has taken 
him all over Young. Conemaugh and Arm- 
strong townsliips, in Indiana county, and into 



ArnLstrong and Westmoreland counties, and 
he has always commanded a large patronage; 
liis sons now assist him in this business. For 
seven years in his early manhood Mr. Craw- 
ford worked with liis uncle William Baxter in 
the oil fields of Clarion county. Pa., drilling, 
pumping and gauging. In 1879 he settled 
down to farming on the Matthew Crawford 
place, near what is now Iselin, and he has 
added to his farming property steadily since 
then, having bought other land in the town- 
ship until he now owns and operates over six 
hundred acres. His purchases include the old 
Robert Elder homestead, a tract of 125 acres ; 
the T. C. Watson farm, and the McCombs 
farm. All these properties have been greatly 
improved with buildings, fences, etc., during 
his ownership, his thrifty management and 
good judgment being apparent in the sub- 
stantial nature of all the building he has had 
done and the careful attention to detail in evi- 
dence everywhere on his holdings. He also 
continues the manufacture of lumber, in which 
he has been interested for thirty years. There 
is no more progressive man in the locality, 
and he has not onl.v been active in promoting 
his own interests but influential in encourag- 
ing every movement for the general good, his 
support being regarded as a valuable asset to 
any project for the benefit of the community. 
Though a Republican in political sentiment 
he is independent in his advocacy of meas- 
ures and his support of candidates for public 
position. 

On June 6, 1878, Mr. Crawford married 
]\Iattie J. Dunmire, of Maysville, Armstrong 
Co., Pa., daughter of Andrew Dunmire. The 
ceremony was performed by Rev. J. C. Tel- 
ford. Four children were ])orn to this mar- 
riage: Oliver Rowland, born Jan. 29. 1879, 
who remained on the homestead, and died 
April 29, 1908; James Carl, born Oct. 28, 
1881, at home; Andrew Claude, born Aug. 28, 
1887, who is at home; and William Baxter, 
Jr.. born Aug. 13, 1889. at home. The motlier 
died May 19. 1890. On Jan. 11. 1894, Mr. 
Crawford was married, by Rev. S. A. Hughes, 
of Bethel Church, in Center township, In- 
diana county, to Annie M. George, a native 
of Center township, daughter of Walter Bates 
George, of that township, full mention of 
whose family will be found elsewhere in this 
work. They have had one child. Walter Ham- 
ilton, born July 8, 1896, Mr, and Mrs. Craw- 
ford and their children are members of the 
Presbyterian Church at Eldersridge. Fra- 
(ernallv he is an Odd Fellow and I\Iason 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



903 



(Lodge No. -131, F. & A. M.), belonging to 
the lodges at Saltsburg, this county. 

J. MILTON JOHNSTON, agriculturist and 
dairyman and a man well known all over In- 
diana county, Pa., was born Oct. 24, 1863, 
son of James and Martha (Gibson) Johnston. 

James Johnston, great-grandfather of J. 
Milton Johnston, in 1814, came with his wife, 
Mary (Perry), from Franklin county. Pa., to 
Indiana county, settling on a small tract of 
land in Center township, which had been 
cleared, and a log cabin erected. In this 
neighborhood they spent the remainder of 
their lives, rearing a family of ten children, 
namely : Adam, Elizabeth, James, Anne, Rob- 
ert, Mary, Sarah, John, William and Greorge 
W. 

Adam Johnston, the oldest son of James 
and Mary Johnston, was born in Franklin 
county and accompanied his parents to In- 
diana county, where he grew to manhood, giv- 
ing his father assistance in clearing up the 
pioneer farm. In 1824 he married a member 
of the McNulty family, bearing the name of 
either Mary or Nancy, and to them the fol- 
lowing children were born: IMary, who be- 
came the wife of Charles McCracken ; James ; 
Isabella ; Margaret, who married Hiram St. 
Clair; John; Robert, who married Mary E. 
Latimer and (second) Cynthia Meredith; and 
George W., who married Mary Dixon. Mr. 
Johnston was one of the first men in Center 
township to serve as a justice of the peace and 
filled that office for many years. He pur- 
chased 156 acres of land from a tract war- 
ranted to Dr. Robert Johnston in 1786, pat- 
ented in 1796, which was part of a tract 
known as ' ' The Valley. ' ' and on this laud his 
life was spent in farming and his children 
were reared. He was buried in the Bethel 
Church graveyard in Center township. 

James Johnston, son of Adam Johnston, 
was born and reared on the old homestead and 
received the usual educational training that 
country boys then enjoyed. At the time of his 
marriage he bought fifty acres of his father 
and fifty more from the Harold farm, adjoin- 
ing, and with this land to cultivate he became 
busy and industrious and soon was regarded 
as one of the prosperous men of his commu- 
nity. Wliile cultivating his land he made im- 
provements for the comfort of his family and 
his buildings wei-e substantial and attractive. 
For many years he devoted a large amount of 
attention to the buying and selling of cattle 
and all kinds of stock, which he either shipped 
or drove to Reading, Pa., a convenient mar- 



ket. For a time he had as partners in this 
business first Peter Harold and later J. D. 
Dickie, both of Center township, but he was 
([uite capable of carrying on large transac- 
tions alone. He continued to increase his 
land holdings until he had acquired 300 acres 
at the time of retirement from activity. 

Mr. Johnston was elected on Nov. 8, 1881, 
a county commissioner of Indiana county, and 
served three years, his colleagues being Wil- 
liam Mabon and James A. McQuown. In 
polities he was a stanch Republican, and 
served his constituents and party in a faith- 
ful manner in every office to which he was 
elected. In addition to serving as a county 
official he was useful in township offices, for 
nine years being overseer of the poor and sev- 
eral terms township assessor. Far and wide 
he was known for his genial disposition as 
well as for his keen business qualifications. 
During the greater part of his life he was a 
member of Bethel Presbyterian Church, and 
was a trustee for many years. In 1893 he 
retired from active business and moved to In- 
diana, where he continued to reside until his 
death, which occurred in May, 1904; he was 
interred in Oakland cemetery. 

On March 29, 1849, Mr. Johnston married 
]\Iartha Gibson, daughter of Robert Gibson, 
of Center township, the ceremony being per- 
tonned in the Gibson (now Pounds) stone 
house, which was built about 1800. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Johnston were born the following 
children : Annie, who married John Kinnan ; 
Lizzie and Jennie, both of whom reside at In- 
diana ; James Stewart, now deceased, who was 
a merchant at Jacksonville, Pa.; and J. 
J\Iilton. 

J. Milton Johnston received his educational 
training in the Harold or jMyers school in 
Center township and continued to assist his 
father until his own marriage. At this time 
he located on the Adam Johnston farm, and 
when his father retired, in 1893, assumed 
charge of the homestead which he bas man- 
aged successfully ever since. At the present 
time of writing he is residing temporarily at 
Indiana, but continues to direct his farming 
operations as carefully as he did when living 
on his farm. At present he owns 630 acres of 
land, on which a large herd of cows is kept 
and an up-to-date dairy is maintained under 
his careful supervision. 

On Dec. 26. 1889, Mr. Johnston was mar- 
ried to Louie IMabon, a daughter of Francis 
Mabon. who formerly was a county commis- 
sioner of Indiana county, and four children 
have been born to them, namely: Stewart, 



904 



HISTORY OF'INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



who lives on the Harold farm near the home- 
stead, married to Edna Britton, of Jefferson 
county ; Francis Perry, who is a student in 
the Indiana State normal school ; Martha, and 
Ernest. 

A Republican in politics, Mr. Johnston has 
been a conscientious voter but has never ac- 
cepted any office except on the school board, 
serving for twelve years in Center township, 
during eight of which he was secretary of the 
board. He is an active worker in the Presby- 
terian Church, of which he is a trustee, and 
was formerly superintendent of the Sunday 
school. 

CHARLES DEVINNEY FERGUSON, of 
Burrell township, Indiana count3% belongs to 
one of the oldest families of that section. He 
was born Sept. 29, 1866, on the old Ferguson 
homestead on Stewards run, in Blacklick 
township, this coiinty, where several gener- 
ations of Fergusons have lived and labored. 
They are of Scotch origin. 

James Ferguson, the emigrant ancestor of 
the family, was born March 17, 1746, in Scot- 
land, where he passed his early life. On 
Dec. 31, 1770, he was married there to Eliza- 
beth Elliott, who was born Jan. 4, 1750, and 
they came with their family to America about 
the close of the Revolutionary war, settling 
tirst at ]\Iorrison's Cove, in Huntingdon coun- 
ty. Pa. In 1786 they removed to what is 
now Blacklick township, Indiana county 
(then a part of Westmoreland county), locat- 
ing on a tract of land which was patented in 
the name of Barbara Elliott. The family re- 
mained for a short period at the Dixon block- 
house, at Broad Ford, but made a permanent 
home in Blacklick township, where Mr. Fer- 
guson died April 30, 1813. His wife had died 
Oct. 26, 1792, at the age of forty-two years. 
They were the parents of the following chil- 
dren : William, born Nov. 14, 1771 (died 
Sept. 23, 1819); Rebecca, April 20, 1773; 
John, May 20, 1775 (died Jan. 11, 1791): 
Hanee, March 3, 1777 (died April 30, 1813) ; 
Elizabeth, March 30, 1779; James, Feb. 17, 
1781; Samuel, March 27, 1783 (died Dec. 14, 
1843), David. Jan. 30, 1786 (died Aug. 9. 
1862) ; Jean, April 17, 1788; Elliott, Dee. 14, 
178P (died June 7, 1852) ; Marv, Sept. 10, 
1792. 

James Ferguson, son of James and Eliza- 
beth (Elliott) Ferguson, was lioni Feb. 17, 
1781, in Scotland, and soon afterward was 
brought to America by his parents. He was 
in his sixth year wlieii the family settled in 
Blacklick township. Indiana county, where 



he was reared and became engaged in farm- 
ing, spending the rest of his life there. He 
died March 2, 1846, at the age of sixty-five 
years, thirteen days. His wife, JIargaret 
(Devinney), born Oct. 7, 1793, died Nov. 27, 
1861, aged sixty-eight years, one month, twen- 
ty days. They had a family of twelve chil- 
dren, namely: Elliott, born July 8, 1812, died 
June 19, 1883; Aaron, born March 25, 1814, 
died Jan. 4, 1881; Elizabeth, bom Jan. 2, 
1816, married James Patticord; William, born 
Jan. 21, 1818, died June 16, 1885, in Ohio; 
Jane, born ilay 14, 1820, died Sept. 7, 1907, 
unmarried ; James, born March 8, 1822, lived 
at New Florence, Pa., and later went to Kan- 
sas, where he died; Eli, born April 25, 1824, 
a doctor and minister, resided at Latrobe, and 
later went to Kansas; Andrew D. was born 
Feb. 17, 1826; John, May 12, 1828: Joseph, 
March 24, 1831; David, Jan. 2, 1833; Mar- 
garet Ann, Sept. 12, 1836. 

John Ferguson, sou of James and Mar- 
garet (Devinney) Ferguson, was born May 
12, 1828, at the Ferguson homestead, and at- 
tended the Ferguson school. The land on 
which the school building stood was given by 
his father for that purpose. He began to 
assist his father when a mere boy, and con- 
tinued to follow farming and stock raising at 
the homestead all his life, making extensive 
improvements on the property during his 
ownership. During the Civil war his sym- 
pathies were with the Union, and he sei'ved 
three months in the Penns.ylvania militia. He 
was a stanch Republican, and took an active 
interest in local politics, and he held a 'num- 
ber of the township offices, serving as school 
director, supervisor, and tax collector. He 
was a leading member of the Hopewell M. E. 
Church and prominent in all its woi-k, serv- 
ing as steward, trustee and cla.ss leader. He 
died on his farm jMay 22, 1895, and is buried 
in Hopewell M. E. Church cemetery. On 
Nov. 24, 1863, at Livermore, Pa., Mr. Fergu- 
son married Sybilla Kells, who was born 
June 2, 1846, d'nnghter of Robert and Mary 
(Cunningham) Kells, the fonner a native of 
Ireland who came to America with his par- 
ents and settled in Philadelphia, later moving 
to Westmoreland county. Pa., where he passed 
the remainder of his life: he is buried at 
Livermore. Mv. Kells was a carpenter and 
boatbuilder by occupation. Mr. and Mrs. Fer- 
guson had the following children: (1) 
Frank. Ulysses, boni Dee. 12. 1864, attended 
Blairsville Academy and later was a student 
at the James Boacom private school for five 
terms. He then studied medicine and was 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



905 



in the drug business at Glitsou and is now en- 
gaged in tlie practice of medicine there. He 
married Margaret Bradley. (2) Charles D. 
is mentioned below. (3) Mary Savannah, 
born Feb. 21, 1870, married E. C. Ryder and 
lives in Pittsburg. (4) Jennie May, bom 
Nov. 23, 1872, married Thomas N. Dougherty. 
(5) George Crooks, born May 31, 1875, is a 
farmer in Indiana county, Pa. He married 
Effie Fritz. (6) Rebecca Kells, born Sept. 
13, 1878, married Roy Torrence. (7) James 
Thomas, born Oct. 10, 1883, now in Port 
Arthur, Texas, is shipping clerk for the Gulf 
Refining Company. 

On July 5, 1900, Mrs. Ferguson married 
(second) Matthew H. Henry, of Blairsville, 
Pennsylvania. 

Charles Devinney Ferguson attended the 
Ferguson school near the homestead, and sub- 
sequently worked there with his parents un- 
til 1891, when he married and started life 
on his own account. Renting the Smith farm 
he cultivated that place for a year, the next 
year farmed the Walker place, and in 1893 
moved to Burrell township, where he car- 
ried on the Sloan place for five years. In 
1898 he bought the Laughlin farm of ninety- 
eight acres (originally known as the McCrea 
farm) and there settled down to farming and 
stock raising. Ambitious and honorable, he 
has made a substantial and respected place for 
himself in the community, having been suc- 
cessful in his work and a thoroughly reliable 
and useful citizen. He still retains the coal 
.interests on the old homestead, and also has 
acquired other coal interests in the State. 

On Feb. 25, 1891, Mr. Ferguson married 
Lenora Hazlett, daughter of Lesley and Mar- 
garet (Streams) Hazlett, and they have be- 
come the parents of ten children: Alma 
(now engaged in teaching school, living at 
home), Lesley, Gladys, Lena, :Margaret, Lynn, 
Clair, Winifred, Evabel and Wayne G. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ferguson and their family are mem- 
bers of the United Presbyterian Church at 
Blairsville, and he has served as elder for 
four years. He has been deeply interested in 
politics as a progressive Republican, and has 
taken some part in the workings of the party 
in his section, having served as member of 
the township election board and as a member 
of the county Republican committee. He has 
been school director of his township for three 
years. 

A. W. CAMPBELL, merchant and justice 
of the peace of Heshbon, Indiana county, 
owner of the big "Square Deal" store in that 



town, is one of the most popular citizens of 
Brushvalley township. He is a native of 
the county, born Jan. 12, 1872, in West 
Wheatfield township, son of David and Mar- 
tha C. (Caruahan) Campbell. The father was 
also born in West Wheatfield township, where 
he was reared, and was a farmer throughout 
his life. He served on the Union side during 
the Civil war, enlisting Aug. 30, 1864, in 
Company H, 211th Regiment, and was in the 
army almost a year, being discharged May 18, 
1865. He received a gunshot wound above 
the right knee during his service. His death 
occurred Feb. 18, 1901, in West Wheatfield 
township. He was a Democrat in politics and 
in religious connection a member of the U. 
P. Church, in which he held the office of 
elder. His first wife, Nancy J. (Palmer), was 
the mother of two children: Robert, now a 
resident of Blairsville, Indiana county; and 
Polly, wife of James Brown, of Wisconsin. 
To his second marriage, with Martha C. Car- 
nahan, were born seven children: John A., 
fonnerly commissioner of Indiana county, 
who now resides in Blairsville, Pa. ; James E., 
of Pueblo, Colo. ; A. W. ; Ella M., wife of Bert 
Donnellson, of Josephine, Indiana Co., Pa. ; 
Zurah I., Mrs. W. B. Wagner, of Heshbon; 
Rosa, Mrs. James Wadsworth, of Josephine; 
and Joseph E., a teacher, of Heshbon. The 
mother died May 21, 1902. 

A. W. Campbell went to the common schools 
near home for his early education, later at- 
tending different normal schools in the coun- 
ty — a summer normal at Armagh, the Green- 
ville normal and the Indiana normal. He had 
a successful career of fourteen years as a 
school teacher, which he began when only six- 
teen years old. During this time he was an 
instructor in ungraded schools for seven years 
and for the other seven was principal of 
schools in Indiana, Cambria and Westmore- 
land counties, and for five summers trained 
teachers at summer normals held in various 
sections. In July, 1906, he became engaged 
in the mercantile business at Heshbon, own- 
ing what is widely known in his territory as 
the "Square Deal" store on Broadway, which 
as the result of his efforts to give full value 
for every expenditure is one of the most popu- 
lai'i trading places for the people in and 
around Heshbon. He has a larse stock._ reas- 
onably priced in accordance with his policy of 
doing the best possible bv his custom ers. who 
have shown their appreciation by steady pat- 
ronage. His good business judgment and 
enterprise are so generally recognized that 
for several years his services as auctioneer 



906 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



have been in great demand, and in that ca- 
pacity he has presided at many public sales 
in his own and adjoining counties. 

Mr. Campbell was a poor boy when he 
started life on his own account and whatever 
position or means he has now can be accredited 
to his own exertions. He has been successful 
not only in a financial way, but in keeping the 
good opinion and respect of all with whom 
he has been brought into contact by his scrup- 
ulous observance of the rights of others and 
his keen sense of responsibilitj' toward his 
fellow men. 

On May 1, 1910, Mr. Campbell was com- 
missioned a justice of the peace, "and has 
been dispensing law with equity and justice 
in that section of the county." This compli- 
ment to his official services appeared in the 
Indiana Progress, issue of May 22, 1912, apro- 
pos of the progressive stand he has taken on 
the marriage question. At that time he had 
just announced his intention of refusing 
thenceforth to perform a marriage ceremony 
unless the contracting parties presented him 
a certificate signed by a responsible physician, 
testifying to their physical and mental fit- 
ness. He was the first justice in this section 
to take such a step and his action caused con- 
siderable comment. 

Mr. Campbell has been a prominent mem- 
ber of the Democratic party in this part of 
Pennsylvania for years. Although this is a 
Republican section he has made a good show- 
ing as candidate on more than one occasion. 
His heart is with the new Progressive move- 
ment. He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F. and 
the United Presbyterian Church. 

JESSE J. WILLIAIISON, who is the 
owner of 196 acres of good farm and timber 
land in West Mahoning township, was born 
in South ]\Iahoning township, Indiana county, 
Oct. 6. 1841. son of William G. and Nancy 
Ann (Colkett) Williamson. 

Hiram Williamson, the paternal grand- 
father of Jesse J. Williamson, was of English 
descent and coming to what is now known as 
Indiana county settled in what is now West 
Mahoning township (then included in Ly- 
coming county'), where he secured land. He 
married a Quaker lady. Miss Evans, of Ches- 
ter county, and they spent the rest of their 
lives in agricultural pursuits in West ]\Ta- 
honing township, where they were among the 
earliest pioneers. Their children were : Hi- 
ram, Evan, William G., Mary and Sarah, all 
except William C. moving to Illinois. 

John Colkett, Ihe maternal grandfather of 



Jesse J. Williamson, was a soldier in the 
Colonial army during the war of the Revolu- 
tion, and was wounded in battle, after which 
he i-eturned to his home in eastena Pennsyl- 
vania. He followed farming during the rest 
of his life. He had five children: John, 
Robert, Nancy Ann, Maiy and Sarah. 

William G. Williamson was born in Hunt- 
ingdon county, Pa., Feb. 16, 1799, and his wife, 
Nancy Ann (Colkett), was a native of Indi- 
ana county. They became the parents of the 
following children: Hiram, deceased, lived 
to manhood in West Mahoning township ; 
John C, Louisa and Annis died when but 
a few years old, of diphtheria; William E., 
deceased, who lived in Banks township and 
carried on farming, was a soldier in Company 
A, 103d Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and 
was three times married, (first) tO' Mary 
Braughler, (second) to Elizabeth Leausure, 
and (third) to Sarah E. Horton, the last- 
named still surviving and residing in Banks 
township; Charles W., deceased, a farmer 
and stonemason of South Mahoning township, 
married Mary Work, and the.v had children, 
James 0., John P., Russell and Alice, now Mrs. 
Alex. Birnie, of Sharpsburg, Pa.; John P., 
deceased, who served as a soldier in Company 
F, 105th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
was wounded near Fair Oaks, and died there, 
where he is buried; Jesse J. is mentioned 
below ; Ann Eliza died unmarried ; Silas R., 
who served in the Civil war as a member of 
the 1st Pennsylvania Battalion, now a farmer 
of West Mahoning township, married Mary 
Stewart and (second) Annie E. Weaver, and 
has children as follows by the second mar- 
riage: Charles W. (who lives at home, fol- 
lowing farming), Otis C. (a public school 
teacher), Alverda H. and Samuel B. (both at 
home). 

Jesse J. Williamson, son of William G. Wil- 
liamson, received a common school education, 
and was reared to the occupation of agricul- 
turist, following the same on the home farm 
until after the death of his father. In 1876 
he was married to Catherine Morrow, of South 
Mahoning township, Indiana county, daugh- 
ter of David and ^largaret (Lytle) ^Morrow, 
and to this union have been born childi-en as 
follows : Edwin M. was a teacher in the pub- 
lie schools for some years, later going to 
Evans City, Pa., where he was employed in 
the oil fields; while there he contracted an 
illness which caused his death op Oct. 5. 
1906. Frank, also a teacher, is now follow- 
ing the occupation of farming. Anna May 
and Emma were graduated from the Penn- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



907 



sylvauia State normal school at Indiana, Pa., 
in the class of 1907, and have since been en- 
gaged as teachers in the public schools of 
western Pennsylvania. 

On March 31, 1865, Mr. Williamson enlisted 
in the 103d Pennsylvania Infantry, with 
which he served until the close of the war. 
On his return he resumed farming in West 
Mahoning township, where he still resides. 
Mr. Williamson cast his first vote for Abra- 
ham Lincoln, and has since that time voted 
the Republican ticket, as a rule. He has held 
minor offices in the towniship, and is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church, his 
wife being a United Presbyterian. 

LON H. SKINNER, a stonecutter and con- 
tractor of _West Mahoning township, was born 
in Porter' township, Jefferson Co., Pa., Jan, 
23, 1859, son of John and Maria (Gahagan) 
Skinner. 

Cornelius Skinner, a native of Scotland, 
came to tlie United States when eighteen years 
old, and, marrying a Miss Andrews, settled 
in Jefferson county, Pa., where he farmed 
until his death, at which time he was sixty 
years old. His widow long survived, dying 
when ninety-one years of age. They reared 
a large family, and were highly respected 
people. 

John Skinner was given the common school- 
ing of those days, attending in log cabins. 
He resided in Jefferson county until the fall 
of 1870, when he moved to Home post office, 
Indiana county, securing a farm in that vicin- 
ity. In later life, however, he resided with 
his children. In addition to farming he fol- 
lowed lumbering, and was an active man, hold- 
ing many of the township offices, being elected 
on the Democratic ticket. He was a member 
of the Methodist Church. In 1844 he married 
Maria Gahagan, and they had seven children: 
Robinson, deceased, who was a stonecutter, 
lived in West Mahoning township ; Emeline, 
who is the widow of E. Adams, lives in Punx- 
sutawney. Pa. ; James, deceased, was a farmer 
of West Mahoning township : Annie died 
young: Henry is a retired farmer of Eau 
Claire, Wis. : Martha married John Scott, of 
Sunbury, Pa. ; Lon H. is mentioned below. 

The early ancestors of Maria Gahagan, wife 
of John Skinner, came from Ireland, emigrat- 
ing to this country in an early day. They 
settled in Maryland, and from there James 
Gahagan. her father, came to Jefferson county. 
Pa., settling near what is now called Zion 
Church. He was an exemplary citizen, and 
especially active in the advancement of the 



Methodist Church, of which he was a lifelong 
member. His house was a home for the early 
day preachers, and services were often held 
there. He raised a large family, and died at 
the age of seventy-eight years; his remains 
rest in the Zion cemetery. 

Lon H. Skinner was educated in the com- 
mon schools of his native place, and remained 
with his father until he was eighteen years 
old, when he began working for himself. 
After his marriage he and his wife settled on 
his farm on the Mahoning creek, in West Ma- 
honing township, and in addition to operating 
his property Mr. Skinner has been for years 
one of the most expert stonecutters and build- 
ers of the count}'. He is at present serving 
on the school board, and takes a deep inter- 
est in politics, as a member of the Republican 
party. Mr. and Airs. Skinner are members 
of the JMethodist Church, and active in its 
good work, and are as highly respected in the 
congregation as they are in other circles 
throughout the county. 

Mr. Skinner was married to Mary Donald, 
of Westmoreland county. Pa., daughter of 
John and Mary Donald, of the same county. 
Mr. and Mrs. Skinner have had children as 
follows : Theresa, a music teacher, married 
R. M. Bond, and is now residing in Johnstown, 
Pa. ; Wilda, at home, has been a teacher for 
the last three yeare in the public schools of 
Indiana county; Edith, at home, is also a 
teacher in the public schools of this county; 
Jessie is in college at the present time; Min- 
nie is attending school and lives at home. Mr. 
Skinner has given his children good educa- 
tional advantages and has every reason to 
be pi-oud of them. 

EDWARD F. SHAULIS, M. D., of Indi- 
ana, has been in practice in that borough since 
1903, and is counted among the successful 
physicians of Indiana county. He is respected 
by all who know him, as physician or as pri- 
vate citizen, and leads a busy and useful life 
which entitles him to a place among the valu- 
able members of his community. Dr. Shaulis 
was born Feb. 3, 1873, near Bakersville, in 
Somerset county. Pa. His grandfather, Sam- 
uel Shaulis, was born and reared in Somerset 
county, and was a farmer by occupation. 

Frederick Shaiilis, the Doctor's father, was 
born in Somerset county, and like his father 
was a farmer by occupation. At the time of 
his death, which occurred in 1907, he had been 
a member of the Lutheran Church for fifty- 
seven years. He married Mary A. Pile, who 
survives him, and they became the parents 



908 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



of twelve children, three of whom are de- 
ceased. The survivors are: Anna, wife of 
Peter F. Broiigh ; Rev. Samuel A., a Lutheran 
minister now located on the old homestead in 
Jeffei-son township, Somerset Co., Pa.; Sadie, 
wife of A. J. Weimer, of Somerset county; 
Ella, wife of Dr. C. R. Bittner, of Hoovers- 
ville, Somerset county; Elizabeth, wife of S. 
E. Knupp, of Friedens, Pa. ; Edward F. ; Car- 
rie, wife of W. B. Putnam, of Jefferson town- 
ship, Somerset county; Charles, who is a pro- 
fessor in the public school at Coleta, 111. ; and 
Wesley, a farmer in Jefferson township, Som- 
erset county. 

Edward F. Shaulis attended public school 
in Jefferson township, Somerset county, and 
preparing himself for teaching followed that 
profession in his native county for five years. 
He then entered the State normal school lo- 
cated at Indiana, Pa., from which institution 
he was graduated in 1898, after which he took 
up the study of medicine, reading with Drs. 
C. R. Bittner and S. J. H. Louther, both of 
Somerset county. Entering the Eclectic Med- 
ical Institute at Cincinnati, Ohio, he was 
graduated in 1902, and the same year began 
practice on his own account, at Newcastle, 
Lawrence Co., Pa, He remained there one 
year, in 190.3 moving to the borough of In- 
diana, where he has since been located. He 
has prospered from the start, now having a 
wide practice to attend to, being one of the 
busiest physicians in this section of the county. 
He is a member and corresponding secretary 
of the Eclectic Medical Association of Penn- 
sylvania, and a member of the National Eclec- 
tic Medical Association. 

In 1901 Dr. Shaulis married Ethel Maud 
Steinrod, of Indiana county, and to them has 
been born one child, Frederic S. Dr. Shaulis 
is a member of the Lutheran Church, \yhich 
he has served officially as member of the 
board of elders. 

GEORGE FRANKLIN GAMBLE, miller, 
farmer and Civil War veteran, a resident of 
West Wheatfield township, Indiana county, is 
a son of George Washington and Mary (Wake- 
field) Gamble. 

Albert Gamble, his great-grandfather, was 
the founder of the family in the United States, 
coming here from County Antrim, Ireland. 

William Gamble, son of Albert, and grand- 
father of George Franklin Gamble, was born 
at Morgantown, W. Va., and married Jane 
Carrington, who died Jan. 22, 1849, aged sev- 
enty-nine years, two months. She was buried 
in "the Gaiiil)le and Wakefield cemeteiy in 



West Wheatfield, while her husband was laid 
to rest at Black Rock, Pa. He was an exten- 
sive brick manufacturer, and was prominent 
in business circles during a long period of 
years. They had the following children : (1) 
Jacob E., who died June 17, 1888, aged sev- 
enty-five years, seven months, and three days, 
married (first) Elizabeth Wakefield, who was 
born Aug. 24, 1808, and died Feb. 28, 1859, 
and they had six children, Harrison, Mariah, 
George, Harriet, Eliza and John M. He sub- 
sequently married (second) Catherine Lutz, 
and they had six children, Jacob, Archie, 
James, Perry, ]\Iary and Edmund R. (2) 
Harriet, who married Henry Shomo, a black- 
smith by trade, had four children, Lizzie, Jo- 
seph, Harry and Charles. (3) July. (4) 
Eliza married Ed. Milligan, of ,Blacklick 
township, and had six children, Adeline, 
Maud, Jessie, Mary, Elmore and Andrew. (5) 
George Washington is mentioned below. (6) 
John went West, where he died. 

George Washington Gamble, son of Wil- 
liam, was born in 1813, and died May 17, 1879, 
aged sixty-six years, one month, seven days. 
He married Mary Wakefield, who was bom in 
West Wheatfield township, and she died June 
17, 1879, aged sixty-eight years, five months, ■ 
eighteen days, the mother of the following 
children: John Burgoyne, who married Ag- 
nes Shomo, died Sept. 18, 1880, aged forty- 
four years, two months, eleven days; Nelson, 
born Febniary 6, 1852, who died Aug. 26, 
1861 ; George Franklin is mentioned below : 
Percy Quitman, carpenter and millwright at 
Ross Furnace, Westmoreland county, married 
ilary McBurney, of that county, and has three 
children, John M., Eleanor and Vinnie ; Mar- 
iah married James Armour, of Iowa, and has 
three children, Bruce, George and Ellen ; Jane 
married Robert Fee, of Seward, Pa., and has 
four children, Ida, Amanda, Pearl and Essie ; 
:\Ialinda, who died July 11, 1876, aged thirty- 
four years, two months, nineteen days, the 
wife of Jonathan Gorman, had three children, 
Sadie, Frank and Harry; Caroline married 
Thomas Dickie, of West Wheatfield, and had 
three children, Edward, George and Clara; 
Amanda, born July 26, 1848, died May 15, 
1887, the wife of Joseph Wagner, of Brush- 
valley, and had children, John, Bert, Clyde. 
Curtis, Sadie and Harry (born in 1887, died 
.Mav 21, 1888). 

George W. Gamble secured excellent educa- 
tional advantages in his native town of JMor- 
gantown, W. Va., and at the age of nineteen 
years went to Johnstown, Pa., where he 
learned the trade of millwriglit and miller with 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



909 



his older brother, Jacob Gamble, and together 
they erected many mills in the surrounding 
counties, George W. also following the car- 
penter's trade in Johnstown for two years. 
He then purchased Kring's Mill, in Soraei-set 
county, made numerous improvements thereto 
and subsequently sold the same to John Leh- 
man. At that time he moved to "West Wheat- 
field, Indiana county, and continued mill- 
wrighting and erecting mills until he pur- 
chased the Wakefield estate, a tract of 106 
acres, from the heirs. He was road super- 
visor for many years, and was an active sup- 
porter of the Democratic party. A man of 
temperance and probity, he Avas one of the 
founders of Bethel Methodist Episcopal 
Church, to which he was a liberal contributor, 
and in which his wife was an active worker all 
of her life. They were laid to rest in the 
Gamble and Wakefield cemetery in West 
Wakefield. For some years Mr. Gamble was 
connected with the Odd Fellows, and had 
numei'ous friends in the local lodge, as he had, 
indeed, in various other circles throughout this 
section. 

George ^Franklin Gamble, son of George W. 
Gamble, was born Feb. 9, 1841, at Kring's 
Mills, and received his education there and at 
Johnstown, Pa., and at the age of sixteen years 
went to work in the sawmill of Samuel Hart- 
man. Later he learned the millwright's trade 
with his uncle, Jacob Gamble, in West Wheat- 
field township, and there followed his trade in 
the erection of flour and grist mills. In 1878 
Mr. Gamble went to Kansas, and purchased a 
farm in Reno county, in connection with the 
operation of which he also worked at his 
trnde. In 1885 he returned to West Wheat- 
field, where he purchased Gamble's Mills and 
a tract of 160 acres, formerly owned by his 
uncle, on which he made many improvements. 
He also built a sawmill on Richard's run, a 
quai'ter of a mile north of the gi-istmill, and 
both of these he is still conducting with uni- 
form success. In addition to these enterprises, 
he is the owner of the Gamble's Mills general 
store, which is managed by hial wife and 
daughter. He was one of the organizers of 
the Gamble's Mills Telephone Company, and 
has interested himself in various other enter- 
prises. A man of strict integrity in all his 
business dealings, he has built iip a reputation 
that makes his word of more value than any 
legal parchment. Politically a Democrat, he 
is progressive in his ideas, and always re- 
serves the right to cast his vote for the man 
he deems best qualified for the office under 
consideration. A member of the Germany 



jMethodist Episcopal Church since boyhood, 
he is a steward and trustee thereof, and has 
been a Sunday school teacher for twenty 
years. In all the relations of life he is known 
as an upright and public-spirited citizen, one 
who never knowingly made an enemy and who 
never lost a friend except through death. He 
holds membership in Mead Post, No. 14, Grand 
Army of the Republic, at Rice, Kansas, by vir- 
tue of his service in Company F, 2d Battalion, 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, under Col. J. C. 
Liniuger and Capt. Dan Tinkham, in which 
he enlisted at Pittsburg, June 16, 1863. He 
participated in a number of skirmishes, but 
the greater part of his services was in guard- 
ing bridges. He was known as a good and 
faithful soldier, and one who always per- 
formed his duties cheerfully and well. 

Mr. Gamble was maiTied (first) to Mary 
Hutchinson, who was born in 1844, and died 
in 1872, daughter of Cornelius and Catherine 
(Fry) Hutchinson, and they had four chil- 
dren : Milton, who traveled all over the world 
as a member of the United States signal corps, 
now lives in the West ; Frank, living at Kan- 
sas City, Mo., mai-ried Nettie Barman, who is 
deceased ; Clinton lives in Pittsburg ; Delbert 
died at the age of twenty-one years. Mr. Gam- 
ble's second marriage was to Elizabeth Trim- 
ble, daughter of George W. and Mary Trim- 
ble, and they have had three children : Olive, 
who married Samuel Marshall and lives with 
her parents, Mr. Marshall assisting his father- 
in-law in conducting the mill, while Mrs. Mar- 
shall and her mother take care of the store; 
Pearl, who died aged twenty-two years; and 
HarrJ^ who died in infancy. 



The following notes of interest concerning 
the Gamble family were taken from a history 
of Indiana county: 

Jacob K. Gamble, son of William and Eliza- 
beth (Doyle) Gamble, was born in Morgan- 
town, W. Va., in 1808. William Gamble's 
children were : . John, deceased ; Elizabeth, 
who married Archibald Fleming; Han-iet, de- 
ceased, who married (first) John Rutter and 
(second) a Mr. Carr; William, who married 
Marian Scott; Julia A., deceased, who mar- 
ried John Hoskinson; George Washington; 
and Jacob K., who married Elizabeth Wake- 
field, deceased, and (second) Catherine Lute. 
The children of Jacob K. Gamble were as fol- 
lows — by his first wife : William H. ; Maria, 
deceased ; John M., who married Carrie Simp- 
son ; George W., who married Mary Shaffer ; 
Harriet, who married Henry Shomo; and 
Elizabeth, who married Edward Milliken. To 



910 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



the second union there were born : Jacob A. ; 
James St. Clair; ]\Iary, who married Thomas 
Gamble ; Archibald F. ; Hugh P. ; and Edwin 
R. William H. and John Gamble, of this 
family, served in the Civil war. William 
Gamble, father of Jacob K., served under Gen- 
eral Wayne in the Indian wars, and lost his 
life in the war of 1812. Jacob K. Gamble 
settled in Indiana county in 1827, and learned 
the millwright's trade, at which he worked in 
Fayette and the surrounding counties for 
several years. He purchased Gamble's Mills 
in 1830, rebuilt same in 1844, and continued to 
conduct same during the remainder of his life. 
The old mill, which stood on the site of the 
present one, was erected in 1818 by Hugh St. 
Clair. Jacob K. Gamble was one of the promi- 
nent men of his day and community and 
served one term as county commissioner and 
one as justice of the peace. 

JOHN R. SMITH, farmer and stock raiser 
of Cherryhill township, Indiana county, was 
born in Green to«^lship, this county. May 23, 
1874, son of Richard R. and Elizabeth (Stueh- 
sell) Smith. 

George W. Smith, gi-andfather of John R. 
Smith, was born in Virginia, and brought his 
family to Indiana county, Pa., in 1827, set- 
tling in Green township, where he purchased 
over one thousand acres of land, being en- 
gaged in farming and lumbering throughout 
the remainder of his life. 

Richard R. Smith, son of George W., and 
father of John R. Smith, was born in Green 
township, and continued to live on the old 
homestead for many years, eventuaUy, how- 
ever, removing to Cookport, Indiana county, 
where his death occurred in February, 1902. 
His widow still suiwives, making her home 
with a daughter, Mrs. Leda Williams, of In- 
diana. Six children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard R. Smith: Mollie, who is de- 
ceased ; two who died in infancy ; William G., 
of AVhite township, Indiana county; John R. ; 
and Leda, who married R. B. Williams, of 
Indiana. 

John R. Smith attended school in Green 
township, and worked on the old home place 
until aceompanjang his father to Cookport, 
where he was engaged in farming for eight 
years. In 1903 Mr. Smith moved to Cheriy- 
hill town.ship, here purchasing his present 
farm. He has carried on general agricultural 
operations, has been uniformly successful in 
his ventures, and at present is a director of the 
Clymer National Bank. 

In December, 1896, Mr. Smith was united in 



marriage to Catherine Gorman, who was born 
in Montgomery township, daughter of Alex- 
ander and Elizabeth (Smith) Gorman, early 
settlers of Banks and Montgomery townships, 
this county, where Mr. Gorman, who is now 
deceased, was engaged in farming. His wife, 
who still survives and resides in Indiana, bore 
him nine children, as follows: William, who 
is deceased ; Hallie, widow of John Baird, and 
now a school teacher of Pittsburg, Pa. ; Orrin, 
a resident of Montgomeiy township; Harry, 
who lives in Colorado; Maggie, the wife of 
John Wright, of Montgomery township ; Mrs. 
Smith; Lucy, wife of Clair D. Lydick, of 
Gipsy, Indiana county; Ray, a resident of 
Banks township ; and Rose, who lives with 
her mother in Indiana. 

]\Ir. and Mrs. Smith have had a family of 
seven children: Marj-, Harry, Gertrude, 
John, Jr., Ralph, Evelyn and Helen. With 
his wife and children Mr. Smith attends the 
Presbyterian Church. 

WILLIAM WALTER, general farmer and 
fruit grower of Burrell township, Indiana 
county, is also well known there iu other con- 
nections, having served in public offices, and 
he is a leading member of the Free Methodist 
Church of Blairsville. 

The Walter family is of Gennan extraction, 
but has long been settled in eastern Pennsyl- 
vania, and there Peter Walter, grandfather 
of William Walter, was born, it is supposed 
in Lebanon county. In 1817 he came west- 
ward with his family, locating in Derry town- 
ship, Westmoreland county, near what is now 
the town of Latrobe, and there spent the re- 
mainder of his life engaged in farming. He 
died at that place. His wife's name was 
Catherine. 

Peter Walter, son of Peter, above, was born 
March 21, 1817, in Lebanon county. Pa., and 
was but an infant when broiight by his par- 
ents across the Allegheny mountains. He 
grew to manhood in Derry township, near La- 
trobe, and had such limited opportunities for 
education as the subscription schools of the 
time and place afforded ; they were conducted, 
however, for only a few months during the 
winter season. From early boyhood he was 
familiar with farm work, which he followed 
all his life, and when he commenced on his 
own acco\int settled on a tract of 128 acres in 
Unity township. Westmoreland county, where 
he continued to make his home until his death. 
He was noted for his thrifty and industrious 
habits, and his un()uestionable honesty in all 
Ills transactions; was a quiet unassuming man 



HISTOKY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



911 



of temperate habits and irreproachable life, 
and a sincere member of the Mennonite Breth- 
ren Church — a good citizen and true to his 
principles in all the relations of life. In poli- 
tics he was a Republican, a firm believer in the 
doctrines of Lincoln and Blaine. He died 
Nov. 24, 1889, and his wife, Sarah (Kimmel), 
who was born April 15, 1821, in Somerset 
county. Pa., daughter of Solomon and Cather- 
ine Kimmel, died in 1908 ; they are buried in 
Unity cemetery. Nine children were bom to 
them: Daniel, born Sept. 18, 1841, died Jan. 
30, 1861; Lydia E., born Dee. 29, 1843, is 
unmarried and lives in Unity township, West- 
moreland county ; David, born Sept. 20, 1846, 
now residing in Kingman county, Kans., mar- 
ried Elizabeth Ferguson, and they had chil- 
dren, Grace, Maud, Lawrence, Jeanette and 
Corea; Caleb W., born Dec. 8, 1848, died in 
1911, married Frances McParlin, and had chil- 
dren, Rolley, Clyde and Mack; Catherine, 
born March 30, 1851, is the wife of Isaiah 
Small and resides in Unity township (thej^ 
have had two children, Lydia, deceased, and 
Dora ) ; William is mentioned below ; George 
M., born April 6, 1858, is a resident of Panola 
county, Texas, married Lizzie Victor, and has 
had three children, Laura (deceased), Milton 
and McKinley; Mary E., born Aug. 16, 1860, 
married Harry Jamison, of Hempfield town- 
ship, Westmoreland county, and has three 
children, Walter, Ray and Mabel ; Ida Sarah, 
born April 15, 1863, is unmarried and lives in 
LTnity township. 

William Walter was bom Nov. 5, 1855, in 
Unity township, Westmoreland county, and 
there passed his boyhood days on the farm. 
He attended the local public school and also 
Sewickley Academy, near Pleasant Unity, and 
in his young manhood taught school one term. 
But he preferred fanning, and for a number 
of years continued to follow that calling at 
the home place with his father, who carried 
on general agricultural pursuits and stock 
raising. There he remained until he came to 
Indiana county, in 1889, locating at his pres- 
ent home in Burrell township. He bought a 
tract of twenty-five acres, part of the Ear- 
hard farm, and began fruit culture, in which 
line he was the pioneer in the township. Now 
he has over twenty-five hundred trees, of 
different kinds, including peach, plum, cherry 
and apple, besides strawberry, raspberry and 
blackberry vines, all of which are doing well 
under his capable management. In 1911 he 
bought the Bowden-Repine farm of 135 acres, 
near his first purchase, ajid is planting part 



of that tract in fruit. The substantial dwell- 
ing house and barn were on the Earhard 
place when he settled there, but he has made 
many of the most valuable improvements, and 
his recent purchase also has begun to give evi- 
dence of his up-to-date care. By strict at- 
tention to the details of his special line of 
work, and unremitting industry in everything 
he has undertaken, he has won success, and 
his practical, intelligent methods have proved 
profitable and effective. He is a man of high 
character and thoroughly respected in his 
neighborhood, as may be judged by the fact 
that his fellow citizens have chosen him audi- 
tor (in which office he served one term) and 
school director; he has held the latter office 
four terms, and has acted as president and 
secretary of the board. In political connection 
he is a Republican, but he is independent in 
voting, supporting the men and measures he 
prefers, regardless of party. 

In 1887 Mr. Walter married Nettie B. Shu- 
maker, who was born at Deanville, Armstrong 
Co., Pa., daughter of Isaac and Lucinda (Shu- 
maker) Shumaker, and she has been a de- 
voted helpmate. Six children have been born 
to this marriage : Goldie M. was educated in 
the public schools and at the Indiana State 
normal school, has taught three terms in Bur- 
rell township and three terms in Kingman 
county, Kans., and is now teaching at Homer 
City, Indiana Co., Pa. ; James G. Blaine died 
when thirteen years old; Mary Velma re- 
ceived a public school education and is now 
living at home ; Russell D. was educated in 
the public schools and lives at home ; Zell and 
Glenn Shumaker are at home. Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter and their family are members of the 
Free Methodist Church at Blairsville and 
take an active part in all its work ; he is serv- 
ing at present as class leader, steward and 
superintendent of the Sunday school. 

CLARENCE R. SMITH, of Indiana, presi- 
dent of the Indiana Bent Rung Ladder Com- 
pany, and otherwise identified with the busi- 
ness life of the borough, belongs to the fourth 
generation of his family which has resided in 
Indiana county. He was born in this county 
July 5, 1877, and is a great-grandson of Rich- 
ard Smith, who came hither when this region 
was a wilderness and took up large tracts of 
land. He was a member of the Society of 
Friends. 

Richard W. Smith, son of Richard, was bom 
in West Virginia, and came to Indiana county 
with his father. He became engaged in saw- 



912 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



iiiilling aud luiuberiug, doing an extensive 
business for his day. 

Ellis ti. Smith, son of Richard W., was 
born in Indiana county and here passed all 
his life. Like his father he did a large busi- 
ness sawmilling and lumbering, and was also 
engaged in farming. He married a native of 
Cleartield county, this State, Ruth Ettie 
Weaver, and they became the parents of three 
children : Siviter W., Jay C. and Clarence R. 
The father was a member of the Odd Fellows' 
fraternity. 

Clarence R. Smith received his education 
in the public schools of Indiana county. At 
the age of nineteen he began business life on 
his owh account, engaging in various lines, aud 
in 190-1 became president of the Indiana Bent 
Rung Ladder Company, an association which 
he has maintained to the present. This com- 
pany has built up a flourishing business, giv- 
ing employment to between forty and fifty 
hands, so that it is one of the factors in the 
material welfare of the borough. Mr. Smith 
is a stockholder in and director of several 
other thriving enterprises in this locality, 
where he is looked upon as an energetic aud 
reliable citizen, one of those whose ability and 
resource conserve the best interests of any com- 
munity. He is a Mason, belonging to Blue 
Lodge No. 313, F. & A. M., of Indiana, of 
which he is a past master. 

In February, 1903, Mr. Smith married 
Mabel Dickie, daughter of Joseph Dickie, of 
Indiana. They have two children, Genevra 
Ruth and Helen Louise. 

J. BLAIR SUTTON, register and recorder 
of Indiana county, Pa., son of James M. and 
Martha (Stuchell) Sutton, was born in In- 
diana borough. His grandfather, Peter Sut- 
ton, was a native of Indiana county, where he 
was engaged in farming until his death, in 
1865. Peter Sutton was married to Nancy 
Fisher, of Dauphin county. Pa., who survived 
him, dying in 1897. They were both highly 
respected members of the Presbyterian 
Church. 

James il. Sutton, father of the subject of 
this sketch, began life on his father's farm in 
Indiana county. In 1861 he enlisted, becom- 
ing a private in Company E, 148th Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. His gal- 
lant and meritorious conduct soon won him 
promotion to the rank of lieutenant. He took 
part in all the many battles in which the gal- 
lant 148t]i partic-ipated, including Gettysburg 
and Spottsylviuiia Court House, at which lat- 



ter engagement he received the wound which 
ended his service as a soldier, causing the loss 
of a leg, and eventually, after years of intense 
suffering, ending his life. Returning to his 
native county, James il. Suttou located in 
Plumville and there engaged in various enter- 
prises until 1869, when he was elected county 
treasurer, which office he filled with ability 
and fidelity, making his residence in Indiana 
borough. He died in 1882 in a Philadelphia 
hospital, where he had gone for treatment 
of his wound. His soldier record was excel- 
lent, lu the same regiment served his three 
brothers, Joseph, Ayers and Capt. John, all 
of whom, with the exception of John, are 
now deceased. Mr. Sutton was an elder in 
the Presbyterian Church from the age of 
thirty until his death. He was prominent in 
the locar G. A. R. Post, No. 28, of Indiana 
borough. 

James M. Sutton was twice married, his 
first wife, Martha (Stuchell), dying at a com- 
paratively early age. Her children were: 
Clara B., deceased; Emma (wife of Ernest 
Stewart), deceased; Frank, who died in in- 
fancy, and John Blair. His second wife was 
Elizabeth Wilson, daughter of Samuel Wilson. 
By this union there was one child, Ella ]May, 
who died in infancy. Mrs. Elizabeth (Wil- 
son) Sutton was not only a devoted wife, but 
was also an exceptionally kind and loving 
mother to her stepchildren, who thoroughly 
appreciated her goodness and conscientious 
care. 

J. Blair Sutton received his education prin- 
cipally in the public schools. Before he was 
ten years of age he was appointed court page 
by Judge John P. Blair (for whom he was 
named) . Two years later Judge Harry White 
reappointed him to that position, iu which 
capacity he served until 1892, when he be- 
came a clerk in the .store of A. W. Wilson & 
Sou, aud so continued until he entei'ed the law 
office of Hon. George W. Hood as a student, 
in 1897. In 1898, during the Spanish-Ameri- 
can war, Mr. Sutton helped to organize Com- 
pany B, 21st Regiment, Pennsylvania Pro- 
visional Guards, was elected second lieutenant, 
and served as such until the regiment was 
mustered out of the service. In 1902 he was 
appointed deputy register and recorder of 
Indiana county. In this capacity he served 
six yeai-s, and by his genial and accommo- 
dating ways, and careful and efiScient dispatch 
of public business, fairly earned the large 
majority by which he was elected register and 
recorder at the end of his service as deputy. 
In 1911 he was reelected, lu-ai-ticalh- without 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



!)i;j 



opposition. Mr. Sutton is a member of the 
Order of Elks. He served Indiana Lodge 
one year as secretaiy. He is also prominent 
in the affairs of the Cosmopolitan Club, of 
which organization he has been treasurer for 
more than fifteen years. 

Mr. Sutton continues to perform the duties 
of the oiSces of register of wills, recorder of 
deeds and clerk of the Orphans' court in a 
manner highly satisfactory to the people of 
the county. He is also a director of the First 
National Bank of Indiana. He stands high 
in the esteem of his fellow citizens in every 
relation of life. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN EVANS, a well- 
known agriculturist of Brushvalley township, 
Indiana county, prominent also in other con- 
nections, was born there Nov. 9, 1861. A 
citizen whose activities have made him valu- 
able to the community, he bears worthily a 
name which has long been synonymous with 
good citizenship in this section. 

Mr. Evans is descended from one of the 
oldest pioneer families in Brushvalley. The 
Evanses are of Welsh extraction, the founder 
of the family in this country, Hugh Evans, 
having been a native of Cardiff, Wales, who 
crossed the Atlantic when a young man, wor^k- 
ing for his passage on the vessel. Among the 
passengers was a young English girl named 
Hannah Dill, with whom he fell in love, and 
they were married when they landed at Phila- 
delphia. They came west to the Welsh set- 
tlement near Ebensburg, in Cambria county, 
Pa., where they remained for a short time, 
until they came to Indiana county, locating 
in Brushvalley township. They were among 
the first settlers there. Settling in the wildei'- 
ness, Mr. Evans built his log cabin and set to 
work clearing up the land. He remained but 
a short time on his first farm, buying a 400- 
acre tract, all brush aud timber, near the site 
of Meehanicsburg, upon which he settled 
down to farming. Much of this land is still 
in the family name. Here he built a dwelling 
house and barn, and also erected a saw and 
grist mill, the first of the kind in Brushereek 
valley. The mill was of stone, aud stood on 
Brush creek about three quarters of a mile be- 
low the present site of Meehanicsburg, and 
for many years was a prominent landmark. 
He also owned a distillery. He worked hard 
and faithfully, prospered in his own affairs, 
and did his full duty as a citizen, being one 
of the enterprising and progi-essive men of 
his day and generation. He was a strong 



abolitionist. He died on his farm in 1849, at 
the age of seventy years, and was buried in 
what is known as the Evans graveyard. He 
was a member of the Baptist Church, the first 
Baptist to settle in the township. His first 
wife died leaving children as follows: Ann, 
who married John Kelly aud (second) James 
Stewart ; John ; Hugh, who died at Altoona ; 
Mary, who married Henry Grumbling; Eliza- 
beth (Betsy), who first mai'ried Joseph Mc- 
Nutt; Evan, who lived in Brushvalley; Wil- 
liam, who married Susan Wilkins ; aud James, 
who died in Center township. Mr. Evans 
married for his second wife Esther Cresswell, 
and she bore him three children: Ellen, Re- 
becca and Lucinda (who married Rev. A. B. 
Runyan, a well-known Baptist minister of 
Meehanicsburg). 

John Evans, eldest son of Hugh Evans, was 
educated in Brushvalley township and there 
grew to manhood ou the farm. Receiving 
250 acres of land from his father, he settled 
down to farming and stock raising, made 
many improvements on his property and was 
an industrious and successful man through- 
out his long life. He was an honored resident 
of his locality, a member and deacon of the 
Baptist Church, and in politics a Whig and 
Republican in turn, and a strong admirer of 
the martyred President Lincoln. During the 
Civil war his sympathies were with the Union 
cause, and his two sons went out as Union sol- 
diers. He died on his farm at the age of 
seventy years, seven months, aud is buried in 
the family lot iu the Evans cemetery. He 
married in Brushvalley township Elizabeth 
Sanderson, a native of Hagerstown, Md., 
daughter of Thomas Sanderson, who settled 
in that township. Mrs. Evans was also a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church. She was the 
mother of eight children: Benjamin, men- 
tioned below; Emily, who married John Pin- 
ley, and died in IBlairsville ; Lucinda, who 
married William Conrad, and is now a widow 
residing in East Wheatfield township ; Susan, 
who married David Overdorff, both being de- 
ceased ; Elizabeth, who married Thomas Greg- 
ory, and died in Franklin, Pa. ; Rebecca, who 
married Finley Campbell, and died in Johns- 
town; John Sanderson, who now makes his 
home in Homer City; and Maria, who married 
John Bracken, and died in Indiana county, 
Pennsylvania. 

Benjamin Evans, son of John, born Feb. 16, 
1826, on the homestead farm in Brushvalley 
township, attended the local school. He took 
up farming as an occupation, following in his 
father's footsteps. Settling on the 100-acre 



914 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



tract of land now owned bj' his son Benjamin 
F. Evans, he improved the land, erected a 
dwelling house and barn, and added to the 
value of the property in many other ways. 
As he prospered he bought another place, of 
126 acres, known as the Isaiah Bonner farm, 
which he gave later to his son John W. He 
spent his life in agi-icultural pui'suits, carry- 
ing on stock raising as well as general farm- 
ing, and died on his farm in Api'il, 1895, at 
the age of sixty-nine years, three months. He 
was buried in the Evans cemetei-y near Me- 
chanicsburg. Mr. Evans was one of those men 
of unassuming disposition but strong char- 
acter whose lives, following what they deem 
oulj' the simple paths of duty, have a lasting 
effect on the welfare of the community. He 
was intelligent and well read and took an in- 
terest in all things which tended to promote 
the general good. During the Civil war he 
fought for the Union cause as a member of the 
6th Heavy Artillery. He served five years 
as school director of his township, and was an 
active church member, belonging to the M. 
E. Church, which he served as class leader 
and steward. In politics he was a Republi- 
can. Mr. Evans married Margaret Finley, 
of Brushvalley township, daught&r of David 
and Margaret (McCormack) Finley, and they 
had three children, namely: John W., now 
retired and living at Homer City, Pa. ; Mar- 
garet J., who married Frank Stake, of Cherry- 
hill township (both are deceased) ; and Ben- 
jamin F. The mother died in 1901 while liv- 
ing with her son Benjamin and is buried in 
the same cemetery as the father. She was a 
member of the M. E. Church. 

Benjamin Franklin Evans obtained his edu- 
cation in the public schools of the home neigh- 
borhood. From early boyhood he worked on 
the farm with his parents, and, continuing to 
make his home there, took charge of the 
homestead after his father's death and 
cared for his widowed mother. In time 
he bought other land in the township, and 
is now cultivating over two hundred acres, 
engaging in farming and stock raising on a 
large scale. He built his present home and re- 
built the barn which his father erected, and 
which wa.s destroyed by fire. Mr. Evans is 
thoroughly enterprising, and vinder his well- 
directed labors his farm has become one of 
the best cultivated in his section of the county. 
He has shown his public spirit by his efficient 
work in the township offices to which he lias 
been chosen by his fellow citizens. During his 
olovpii years' .service as member of the school 
board he has been president of that body for 



several years; he has been assessor for one 
term. Mr. Evans has been a stanch Repub- 
lican and is an ardent supporter of Roose- 
velt and the principles he stands for. In le- 
ligion he is a member of the M. E. Church, 
of which he is a trustee. As the representa- 
tive of a family whose members have always 
been regarded as estimable citizens he is liv- 
ing up to the obligations of an honored name, 
connected for several generations with the 
best element in the community. 

On Oct. IS, 1883, Mr. Evans married Clara 
B. Hileman, who was born in Bnishvalley 
township, daughter of George and Louisa 
Hileman. They have had a famil}- of ten 
cliildren : George S., a farmer of Brushvalley 
township, who married Mary Appleton; 
Charles, a raih-oad man, who resides at ]\Ians- 
field, Ohio; Louisa, Bessie and Eleanor, at 
home; Marion, who died when sixteen years 
old; Elizabeth, at home; Dick; Ruth, and 
Boyd. 

ANDREW JACKSON CUM.AIINS. who is 
now living retired on his farm in Center town- 
ship, is a descendant of one of the oldest pio- 
neer families of Indiana county, Pa., and was 
born on the homestead farm where he still re- 
sides June 22, 1844. The family came hither 
from Virginia. 

David Cummins, the great-grandfather of 
Andrew J. Cummins, was the first of the 
name to come to Indiana county. He was 
born in Rockingham county, Va.. where he 
grew to manhood and came to what is now 
"White township prior to the Revolutionary 
war. He settled on a tract of 400 acres, which 
was then a wilderness, and is now known as 
the Adam ]\Iikesell place. Here he erected a 
little rough log hut and with his young wife 
took up the life of a pioneer, two of his chil- 
dren being born in this primitive little cabin 
in the wilderness. In 1777 the little band of 
settlers was driven from the new home by the 
outrages of the Indians, Mrs. Cummins hiding 
her pewter plates and various other articles 
in Spring run, while her husband secreted his 
saws and other tools and implements. Put- 
ting the remaining household effects on a 
horse, with his wife and two young children 
on another animal, Mr. Cummins set out with 
his gun on his shoulder, driving the cow. and 
made his way back to his native State, al- 
though a stop was made at Wallace fort. In 
Virginia the rest of the children of this pio- 
neer couple were born, and there Mr. Cummins 
spent the remainder of his life. His widow 
and children returned to Indiana county to 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



915 



the place of their first settlement, and there 
she continued to make her home for some years. 
Finally she removed to the home of her son 
William, and there her death occurred. The 
children of David Cummins were as follows: 
William, born in 1775, who settled on Crooked 
creek, in Rayne township, Indiana county, 
after the return of the family from Virginia ; 
John, born in 1777; Mary, who married 
Charles Morrow, and settled in Ohio; Eliza- 
beth, who married Jeremiah Brown, of In- 
diana; and David, who settled in Crawford 
county, Ohio. 

John Cumjnins, son. of David, and grand- 
father of Andrew J. Cummins, was born in 
the little log home in White township, in 1777, 
and was but an infant when taken by his 
mother to Virginia. When he was fourteen 
years of age, in 1791, he was brought back to 
Indiana county, and continued to reside at 
home until 1807, at which time he purchased 
1.200 acres of land, now known as a part of 
the Harbrage tract. Here he built a log house 
aud barn, and later, in 1814, the present 
dwelling was erected, numerous other im- 
provements being also made. By hard work 
Mr. Cummins managed to clear up a large 
part of the homestead, but he died in 1827, at 
the comparatively early age of fifty years, and 
is buried in Bethel Church cemetery, in Cen- 
ter township. In politics he was a Democrat. 
Mr. Cummins married Nellie Todd, who was 
a native of Ireland, daughter of Samuel Todd, 
and she died on the farm and was buried in 
the same cemetery. They had the following 
children: Susanna, who married Samuel 
Stewart, of Center township ; Jane, who mar- 
ried Archibald Stewart, of Greenville, Pa. ; 
David ; Samuel, who was a farmer of Center 
township ; William, who was a stock raiser 
of Tipton, Iowa, which town he named; John 
D., who settled at New Philadelphia, Ohio, 
was a congressman from that State, and died 
in 1849, at Milwaukee, Wis., from the effects 
of cholera; and Margaret and EUen, who 
died unmarried. 

David Cummins, son of John, and father of 
Andrew J. Cummins, was born July 4, 1804, 
and was educated in the subscription schools 
before the advent of free schools. He gi-ew 
to manhood on the home farm and made agri- 
cultural pursuits his life work, and always 
remained on the homestead, acquiring 400 
acres of land. He built barns, made exten- 
sive improvements on his place, and was 
known as one of the good practical farmers 
and stock raisers of his locality. He died on 



the farm July 30, 1877, at the age of seventy- 
three years, and was buried in the old ceme- 
tery in Center township. He was a stanch 
Democrat, a strong admirer of Andrew Jack- 
sou, and for a number of years was captain of 
the local militia. He belonged to the Presby- 
terian Church. David Cummins married 
Mary Wilson, who was bom in Center town- 
ship, Jan. 27, 1810, daughter of John Wilson, 
and her death occurred April 10, 1888, in her 
seventy-ninth year. She was buried in Green- 
wood cemetery, at Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. 
Cummins had the following children: John 
D., bom Dec. 19, 1831, died at Crooked Creek, 
Rayne township, Sept. 11, 1906; William, 
bom March 28, 1834, captain during the Civil 
war in the 78th Regiment, Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteer Infantry, is now living retired at Shel- 
by, Ohio; Joseph, born Oct. 16, 1835, died 
April 15, 1858 ; Caroline, born June 11, 1838, 
married Joseph Repine, and resides at Blairs- 
viile, Pa. ; Thomas Benton, bom April 19, 
1841, was a farmer of Center township, and 
died March 28, ] 903 ; Andrew Jackson is men- 
tioned below; Elizabeth, born May 27, 1848, 
is the widow of Dr. S. B. Thomas, and lives 
in Conemaiigh township, Indiana county. 

Andrew Jackson Cummins attended tlie 
little log schoolhcuse in his district during 
the winter terms, which lasted three months, 
and his summers were spent in assisting with 
the hard work of the home farm. The oppor- 
tunities for obtaining a good education were 
decidedly limited, but by home study and 
close observation he managed to acquire good 
mental training. He continued to reside with 
his parents, helping them to run the home 
farm and caring for them during their de- 
clining years, thus doing his full duty as a 
son. At the present time Mr. Cummins is 
operating 157 acres, on which he has made 
numerous improvements, and devotes his at- 
tention to general farming and stock raising. 
Mr. Cummins has been quite active in educa- 
tional affairs, having served for twelve years 
as a member of the school board, during nine 
years of which he was treasurer of that body, 
and has also been auditor of the township for 
three years. He is a stanch Democrat in his 
political views. 

In December, 1875. Mr. Cummins was mar- 
ried to Margaret Peddicord, who was born in 
Brushvalley township, Indiana county, daugh- 
ter of John Peddicord. Two children have 
been born to this union: Joseph Todd, bom 
March 25, 1885, now operates the homestead; 
Mary Blanche, bom Dec. 16, 1888, married 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Ralph D. Cuiumius, resides at Derry, "West- 
moreland county, and has one child, Margaret. 

ULYSSES GRANT NELSON, who owns 
and operates the Maple Valley farm in Brush- 
valley township, is rated as one of the most 
enterprising agi-iculturists of his section of 
Indiana county. He is a native of Armstroni? 
county, Pa., born Aug. 22, 1871, near Atwood, 
son of Samuel Nelson and grandson of An- 
drew Nelson. 

Andrew Nelson, the grandfather, was a 
farmer and land owner near Elderton, Arm- 
strong count.y, where he followed fanning all 
his active life. His childi'en were : William ; 
Andrew; one son who died of starvation in 
Libby prison during the Civil war; Samuel; 
Mary, and Hannah. 

Samuel Nelson, father of Ulysses Grant 
Nelson, was born near Elderton ilay 22, 1827, 
and there made his home, following farming, 
until 1871. In that year he moved with his 
wife and family to near Atwood, in Plum- 
creek to\^Tiship, Armstrong county, where he 
farmed for eight years, owning his land, which 
he sold when he moved to Indiana. Indiana 
county. For a year he lived on a farm east 
of that borough, in 1880 settling on the Kauff- 
man place, in White township, Indiana coun- 
ty, n tract of 109 acres where he resided for 
twenty-one years, engaged in farming. Dur- 
ing that period he erected all the buildings 
on the place and made many other improve- 
ments. In 1901 he moved to Mechanicsburg, 
in Brushvalley township, where he entered 
the hotel business as proprietor of the "Nel- 
son Hotel," and also kept a livery and feed 
stable in connection. After nine years there 
he gave up the hotel and settled on a farm 
in Brushvalley township for a year, at the 
end of that time returning to Armstrong 
county and taking up his residence" with his 
sister. He died not long afterward, April 
22, 1911, in his seventy-fourth year, and is 
buried at Elderton. I\Tr. Nelson was a stftnch 
Repiiblican in political faith, and always took 
considerable interest in public matters. While 
at Mechanicsburg he served as a member of 
the borough council, was school director of 
the borough, and also held other local offices. 
He was a member of the Baptist Church, and 
served as deacon of the church at Indiana. 
On Nov. 29, 1855, Mr. Nelson was married in 
Armstrong county to Agnes Jane Johnson, 
daucrhter of John Johnson. She died Feb. 4, 
189.3, in White township, and was buried in 
Oakland cemetery at Indiana. To this mar- 
riage were born eight children: jMargaret M., 



born Nov. 27, 1856, married Milton Kerr and 
had one child, Harry A., dying when he was 
born, in March, 1876 (he lives in Erie, Pa., 
and is engaged in the automobile business) ; 
Jennie j\I., boi-n Jan. 28, 1858, married Jacob 
Burkett March 20, 1880 ; Sloan Alexander was 
born Aug. 28, 1860; George W., born Aug. 
10, 1862, removed to Kansas; Charles Sum- 
ner, born Oct. 6, 1865, lives in Pittsburg, Pa. ; 
Laura Belle, born June 24, 1867, died Feb. 7, 
1901; Daniel, born March 18, 1869, died in 
infancy; Ulysses Grant was born Aug. 22, 
1871. On March 1, 1894, Mr. Nelson married 
(second) Nannie Sweeny, at Morrellville, Pa., 
and three children were born to this union: 
Bessie l!. (bom Aug. 8, 1895), Blanch Cula. 
and Bliss. 

Ulysses Grant Nelson obtained his educa- 
tion in the public schools of the various lo- 
calities where the family lived during his 
boyhood, principally in White township, In- 
diana county. He worked on the farm with 
his father until he was twenty-two years old, 
at which time he married. After spending 
pnother year on his father's farm he went to 
Homer City, remaining there for a year, and 
then settled on the Brandon fann in Center 
township, upon which he lived for two yeai-s. 
He then located on Mrs. Jaeoby's farm in 
Wliite to^vuship, a tract of 110 acres which 
he farmed for a year, the next three years 
living on his father's place in White town- 
ship. In 1901 he moved to the J\IcDonald 
farm in Brushvalley township, where he spent 
one year, in 1902 buying the Maple Valley 
farm in the same township, where he has since 
made his home. This property consists cf 
eighty-six acres, formerly owned by George 
Risinger. ]\Ir. Nelson has improved it gr.-^atly 
since it came into his possession. He follows 
general farming and stock raising, and by 
hard work has Earned success and the respect 
of all his fellow men. He has served as treas- 
urer of Biiishvalley township, and is a citizen 
who enjoys the coufidence of all who know 
him. 

On May 3, 1893, Mr, Nelson was married 
to Carrie' May McNutt. of Homer City, this 
county, daughter of William and Lucinda J. 
(MeKissen) McNutt, and they have had four 
children : Ethel Claire, born April 19, 1894, 
formerly a student in the summer normal 
school at Mechanicsburg, now a school teacher 
in Center township ; Viola Pearl, born June 
2G, 1896; Ahnn Blair, born July 20, 1897; 
and Mary •l\Iar.iorie, born March 22, 1899. 
The family are members of the M. E. Church. 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Mr. Nelson is a Republican in poUtics and 
a stanch supporter of the principles of his 
party. 

AARON W. EliDER, farmer and justice 
of the peace in East Mahoning township, was 
born Feb. 1, 1851, in North Mahoning town- 
ship, Indiana Co., Pa., a son of John Reed 
and Lettice E. (Work) Elder, and a grand- 
son of Robert Elder. 

Great-grandfather Elder was born in Ire- 
laud about 1725, and emigrated to America 
in 1750. Although he claimed the United 
States as his home after settling in Pennsyl- 
vania, he made several visits to his native 
land. He had been a sailor and was able to 
work as such on the vessels across the ocean, 
and thus did not entirely break away from 
his native place. His first settlement was 
in the Path valley, in Franklin county, Pa., 
and he later moved to Center county and still 
later to Spruce Creek, in Huntingdon county. 

Robert Elder, grandfather of Aaron W. 
Elder, was born Feb. 9, 1790, and died Jan. 
29, 1859. He married Elizabeth Reed, who 
was born April 9, 1791, and died Aug. 25, 
1873, and they had the following children: 
Jane, born Jan. 28, 1817, died Dec. 4, 1866 ; 
David Watt, bom Aug. 12, 1818, died July 
29, 1820; Margaret, bom Jan. 24, 1821, died 
Aug. 18, 1823; John Reed, bom April 1, 
1823, died May 19, 1904; David Watt (2), 
bom Aug. 22, 1825, died Nov. 24, 1894; Mary 
Ann, born Dec. IS, 1827, died Feb. 5, 1911 ; 
Elizabeth, born March 14, 1830, died IMay 
19, 1913 ; Robert Boggs, born April 15, 1832, 
died June 7, 1861; Margaret, born Sept. 18, 
1834, died Feb. 10, 1842. Robert Elder fol- 
lowed farming as his occupation in life, own- 
ing a farm of 100 acres in East Mahoning 
township. 

John Reed Elder, son of Robert Elder, 
was bom in Spruce Creek, Huntingdon Co., 
Pa., April 1, 1823. He was a farmer and 
owned land in North Mahoning township, 
which he sold in the spring of 1860, when he 
came to East Mahoning township and took 
charge of his father's farm on which he re- 
mained until the close of his life, his death 
occurring May 19, 1904. He was twice mar- 
ried. On April 4, 1850, he was united to 
Lettice Ewing Work, who was bom April 
1, 1833, and died June 10, 1854; she was 
buried in the Mahoning cemetery. They had 
two sons born to them, Aaron W. and David 
Harris. The latter, born June 17, 1852, is 
a resident of Salt Lake City, Utah, and mar- 
ried Amy Gray, of Rome, N. Y. The sec- 



ond man-iage of John Reed Elder took place 
on March 17, 1857, to Maiy Ann Work, who 
was a cousin of his first wife. She was bom 
March 13, 1826, and died March 2, 1907, 
leaving no issue. John Reed Elder and his 
second wife were interred in the Richmond 
cemetery. In his early political life he was 
a Republican, but later voted, according to 
his convictions of right, with the Prohibition 
party. Occasionally he accepted local ofiSces, 
serving his township as supervisor and school 
director. 

Aaron W. Elder acquired his education in 
the schools of East Mahoning township and 
in the meanwhile gave his father assistance 
on the home fai-m, continuing thus until he 
was twenty-one years old. Then he engaged 
in lumbering, and finding it profitable car- 
ried on the same Line for twenty years, spend- 
ing four of these in the State of Colorado. 
In June, 1892, he returned to East Mahon- 
ing township and took charge of the old home- 
stead farm, and has continued there ever 
since, devoting himself to the carrying on of 
the usual farm industries. 

On Jan. 25, 1872, Mr. Elder was married 
to Cyrena C. Williamson, a daughter of Hi- 
ram and Lydia (Pierce) Williamson, formerly 
of Jefferson county. Pa. Six children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Elder, namely: 
Lettice, who was born Feb. 5, 1874, mar- 
ried William Collins, of Baltimore, Md., and 
(lied Feb. 6, 1893; Lydia Mabel, born July 
14, 1877, married C. W. Vamer, and they 
live at Big Run, Jefferson Co., Pa.; Lulu 
Myrtle, bom Nov. 7, 1880, married Ira Drum- 
mond, and they reside at Johnstown, Pa.; 
Ijysle Reed, born April 8, 1884, lives in the 
State of Washington, making a name for him- 
self in that wonderful part of the country; 
Eugene Everett, born May 10, 1886, who re- 
mains at home, assisting his father, married 
lone Frederick, of South Mahoning township ; 
David Watt, bom Nov. 25, 1896, resides at 
liome. 

Mr. Elder is a broad-minded, thinking man, 
temperate in all things, and gives his polit- 
leal support to the Prohibition party. He 
stands high in the esteem of his fellow citi- 
zens, as has been shown by their frequent 
selection of him for responsible public offices, 
and he has served his township nine years as 
a school director, one year as supervisor and 
fifteen years as a justice of the peace. In 
all movements that give certain promise of 
.'jubstantial benefit to his section Mr. Elder's 
cooperation may be counted on. He is a mem- 



918 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



ber of the United Presbyterian Church of 
Richmond, of which he has been an elder for 
thirty years. 

TODD R. BODEN, M. D., physician and 
surgeon at the Jacksonville mines, Mclntyre, 
Young township, Indiana county, was born in 
Kiskiminetas township, Armstrong Co., Pa., 
son of James B. and Emily (Caldwell) Boden. 
He is a member of a family of Scotch-Irish 
extraction. 

John Boden, the great-grandfather of Dr. 
Boden, and founder of the family in America, 
came from Bothwell Castle, Scotland, and 
settled in what is now White township, Indi- 
ana Co., Pa., where he became a land owner 
and spent the rest of his life in agricultural 
pursuits. He married a Miss Marks, and they 
had the following children: James; John; 
Samuel; William; Margaret; Sally; Jane, 
who married Jacob Peeler, and Polly, who 
married Thomas Lucas. 

Samuel Boden, son of John, was born in 
White township in 1800, and there grew to 
manhood, subsequently removing to Arm- 
sti-ong county, where he rented a farm. Later 
he purchased land there, in South Bend town- 
ship, on which he made numerous improve- 
ments, and there spent the remainder of his 
life, dying in 1854, at the age of fifty-four 
years; "he was buried at Curry Run cemetery. 
He was a member of the Presbyterian Church. 
Samuel Boden married Elizabeth Cowan, 
daughter of John Cowan, and she died in 
Kiskiminetas township, and was laid to rest 
in Ridge View cemetery, at Eldersridge. 
Their children were: John, deceased, who 
was a Union soldier during the Civil war; 
Mary, who died in youug womanhood; Mar- 
garet, who died unmarried ; Esther, who mar- 
ried David Wray, of Ainnstrong county; 
James B. ; George Washington, who resides in 
Kiskiminetas township, Annstrong county, 
and John, who died young. 

James B. Boden, son of Samuel, and father 
of Dr. Boden, was born Dec. 10, 1837, and 
received his education in the public schools 
and Eldersridge academy, under Dr. Donald- 
son. Ho worked with his father until the 
latter 's death, and then continued to reside 
with his mother until Feb. 23, 1864, when he 
enlisted at C.reensburg, Pa., in Company D, 
14th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, Capt. 
William W. Murphy, Colonel Sehoonmaker, 
of Pittsburg. Contracting illness, he was con- 
fined to the hospital at Leavenworth. Kans., 
and received his honorable discharge Aug. 24, 
1865. Mr. Boden then retui-ned to his home 



and took up the peaceful occupation of tilling 
the soil in Kiskiminetas township, Armstrong 
county, on the homestead, subsequently buy- 
ing a farm of fifty-one acres, which he oper- 
ated until 1893. At that time he located 
on his present farm at Eldersridge, in South 
Bend township, near the Indiana county line, 
where he has 115 acres of land in a high 
state of cultivation. He is .still an active 
farmer, and one of the best citizens of his 
community. Formerly a Republican, he now 
gives his support to the Prohibition party. 
He is an elder of the Presbyterian Church at 
Eldersridge. 

On April 6, 1869, James B. Boden was mar- 
ried at Saltsburg, Pa., to Emily Caldwell, 
who was born jMareh 7, 1843, daughter of 
James and Margaret (Crawford) Caldwell. 
and the.v have had the following cliildren : 
Alfred W., bom Dee. 13, 1869. formerly a 
teacher in the public schools and now a 
farmer of South Bend toismfship, Armstrong 
count.y, was married Sept. 10, 1896, to 
Mary E. Hindman; Sigournev Blanche, born 
Feb." 4, 1871, died Oct. 26, 1878 ; Charles C, 
born Aug. 5, 1872, died Nov. 16, 1878 ; Prof. 
Samuel F., born Dee. 23, 1874, has been an 
instractor in schools in Armstrong and Indi- 
ana counties and is now principal of the Iselin 
schools: James C, his twin, an undertaker 
and real estate man of Saltsburg, Pa., was 
married ]\Iay 1, 1907, to Nannie M. McBride : 
Todd R. and Wallace C. were bom April 23. 
1884, the latter d.>Tng June 10, 1884; Cordie 
Emily, born May 10, 1887, is residing with 
her parents. 

Todd R. Boden received his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of Kiskiminetas 
township, following which he attended El- 
dersridge academy under Thomas T. Gealey. 
There he was gi-aduated, and at the age of 
eighteen years began teaching school. He 
continued as an educator for six years in 
Armstrong and Indiana counties, and then 
entered the Western Pennsjdvania I'niver- 
sity at Pittsburg, where he spent two years. 
Subsequently he became a student in Jeffer- 
son Medical College, Philadelphia, from 
which he gi-aduated with the degree of ]M. 
D., in May, 1910, and became assistant to 
Dr. Clark, "at Emest, Pa. In April, 1911, he 
entered practice on his own account in what 
is now the mining to-\vn of Mclntyre, in 
Young to'ivnship, and in addition to earing 
for the medical needs of one hundred and 
fifty families in the immediate vicinit.v, he 
has a large country practice. Dr. Boden is 
devoted to his profession, is interested in the 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



919 



town and its people, and is constantly striving 
to better local conditions in every possible 
way. He is a Republican in his political 
views, but reserves the right to vote for the 
candidate whom his judgment tells him is 
best fitted for the ofSce. His religious views 
are those of the Presbyterian Church. Dr. 
Boden is popular throughout this section, 
where he has a wide circle of warm personal 
friends. 

JOHN J. RICHARDS, now living retired 
in Indiana, was born Dec. 4, 1845, at Brady's 
Bend, Armstrong Co., Pa., son of John and 
Mary (Jenkins) Richards, natives of Wales, 
the father born in Cardiganshire. 

John Richards, the father, was a miner in 
his native land, working in lead and other 
ore mines. Having decided to try his for- 
tune in the United States, he came over with 
his sister, Jemima, leaving his family until 
he could prepare a home for them. He was 
three months and fourteen days on the ocean, 
had the misfortune to be shipwi-ecked, and 
was alone when he landed at New York, his 
sister having died at sea. Proceeding at once 
to Carbondale, Pa., he did not find work as 
he expected, so he walked thence to Pitts- 
burg, where he arrived with but twelve cents 
in his pocket. From there he went on to 
Brady's Bend, in Armstrong county, where 
he commenced to work in the mines, but the 
company which employed him went under 
soon afterward, and in company with another 
miner, Richard Ulley, he made a raft and 
went down the Allegheny river to Pittsburg. 
He dug coal at Sawmill run for a cent a 
bushel, but soon went west to St. Louis, Mo., 
in which section he dug coal for one winter. 
Coming back to Brady's Bend, he found the 
mines had started again and he was employed 
there for several .years. Meantime he had 
sent for his wife and family, then consisting 
of four children, and in 1843 they moved to 
Johnstown, Pa., where he worked in the coal 
mines. The family made their hom* at that 
place until 1858. Mrs. Richards died there 
in 1856, and Mr. Richards subsequently 
(1858) moved to Broad Top, Huntingdon 
Co., Pa., where he spent the remainder of his 
days, dying Jan. 12, 1873, at the age of 
sevent3^-two years. IMr. and Mi*s. Richards 
were members of the Baptist Church. They 
had the following children: Jemima, Mrs. 
Jeremiah Griffiths, who died jn Punxsutaw- 
ney. Pa. ; ^largaret, Mrs. David Shorthill, 
who died in Livingston, Mont. ; Thomas, of 
Punxsutawney ; Angeline, Mi's. "William 



Johns, who died in Punxsutawney ; John J. ; 
Abigail, Mrs. Joseph Higgins, who died in 
Clearfield, Pa., and ilary Jane, Mrs. William 
Hill, of Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 

John J. Richards passed the greater part 
of his early life at Johnstown and Broad Top, 
Pa., attending school in both places. At the 
outbreak of the Civil war he ran away twice 
and tried to enter the army, but his father 
brought him back. The third time he made 
the attempt he was successful, and he enlisted 
at Hollidaysburg, Blair Co., Pa., Feb. 24, 
1864, for three years or during the war, be- 
coming a private in Company K (Capt. John 
H. Boring), 22d Pennsylvania Cavalry (Col. 
George Higgins), with which he served twenty 
months, being discharged at Harrisburg, Pa., 
Oct. 26, 1865. He was under Sheridan in the 
Shenandoah valley, and took part in the bat- 
tles of Newmarket, Port Republic, Lynchburg, 
Fisher's Hill, Port Republic (again), Aspa 
Gap, Opequan Creek, Winchester and Cedar 
Creek. He was wounded while on scout duty. 

Coming home from the army, Mr. Richards 
went to work in the mines, being thus em- 
ployed in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Maryland. 
On May 21, 1871, he married Anna Matilda 
Drennen, of Huntingdon, Pa., daughter of 
Robert Drennen, who was born and reared in 
Huntingdon county; he worked on the con- 
struction of the Juniata canal. Locating at 
Powelton, Center Co., Pa., Mr. Richards lived 
there two j^ears, moving thence to Hunting- 
don county, and from there to Clearfield 
county and later to Jefl'erson county. On 
his retirement, in 1903, he moved from the 
latter county to the borough of Indiana, where 
he has since had his home. He bought his 
present residence, at No. 115 North Fifth 
street, and is very comfortably established 
there. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richards have had one son, 
John R. Mr. Richards is a member of the 
I. 0. 0. F., belonging to Lodge No. 261, of 
Coalmont, Huntingdon Co., Pa. He and his 
wife are members of the M. E. Church. 

JOHN R. RICHARDS, one of the most 
successful coal drillers in the fields of west- 
ern Pennsylvania and West Virginia, resides 
at Indiana, Indiana county, and is thor- 
oughly interested in the progress of that re- 
gion. He was born at Powelton, Center Co., 
Pa., Oct. 1, 1872, and is of Welsh descent, be- 
ing the only son of John J. Richards. 

John R. Richards attended public school in 
his native county, and later went to the 
Palms business college at Philadelphia. He 



920 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



then went to work for the Berwind Coal Min- 
ing Company, being employed in the mines 
until he was seventeen years old, when he 
started drilling. This has since been his prin- 
cipal occupation. Following it continuously 
until 1893, he worked in the mines again for 
a few years, until 1897, when he returned to 
the drilling business. In the spring of 1898 
he bought a one-fourth interest in a drilling 
business, his partners being William Pifer, 
H. Olson and T. G. Alabran, with whom he 
was associated until the spring of 1900, when 
he sold out to his partners and entered the 
business alone. He contracts to bore for coal, 
and has acquired an extensive patronage in 
the fields of this locality and West Virginia, 
being one of the best and most favorably 
known men in his line in those sections. As 
he has prospered, Mv. Richards has invested 
in other lines, being a stockholder in the Du- 
gan Glass Company of Indiana and in the In- 
diana Lumber Supply Company. ' He has 
shown decided ability in the management of 
his affairs, and has built up a flourishing busi- 
ness by close application to his work and a 
thorough study of the most approved meth- 
ods. 

In 1904 Mr. Richards married Belle Swarts, 
of Indiana county, and they have four chil- 
dren, namely: Esther, John D., Robert M. 
and Thomas J. Mr. Richards is well known 
in fraternal circles, holding membership in 
Lodge No. 313, F. & A. M., of Indiana, in the 
Modem Woodmen and in the B. P. 0. Elks, 
being a past exalted i-uler of the last named 
organization. 

JAMES C. BOVARD, senior member of the 
firm of Bovard & Ellis, of Marion Center, In- 
diana county, was born May 9, 1865, on the 
Bovard farm in East Mahoning township, this 
county, son of James Bovard. 

The Bovard family is of French extraction, 
the name being spelled Bouvard in France, 
where representatives bearing it are very 
prominent. This family was founded in West- 
moreland county. Pa., in an early day, and 
the original homestead of the immigrant Bo- 
vard is a half mile from what is now Delmont, 
being owned at present by the widow of Sam- 
uel Bovard, an aunt of James C. Bovard. 
This property was devoted to general farm- 
ing and on it a saw-mill was erected. 

John Bovard, the grandfather of James C. 
Bovard, died on this Westmoreland county 
homestead. 

James Bovard, a son of John Bovard and 
father of James C. Bovard, was born on the 



family estate in Westmoreland county in 1818. 
He married IMary Bovard, who was born near 
Saltsburg, in Westmoreland county, Pa., and 
the young couple moved to Indiana county, 
where for thirty-five years Mr. Bovard was 
engaged in a mercantile business in East Ma- 
honing township. In 1866 he settled at Mar- 
ion Center, where he continued in business 
as a merchant until 1879, when he retired. 
He died in Armstrong county September 26, 
1905, firm in the faith of the Presbyterian 
Church, of which he was a member. A Re- 
publican, he served as the first burgess of 
JMarion Center. His wife died Dec. 12, 1900, 
the mother of children as follows: William 
C, who was gi-aduated from Jefferson Medi- 
cal College, now practicing his profession at 
IMamont, Pa. (he married Marie Courtney 
Merchant) ; Alice, who married William Sim- 
ons, of Chicago; Melissa, who died in child- 
hood; and James C. 

James C. Bovard attended the school at 
Marion Center presided over by Mrs. L. N. 
Park, and later had Miss Ada Brady, William 
Coulter, William G. Stewart, John S. Helm, 
Butler Simpson and Samuel Wolf as instruc- 
tors. When he was sixteen years old he left 
school, and took the management of a plan- 
ing mill off the bauds of his father, who had 
more than he could attend to at that time. 
Later on he enlarged the scope of his opera- 
tions to include the handling of lumber, con- 
tinuing alone until 1898, when he formed a 
partnership with I. C. Ellis, under the name 
of Bovard & Ellis. The present plant was 
erected in 1907, and is a thoroughly modern 
affair. The firm cany on a general planing 
mill and lumber business and have a large 
trade. 

On Oct. 18, 1888, Mr. Bovard was married 
in Marion Center to Eva L. McCormiek, of 
that place, a daughter of Joseph C. and Re- 
becca (Shorthill) McCormiek. ]\Ir. Bovard 
is a member of the Presbyterian Church, 
which he supports liberally. He takes a pride 
in being a regular Republican, but aside from 
giving his influence as a private citizen, he is 
not active in politics. 

WILLIA]\I SEWARD CARNAHAN is one 
of the leading business men in Armstrong 
township, Indiana county, the finu of W. S. 
Carnahan & Brother, of which he is senior 
member, conducting two well-appointed gen- 
eral stores, one at Pai-kwood and one at She- 
locta. His home is at Shelocta. 

The Carnahan family is numbered among 
the early settlers of this section of Pennsyl- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



921 



vania, the Carualians having come to America 
at the same time as the well-known Tomb 
family of East Wheatfield township, this 
county. Thomas Carnahau, great-gi-and- 
father of William S. Carnahan, resided in 
Perrysville, Westmoreland county, five miles 
from Saltsburg. He married a Miss McKin- 
ley, and they had the following children: 
Israel, Thomas, Elizabeth (married Matthias 
Jockey), Wilson (who went to California in 
1849, returned to Pittsburg and engaged in 
the shoe business), Samuel and David R. 

David R. Carnahan, son of Thomas, was 
born at Perrysville, in Bell township, West- 
moreland county, and lived to the age of 
ninety-one years, dying in Armstrong town- 
ship, Indiana county. His schooling was lim- 
ited, and at an early age he became head of 
a family. Fanning was his principal voca- 
tion, and he was enterprising and progressive, 
being the first man in Westmoreland county 
to own a grain cradle. Later he went to Mc- 
Keesport, Pa., where he followed mining for 
a time, and then returning home bought a 
farm of 150 acres, which he subsequently laid 
out into building lots and sold, this being what 
is now Perrysville. In 1846 he became inter- 
ested in salt works on the Kiskiminetas river, 
near Saltsburg, and for a time was engaged 
in making salt, and at the same time he con- 
ducted a steam gristmill located on the Kis- 
kiminetas. He then moved to what is now 
Salina station and followed milling, then 
moved to the old farm at Perrysville, and in 
1848 came to Indiana county, where he pur- 
chased the James Clark farm of 150 acres in 
White to\vnship. A number of years after- 
ward he made a trade with John Cunning- 
ham, giving that place for a tract of 180 
acres in Armstrong towmship, upon which he 
passed the rest of his days, carrying on gen- 
eral farming. He was much respected in 
his neighborhood, served at one time as sup- 
ei-visor of roads, held other offices of trust, 
and was a valued member of the United Pres- 
byterian Church. His first wife, Martha 
(Morrison), died at the age of thirty-seven 
years, and he subsequently married (second) 
Lavina Berkeypile. There were five children 
by the first union: Thomas M. is mentioned 
below; Mary Agnes married Thomas Hearn; 
Israel married Nancy Anthony, and they are 
mentioned elsewhere ; Martha (deceased) mar- 
ried Sansom Person; John IMorrison (de- 
ceased) married Margaret Cunningham. 
Eight children were born to the second mar- 



riage : Albert, Carrie, Harvey, Lottie, Levi, 
Levina, David M. and Dick. 

Thomas M. Carnahan, father of William 
Seward Carnahan, was bom Aug. 27, 1837, 
at McKeesport, Pa., and obtained a common 
school education. He assisted his parents 
with the farm work, and in 1848 moved with 
his father to Indiana county, continuing to 
farm with him until 1888. He also owned a 
farm of his own, in Armstrong county, upon 
which he lived about fourteen years. In 1890 
he sold his farm and engaged in the general 
store business at Shelocta as senior member 
of the firm of Thomas M. Carnahan & Sons, 
retaining his interest in this business until 
his sons bought it On June 15, 1896, he 
entered upon his duties as postmaster at She- 
locta, and has served as such ever since; the 
office is located in his sons' store. Mr. Car- 
nahan has been associated with public af- 
fairs in his township practically throughout 
his mature life, has held the offices of super- 
visor and school director, and in political con- 
nection is a Republican. In his younger days 
he belonged to the Jr. 0. U. A. M., and in his 
early manhood he was a member of the State 
militia, at Chambersburg. He is an earnest 
member of the Shelocta United Presbyterian 
Church in Armstrong township, and is at pres- 
ent serving as elder in the cbvirch. 

On Dec. 25, 1855, Mr. Carnahan married 
Mary Ellen Hamilton, who was born in WTiite 
township, near Indiana, daughter of James 
and Margaret (Rhea) Hamilton, and died 
June 15, 1911, at the age of seventy-five years. 
She is buried in Oakland cemetery at Indi- 
ana. Children as follows were born to this 
union : James Otis, now a retired farmer liv- 
ing at Indiana, married Eva Portifield; Jane 
married James Hill, who is in the livery busi- 
ness at Indiana, where they reside ; David Ed- 
ward, a farmer, now, living in Ligonier, Pa., 
married Belle Ralston ; Ella M. married John 
S. Anderson, a farmer of Center township; 
William Seward is mentioned below; Mary 
Cynthia (deceased) was the wife of E. G. 
Orr; Thomas Wilson, who conducts the store 
of W. S. Carnahan & Bro. at Parkwood and 
also serves as postmaster at that place, mar- 
ried Mary Luella McGaughey, daughter of 
Joseph W. McGaughey, and after her death 
married Zella M. MeAdoo, by whom he has 
three children, Sarah M.. Thomas Archibald 
and Mary Ellen ; Maud died when three and 
a half years old. 

William Seward Carnahan was born March 
24, 1865, in Wlaite township, Indiana county, 
one and a half miles from the town of In- 



922 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



diana, and there gi-ew to manhood, receiving 
his education in the public schools. In his 
early manhood he was engaged in the sawmill 
business in association with his two brothers, 
and they also operated threshing machines 
and hay binders. On Jan. 1, 1892, he and his 
brother Thomas bought their father's inter- 
est in the general store at Shelocta, in the 
conduct of which they had previously been 
associated with him under the firm name of 
Thomas M. Carnahan & Sons, and a few years 
later, in 1895, thej' opened another store, in 
Parkwood, having conducted both places ever 
since. As before noted, his father is post- 
master at Shelocta, and his brother at Park- 
wood. Mr. Carnahan has demonstrated his 
business ability in everything with which he 
has been connected, and his fellow citizens 
have recognized his fitness by calling him to 
various public positions of trust. He is at 
present serving as assessor of his borough and 
president of the school board. Politically he 
is a Republican. His success in his own ven- 
tures, and his usefulness to the community, 
have brought him into prominence among the 
progressive residents of his locality. 

On March 8, 1893, Mr. Carnahan married 
Jessie Lowraan, daughter of Samuel Marlin 
Lowman, and they have three children: 
Charles Kelly, Julia Marie and William Ham- 
ilton. 

DELMONT E. NOTLEY, a retired lum- 
berman residing at Cherrytree, Indiana 
county, was born in Montgomery township, 
this county, March 21, 1859, son of John F. 
and Amanda E. (Jones) Notley. 

John Notley was born in Ireland, and came 
to America with his family in 1829, landing 
at Quebec, Canada, whence he drove across 
the country to Burnside, Clearfield Co., Pa. 
After a short stay there he came on to Mont- 
gomery- township, Indiana county, where he 
arrived in 1830, being one of the pioneers of 
that region. Later on he assisted in the build- 
ing of the Pennsylvania railroad, and was a 
man of some property. Here he died in 1863. 
Of his nine children, John F. was the young- 
est. 

John F. Notley was engaged in farming and 
lumbering in Montgomery township until 
1881, when he moved to Cherrytree, there liv- 
ing retired until his death, which occurred in 
1898, when he was seventy-one .years old. 

The Jones family, Mr. Notley's maternal an- 
cestors, originated in Wales, the founders of 
the branch in America coming from that coun- 
try at an early day. Dolmont Jones, grand- 



father of Delmont E. Notley, came to In- 
diana county early in life, living for a time 
at Cookport, but later went to Pittsburg. He 
became the owner of a farm, but lived in Pitts- 
burg until his death. Jlrs. Amanda E. 
(Jones) Notley, daughter of Delmont Jones 
and mother of Delmont E. Notley, was born 
in Pittsburg. She survives her husband and 
makes her home with her daughter, I\Irs. C. 
M. Shaffer, of Barnesboro. 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Notley were the par- 
ents of nine children: Elizabeth, who is the 
wife of Frank B. Camp, resides on the old 
homestead in Montgomeiy township ; Delmont 
E. is mentioned below; Mary is deceased; 
Robert F. is a merchant of Altoona, Pa. ; James 
M. lives at Ocean City, N. J. ; Simeon is de- 
ceased; John died in infancy; Rosie is de- 
ceased; Celia is the wife of C. M. Shaffer, a 
druggist of Barnesboro, Pennsylvania. 

Delmont E. Notley's boyhood was passed in 
a healthy, nonnal way in ^Montgomery town- 
ship, where he alternated attendance at school 
with assisting his father. When he attained 
his majority he embarked in a lumber business 
at Cherrytree, and found this line of endeavor 
so profitable that he continued in it until his 
retirement. For thirty-three years he has 
been a resident of Chenytree, and his inter- 
ests are centered there. He is a member of 
the Presbj1:erian Church of Cherr}i;ree, while 
Ifraternall.y he belongs to Summit Lodge, No. 
312, F. & A. M., of Ebensburg. 

On Aug. 14, 1880, Mr. Notley was married 
to Jennie M. ]\IcKeag, born in Indiana county, 
a daughter of Robert and Jennie (Atchison) 
McKeag, the former born in Clinton county. 
Pa., and the latter in Clearfield county. Pa. 
They were pioneers of Indiana county, set- 
tling at Cherrytree, where the father rounded 
out his life as a lumbennan, dying in 1882. 
his wife surviving him until 1883. Mrs. Not- 
ley passed away Nov. 7, 1912, the mother of 
four children: Emma, who died April 1, 
1883 ; Octa, who is the wife of V. 0. Tonkin, 
of Cherrytree, and has one child, Robert; W. 
Delmont, who is living at home; and Esther, 
also living at home. 

A]M0S E. GILLESPIE, general superin- 
tendent of the plant of the Josephine Furnace 
& Coke Company, at Josephine, Indiana 
county, has been stationed there in that ca- 
pacity since 1906, and much of its develop- 
ment has been carried on under his super- 
vision. He has been in his present line of 
work ever since he entered business life. 

]\Ir. Gillespie was born Dec. 8. 1874, in Ris- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



923 



ing Sun, Cecil Co., Md., son of William E. and 
Mary R. (Ewing) Gillespie. His early edu- 
cation was obtained in the schools of his na- 
tive county, and he subsequently took a course 
at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
Boston, graduating in 1896. Immediately af- 
terward he took a position as chemist with 
the Carnegie Steel Company at Duquesne, Pa., 
where he continued until 1899, in that year 
receiving appointment as assistant superin- 
tendent of the blast furnaces at Youngstown, 
Ohio, for the Carnegie Steel Company. He 
was there for two years, in 1901 returning to 
Duquesne to become assistant superintendent 
of the Carnegie Steel Company's blast fur- 
nace at that point. After one year in that 
position he came to Scottdale, Westmoreland 

.Co., Pa., to take the superintendency of the 
Scottdale Furnace Company, which he held 
for four years, from 1902 to 1906, since when 
he has been at Josephine as general superin- 
tendent of- the Josephine Furnace & Coke 
Company. Like the Scottdale plant, this is a 
subsidiai*y Company of Corrigan, McKinney 
& Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

• At that time the Josephine establishment 
was in its infancy, and the large plant was 
constructed under his supervision; a second 
furnace is now in operation. A settlement 
of considerable size has grown up around these 
works, 190 dwelling houses having been built, 
streets laid out, and various improvements 
made necessary for the comfort and well-be- 
ing of the community, all of which has been 
accomplished economically and eiSciently un- 
der his able management. The company has 
a chartered railroad, a chartered electric light 
plant and two water systems, one to supply 
the town and one to supply the works, over 
two million dollars having been expended in 
land and construction work (this including 
the dwellings and.other buildings) during his 
incumbency. Josephine is one of the most 
prosperous and best ordered mining towns in 
Indiana county. Over three hundred hands 
find employment at the works, and the town 
has a total population of a thousand or more, 
of various nationalities. The employees are 
comfortably housed, and the company has 
done many things to contribute to their com- 
fort and convenience — more than the average, 
as the spirit of contentment which prevails in 
the town testifies. A general store and bank 
was conducted by the company until the build- 
ing (which cost .$45,000) was destroyed by fire 
in 1910. Six hundred tons of pig iron are 
turned out from the furnace daily. Mr. Gil- 
lespie takes a personal interest in the welfare 



of the men under his charge and their famil- 
ies, and he has used his influence whenever 
possible to obtain benefits for them, the pub- 
lic schools and the general prosperity in all 
lines receiving his best thought and attention. 
He has served as member of the board of 
school directors of Burrell township, in which 
the town lies, and is at present road super- 
visor, being particularly interested in the good 
roads movement. 

On June 27, 1899, Mr. Gillespie was mar- 
ried, at Duquesne, Pa., to Florence L. Mc- 
Clure, daughter of Matthew L. and Hannah 
S. (Read) AlcClure, and they have a family 
of five children: Helen McClure, J. Read, 
William E., Florence L. and George F. The 
family live at Blacklick, where Mr. Gillespie 
has a fine brick residence, one of the hand- 
somest in that part of Indiana county. Mr. 
and Jlrs. Gillespie are membere of the Presby- 
terian Church, and are active in its work, Mj-. 
Gillespie serving as superintendent of the 
Sunday school. In politics he is a Republican. 
Fraternally he is a member of Lodge No. 582, 
F. & A. M., at Homestead, Pa., and of the 
B. P. 0. Elks lodge at Scottdale, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

HARRY W. FEE, attorney at law at In- 
diana, Indiana Co., Pa., and present post- 
master of that borough, was born March 9, 
1870, near Reed Station, this county, a few 
miles south of the town of Indiana. 

(I) Andrew Fee, the great-grandfather of 
Harry W. Fee, was an early settler of what 
is now Armagh borough, and his first child, 
Jeannette, was the first child to be born in 
that borough — her birth occurring about 1800. 
She' died at Blairsville, Pa., when about sev- 
enty-two years of age. Later in life Andrew 
Fee removed to Wlieatfield township, settling 
at what is now Heshbon, Indiana county, and 
there his death occurred. 

(II) Thomas Fee, son of Andrew Fee, and 
grandfather of Harry W. Fee, married Jane 
Mahan. 

(III) John Fee, son of Thomas Fee, and 
father of Harry W. Fee, was for a number 
of years engaged in farming at Heshbon, in 
Brushvalley township, whence he removed to 
a farm near Mechaniesburg, and thence to the 
borough of that name, where he became the 
proprietor of a chopping and planing mill. 
There his death occurred in August, 1910, 
when he was aged seventy-three years. He 
died in the faith of the United Presbyterian 
Church, in which he had held various offices; 
his political connections were with the Demo- 



924 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



cratie party. Mr. Fee married Ellen Duncan, 
who still survives him, and resides at No. 533 
Railroad avenue, Indiana. They became the 
parents of seven children, as follows : Laura, 
who is now Mrs. Aaron Gamble, of Johns- 
town; William J., a former member of Com- 
pany E, 20th United States Infantry, who 
died at Fort Assinniboine, Mont. ; Alice, who 
died when a j'oung woman, in 1885; Hany 
W. and Jennie, twins, the latter of whom is 
married to Henry Koei-bel, and resides at 
Millvale, Pa.; Lawrence M., who married 
Sarah Stogden, and lives in Pittsburg; and 
Elizabeth, who lives with her mother. 

David Duncan, the maternal grandfather 
of Harry W. Fee, was bom in what is now 
Green township, Indiana county, near the 
present town of Beringer (Union town post 
office), and married Llargaret Pierce, who 
was born near the present town of Plumville, 
Pennsylvania. 

(IV) Harry W. Fee, son of John Fee, was 
reared on the old home farm in Brushvalley 
township and iti the Mechanicsburg home, and 
received his primary education in the common 
schools of the former and summer school at 
the latter borough, and at Armagh, Pa. In 
1888 he began teaching school in Brushvalley 
township, where he continued two terms, then 
spent two terms at Homer City, a term at 
Mechanicsburg, one in the borough of Ar- 
magh and one at Rosedale, Cambria Co., Pa. 
In 1893 he began studying law, in the offices 
of David H. Tomb, of Indiana borough, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1898. He con- 
tinued in a general practice in Indiana until 
called for sei-vice during the Spanish- Ameri- 
can war. He had enlisted Feb. 25, 1893, be- 
coming a private in Company D, 5th P. N. G.. 
and on June 8, 1897, was transferred to Com- 
pany F. He was promoted to corporal ]\Iarch 
5, 1897, to sergeant April 27, 1898, and re- 
ceived his honorable discharge May 11, 1898. 
On that day he reenlisted, becoming sergeant 
of Company F, 5th Pennsjdvania Volunteer 
Infantrj-, and was mustered out with his com- 
pany Nov. 7, 1898. He again entered the ser- 
vice as a private of Company F, Jru. 2, 1899. 
was elected second lieutenant March 29, 1899, 
first lieutenant March IS, 1902. captain Oct. 
26, 1903. and major of the 5th Regiment June 
29, 1907. nnd was transferred Jan. 1. 1910, io 
major of the 10th. His commission expired 
June 29, 1912, and since that time he has been 
on the retired list. 

On his return to private life, Major Fee 
again turned his entire attention to the prac- 
tice of his profession. He became secretary 



of the Democratic county central committee 
in 1896, was its chairman in 1897 and 1898, 
and in July, 1912, was again elected to that 
position. He has held the county office of 
auditor, in 1900-1-2, and also has served three 
years as county solicitor, 1902-3-4:. On Aug. 
12, 1913, he was appointed postmaster at In- 
diana, and is now serving in that position. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Elks, 
the Odd Fellows and the Woodmen of the 
World, and in the latter is a charter mem- 
ber of Indiana Camp, No. 40, of which he 
has been clerk since its organization in 1897. 
His religious affiliation is with the United 
Presbyterian Church. Major Fee is widely 
known in public, professional and military 
circles, and the universal popularity which 
lie enjoys is eloquent evidence of the high 
esteem in which he is held. 

On Jan. 2, 1901, Major Fee was married to 
Cora Myers, daughter of William H. and Mar- 
garet (Allison) Myers, and to this union has 
come one child, Eunice, born May 9, 1903. 

JOHN SCOTT OLIVER, farmer of Cone- 
maugh township and justice of the peace, was 
born there July 4, 1849, sou of James and 
jMary K. (Hart) Oliver. 

James Olivei-, the paternal great-gi-and- 
father, came to America in 1784, landing at 
Philadelphia. He was from County Derry, 
Ireland, although of English-Irish extraction. 
Mr. Oliver brought both friends and relatives 
with him in addition to his immediate family, 
his influence among his associates being such 
as to make them follow his example even to 
the extent of leaving their homes for a new 
rountry. The party settled near the present 
Gettysburg, and there Mr. Oliver took up a 
large tract of land, cultivating it for a few 
years. After his death, his widow moved over 
the intervening mountains and settled in In- 
diana county. James Oliver married a Miss 
Smith, and their children were: Alexander, 
who settled* in Armstrong county, where his 
descendants now live ; William, who lived and 
died near Indiana town : John, who went on 
a trip West and then down the Ohio river, 
and was never heard from again ; and James. 

James Oliver, son of James, the American 
founder of the family, and grandfather of 
John Scott Oliver, was bom in Ireland in 
1778, and was but a few years old when 
brought to this country by his parents. His 
first location after he began to earn his own 
li\ing was near Lebanon, biit later he moved 
to Livermore, settling on the large tract of 
land where he spent the remainder of his 
life, engaged in farming and lumbering. On 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



925 



this property he built a large house and barn, 
both of logs, as was the custom in those days. 
The Covenanter Church had in him a consist- 
ent member, and he took an active part in all 
its. good works. In politics he was a Whig. 
On July 10, 1810, James Oliver was married 
to Mrs. Margaret (Colemaii) Mathews, born 
Oct. 5, 1779. He passed away in 1865, and 
he and his wife are buried in the little ceme- 
teiy in Conemaugh township. The following 
children were born to them: James is men- 
tioned below ; John, who was a carpenter and 
farmer, and served as justice of the peace at 
Lebanon for thirty years, married Nancy Pat- 
tison; William, bom April 23, 1817, died 
Feb. 18, 1856, who followed farming at Eld- 
ersridge, married Liza Anderson, and had one 
child, Margaret Elizabeth ; Robert, born Nov. 
6, 1819, died Jan. 12, 1862, married Elizabeth 
Pattison and (second) Jane S. Marshall, and 
had children, Coleman, William, Martha 
(married to John C. Frederick) and Ida L. ; 
Nancy, born Jan. 11, 1814, died June 10, 1814 ; 
Nicholas, born April 23, 1817, died Julv 28, 
1817. 

James Oliver, Jr., son of James Oliver and 
father of John Scott Oliver, was bom April 
29, 1811, and died July 6, 1875. His birth- 
place was Conemaugh township. Indiana 
county, where he was reared to manhood amid 
rural surroundings, learning to farm while 
attending tl'e local schools. When he grew to 
maturity he began farming on his own ac- 
count, becoming interested in stock raising as 
well. Buying the James Nesbett farm of 131 
acres now owned by his heirs, he had it pat- 
ented in 1849. Active in church work, he first 
connected himself with the Seceder Church, 
later joining the Covenanters, became an 
elder of that body, and held that office until 
his death. Devoted to home and family, he 
was domestic in his tastes and took his pleas- 
ures surrounded by his own circle. James 
Oliver married Mary K. Hart, who was born 
in 1814, daughter of John and Abigail (Scott) 
Hart, of White township, and died June 11, 
1885. Children as follows were born to them : 
James Mathews, born Oct. 17, 1839, is on the 
old homestead near Livermore (during the 
Civil war, he served in Company G, 206th 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, from 1863 
to 1864, under Captain ^MeCombs and Col. 
William A. Brady, being under fire at James 
River and while on the reserve force) ; a son, 
bom Feb. 1. 1841, died Feb. 15, 1841 ; Abigail, 
born July 2, 1842, died Aug. 1. 1844; Mar- 
garet Amanda, born Dec. 27, 1844, died Dec. 
8, 1900, unmarried, having made her home 



with her brother all her life; Nancy Jane, 
liorn Feb. 20, 1847, is now her brother's house- 
keeper; John Scott was next; Martha Ann, 
Ijorn Oct. 20, 1851, has long been a school 
teacher in Allegheny city. Pa., and for the 
last twenty-one years has been teaching in 
the Eleventh Avard public school; Sarah Eliza, 
liorn May 4, 1854, died March 6, 1894, un- 
married. 

Squire John Scott Oliver, son of James 
Oliver, Jr., was born in Conemaugh town- 
ship, .Indiana Co., Pa., July 4, 1849, as be- 
fore stated. He attended public school in dis- 
tricts Nos. 11 and 5, and was then sent to a 
select school at Livermore. Folloiving this 
he taught school one term in Conemaugh 
township, and one term in DeiTy township, 
Westmoreland county. Having earned the 
necessai-y funds, he then entered Geneva Col- 
lege, at Geneva, Ohio, where he remained from 
1873 to 1878, taking a course in civil engi- ^ 
neering. After he had thus fitted himself 
for the work, he went to the oil fields at Eden- 
burg, Clarion coimty, where he spent six 
months suiweying and doing engineering work 
in connection with the production of oil. 
Then, from 1879 to. 1885, Mr. Oliver was con- 
nected with the Bingham Estate, in McKean 
county, Pa., and from 1885 to 1887 was with 
the J. J. Vandergriff Engineering and Con- 
struction Company, laying pipe lines from 
Hickory, Washington Co., Pa., to Wheeling, 
W. Va. In 1886 Mr. Oliver was employed 
by the Apollo Iron and Steel Compan.y as sud- 
erintendent of the gas company at Apollo, 
holding that position until 1891. In the lat- 
ter year he went with the Philadelphia Com- 
pany and Joseph Creig, producers of oil and 
gas, and was engaged in their land depart- 
ments. 

In 1896 Mr. Oliver returned to his father's 
homestead in Conemaugh tovsoiship, and began 
farming and dairying in partnership with his 
brother, selling milk to Pittsburg dealers. He 
continued thus until 1911, when he sold his 
dairy, now devoting himself to his farming 
interests. The fanii is well equipped for the 
work carried on there, having running water 
and all modern conveniences ; Mr. Oliver 
piped the water from a large spring on the 
hill to his house and barn. A man of experi- 
ence of the outside world, he appreciates the 
value of scientific methods, and applies them 
in his everyday work with gratifying results. 
He and his brother conduct the homestead of 
131 acres, in addition to 100 acres which they 
added to the original holdings. Mr. Oliver 
now controls nearly 250 acres of land, 230 



HISTORY OF INDIAXA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



acres of which are under cultivation. This 
property is all underlaid with two rich veins 
of coal, one being 180 feet down and the other 
210 feet below the surface. There is an open- 
ing near the Conemaugh river. 

On May 1, 1901, Mr. Oliver was elected jus- 
tice of the peace, and still holds that office. 
In addition to his other interests, he is a stock- 
holder in the Conemaugh Township Eural 
Telephone Company. Although he has been 
giving the better part of his time to agricul- 
tural pursuits, he still follows his profession 
when his services are called for, and has exe- 
cuted some important surveying and engineer- 
ing contracts in Conemaugh and surrounding 
townships. For many years he has been a 
member of the United Presbyterian Church, 
and for seven years has acted as a trustee ; his 
adult Bible class is largely attended. Mr. 
Oliver is unmarried. 

SAM-UEL PALMER, late of Pittsburg, Pa., 
where he was successfully engaged in the 
practice of law for many years, was a native 
of Philadelphia, and a son of Anthony Allaire 
Palmer. 

Anthony Allaire Palmer was born in Phila- 
delphia, where he lived and died, his family 
subsequentlj' moving to western Pennsylvania. 
He was a local preacher. He married Mary 
Bryan, who was a daughter of James Bryan, 
and they had a family of six children, namely : 
Thomas, who married Irene Hooper, of Balti- 
more, Md., and died in Pittsburg (he was a 
wall paper merchant) ; Maiy A., who married 
Thomas M. Howe, of Pittsburg; Samuel, who 
died young; Samuel (2) ; Rebecca, who died 
unmarried ; and Hattie A., who died unmar- 
ried. 

William Bryan, the first maternal ancestor 
of his name to come to America, was a native 
of France, of noble birth. He was a Hugue- 
not, and left his native land on account of re- 
ligious persecution, going with his })rothers to 
London, England, where they all i-esided for 
a time. One brother remained there, William 
and the other brother turning to America. 
After stopping for a time in New Jei-sey he 
came to Pennsylvania and purcliasfd a con- 
siderable tract of land in Bucks county, where 
he spent the remainder of his life. While in 
England he had married a Welsh lady, and 
they had several children, one of whom, a 
beautiful daughter, was thought worthy of 
eulogy in Thomas ^loore's poem, "Farewell 
to the Banks of the Schuylkill." 

James Bryan, son of William, was reared 
in Bucks county. Pa., and owned and op- 



erated a large dairy. Later, about 1810-11, he 
moved with his family to Cecil coimty, Md., 
where he purchased Bohemia Manor, where 
his remaining days were passed. He married 
Elizabeth Yeaman or Yeoman, by whom he 
had thirteen childi-en, ten of whom grew to 
maturity. Of these, Mary was the wife of 
Anthony A. Palmer. 

Samuel Palmer was a small boy when the 
family moved to Pittsburg, where he grew 
up, receiving his early education in the local 
schools. He later took a course at Washington 
and Jefferson College, at Washington, Pa., 
from which institution he was gi-aduated, and 
after completing his law course he settled 
down to practice in Pittsburg, where he fol- 
lowed his profession until his death, July 7, 
1889, at the age of sixty-two years. 

In 1855 jMr. Palmer was maiTied, in St. 
Louis, to Rebecca L. Bryan, daughter of Sam- 
uel Bryan, of Bohemia Manor, Cecil Co., Md., 
and she died in Pittsburg, Feb. 12, 1857. leav- 
ing one child, Maiy R., an infant three weeks 
old, born Jan. 18th. Mr. Palmer subsequently 
married (second) ^lary Stokes, of Philadel- 
phia, who survived him several years. He was 
a prominent member of the Third Presbyte- 
rian Church of Pittsburg, which he served for 
j-ears in the office of elder. In politics he was 
a Republican. His daughter, Miss Mary R. 
Palmer, has made her home at Indiana, Pa., 
for the last seventeen years. 

ELMER F. FRASHER. M. D., physician 
and surgeon at Smicksburg, was born in Port 
Washington, Tuscarawas Co., Ohio, Nov. 12, 
1861, son of Jacob ^1. and Grace E. (Johns- 
ton) Frasher. 

Fieldren Frasher, the paternal grandfather 
of Dr. Elmer F. Frasher, was a native of Fay- 
ette county. Pa., and married Catherine Tant- 
linger, of Somerset county. They lived in 
Burnsville, where they kept a hotel, but later 
moved to Guernsey county. Ohio, ilr. Frasher 
taking up a farm on which they spent the re- 
mainder of their lives. They had two chil- 
dren : Luke, living on the old Ohio home- 
stead; and Jacob M. 

Jacob M. Frasher, son 6f Fieldren Frasher, 
and father of Dr. Elmer F. Frasher, was boi-n 
in Fayette county. Pa., in 1833, and died in 
1903. He was a teacher during the greater 
part of his life, being for thirty years pro- 
prietor of a Business College and Normal In- 
stitute at Wheeling. W. Ya. He also taught 
school at Troy. N. Y.. Springfield, JIass.. and 
Port Washington. Ohio. He was a pupil in 
penmanship under P. R. Spencer, of Spencer- 



HISTOKY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



927 



ian fame, the "Father of Penmanship." For 
thirty years JMr. Frasher was a resident of 
"Wheeling, W. Va., but his last years were 
spent in Washington county, Pa. As a young 
man, he joined the Masons, and was connected 
with the fraternity to the end of his life, and 
his religious association was with the Presby- 
terian' Church. On May 19, 1860, he was mar- 
ried to Grace E. Johnston, of Conneaut Lake, 
Crawford Co., Pa., and they had three chil- 
dren: Ada, the wife of George Dunbar, an 
electrician of Pittsburg, who has one son, 
Harold; Elmer F. ; and Zanna J., the wife of 
Dr. D. Sherman Smith, a dentist of Lancaster, 
Pa., who has one child, Grace E. Both Mrs. 
Dunbar and Mrs. Smith are graduates of the 
Wheeling Female Seminary. 

Matthew K. Johnston, the maternal grand- 
father of Dr. Elmer F. Frasher, was bom 
in Mercer county. Pa., and married Jane 
Johnston. He was educated at Meadville, Pa., 
and studied under Dr. Cossett, subsequently 
engaging in the practice of medicine in Mer- 
cer, Pa., and later at Newton Falls, Ohio. On 
account of his health he engaged in the jew- 
elry business at Port Washington, Ohio, and 
there his death occui-red, while his wife passed 
away at Meadville, Pa., of typhoid fever, in 
1848. They had two children: John, who 
died when young; and Grace E., who married 
Mr. Frasher. 

Elmer F. Frasher received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of Wheeling, W. 
Va., following which he became a student at 
Washington and Jefferson College, at Wash- 
ington, Pa., from Avhich institution he was 
graduated in 1883. He then entered the med- 
ical department of the University of Mary- 
land, at Baltimore, where he received his de- 
gree of doctor of medicine in. 1887. During 
the next year he served as interne in the L^ni- 
versity Hospital, Baltimore, Md., and then 
entered the Western Pennsylvania Hospital, 
Pittsburg, of which he was resident physician 
for one year. He was also assistant physi- 
cian in the Eye and Ear Hospital, Baltimore. 
He took the eye and ear prize of his class while 
in college, as well as the gold medal prize for 
the highest number of points in practice in 
medicine, taking two of the five prizes offered 
in a class of ninety pupils. 

In 1888 Dr. Frasher embarked upon the 
practice of his profession in Pittsburg, where 
he remained during the next five years, then 
going to Wheeling, W. Va., where he acted" 
in the capacity of medical examiner for var- 
ious insurance companies for five years. He 
was next located in the suburbs of Pittsburg 



for three years, and built up a lucrative prac- 
tice, but in 1905 came to his present location, 
at Smicksburg. Dr. Frasher carries on a 
general practice. His wide and varied ex- 
perience in his profession, his inherent sym- 
pathy, his acknowledged ability and kindness 
of heart, all have combined to assist him in 
the alleviation of the ills of mankind, and to 
build up a large patronage. He has kept 
abreast of the various discoveries and ad- 
vances of his pi'ofession, subscribing to the 
leading medical journals and attending lec- 
tures, and takes a great interest in the work 
of the various organizations, in which he holds 
membership. Dr. Frasher is a consistent 
member of the Lutheran Church. He has 
not taken an active part in political matters, 
but has always maintained an intelligent in- 
terest in those movements which have affected 
the welfare of his community. A leader alike 
in professional and social life, he has numer- 
ous friends throughout this section, and no 
man stands in higher general esteem among 
the people of Smicksburg. 

WALTER H. JACKSON, managing edi- 
tor of the Indiana Evening Gazette, was born 
on a farm near Sewickley, Pa., Dec. 16, 1867, 
his father being Andrew Jackson, for years 
a successful farmer near Shelocta, this county, 
and his mother being Rebecca (]\IcClarren) 
Jackson, whose girlhood was spent in Indi- 
ana. When but seven years of age the sub- 
ject of this sketch lost both his parents by 
death. After that and until his marriage, in 
1895, he made his home with an uncle and 
aunt, the late Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Hilde- 
brand, in Indiana. His education was ob- 
tained in the Indiana public schools, the local 
model school and the Indiana State normal 
school, from which he graduated with the 
class of 1886. During the following winter 
he taught school in Shelocta, this county, and 
then worked for several years in stores in In- 
diana. 

In 1891 Mr. Jackson became connected with 
the Indiana Gazette, then a weekly paper, as a 
reporter. After a year 's service here, he was 
called to Altoona, Pa., to accept an editorial 
position with the Altoona Evening Gazette; 
but in six months he was recalled to Indiana 
to assume the management and editorial chair 
of the Indiana Gazette, with which paper he 
has ever since been connected. In editorial 
policy, Mr. Jackson has always stood for the 
industrial advancement of Indiana county. 
He proclaimed the mineral wealth of this rich 
section at a time when his statements were 



928 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



ridiculed as overdrawn, but he kept plug^ng 
away, calling attention to every new devel- 
opment and endeavoring to direct the atten- 
tion of capital to Indiana count}'. Naturally 
considerable satisfaction has come to him as 
a result of the wonderful developments of the 
last few years. 

In 1895 air. Jackson married Florence B. 
Young, daughter of Prof, and Mrs. J. H. 
Young, of Indiana, and shortly thereafter 
erected the handsome residence on South Sixth 
street in which they now reside. 

JMr. Jackson served as chief bui-gess of In- 
diana for three j-ears and was a member of 
the town council for a short period, filling 
out the unexpired tei'm of a member who 
had died. In past years he has been officially 
identified with a number of his town 's organi- 
zations, being one of the incorporators of the 
Indiana Street Railway Company, now the In- 
diana County Street Railways Company. He 
was an earnest advocate of the Young ]\Ien's 
Christian Association and had considerable 
part in the raising of the $50,000 fund for the 
building and equipping of the present mag- 
nificent Y. ]\I. C. A. building. He is one of 
the boai'd of directors of the Association. 

In religion Mr. Jackson is a Presbyterian, 
being a member of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Indiana and superintendent of the 
primary department of its Sunday school. 

HON. WILLIAM JAMES McKNIGHT, 
M. D. The subject of this sketch was born 
and raised in the town of Brookville, Jeffer- 
son Co., Pa., the date of his birth being May 
6, 1836. Thrown upon his own resources 
when a boy, at an age when little was ex- 
pected of a youth, by his own indomitable 
will, push and determination (which were 
marked characteristics in his early boyhood) 
he rose from the humble and obscure farm 
laborer and "printers' devil" to a position 
and prominence which few men attain, carv- 
ing out for himself a name and fame in the 
annals of his profession, town, county and 
State, to which his descendants and his 
friends can always point with pride. 

Dr. McKnight is recognized as one of the 
prominent, influential and well-to-do citi- 
zens of his section, one who has alway.s taken 
an active and beneficial interest in the ad- 
vancement of town, county and State, a man 
who has always held his word as sacred as his 
bond ; one who has taken a great interest in 
the uplifting of mankind, and who has never 
willfully misu.sed or wronged his fellowman. 
This sketch is taken largely from an article 



wliich appeared in the Brookville Republican 
of JMarch 24, 1897. Dr. McKnight 's parents 
were Alexander and ]\Iary (Thompson) ]\Ic- 
Knight, the father dying when W. J. was but 
thirteen mouths old. The Doctor received a 
limited education in the common schools. 
"When he was about eleven years of age 
he was thrown upon his own resources, 
and began the struggle of life. For five 
years he lived and worked upon a farm. 
At the age of sixteen he began teaching school 
and working in the office of the Jefferson 
Star, learning the printer's trade. Two years 
later he began reading medicine under Dr. 
A. M. Clarke, of Brockway^'ille, and held a 
position as compositor on the Elk County Ad- 
vocate. During the next three years, by prac- 
ticing such economy as is rarely thought of by 
the young man of the present day, he had 
saved enough money to enable him to take a 
single course of medical lectures at Cinchinati, 
Ohio, during the winter of 1856-57, and in 
March following (1857) he began the prac- 
tice of medicine in his native town. In 1859 
he formed a partnership with Dr. Niver, of 
Brockwaj-Aille, which was tei-minated four 
years later after they had established a large 
and extensive practice. In 186.3 Dr. Mc- 
Knight returned to Brookville, where he op- 
ened a drug store on Oct. 8th, carrying on 
the same in connection with his practice, and 
which, together with his son, J. B., he still 
operates under the firm name of McKnight 
& Son. It is the oldest store in point of con- 
tinuous management in Jefi'erson county. On 
Aug. 4, 1862, Governor Curtin appointed the 
Doctor examining surgeon for Jefferson and 
Forest counties. He was also appointed, and 
served for seven years, as United States pen- 
sion surgeon, but other duties made it neces- 
sary for him to resign this position. He served 
as private and orderly sergeant in Company 
G, 57th United States Emergency Regiment: 
was promoted to quartermaster sergeant, and 
took part in the campaign against Morgan. 
In 1869 he attended lectures in Philadelphia 
and received the degree of M. D. He after- 
ward attended two full coui-ses in succession 
at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, 
Pa., from which institution he was gi-aduated 
in March, 1884, and the same year received a 
degree from the school of anatomy and sur- 
gery. In 1S85 he took a post-graduate course 
at Jefferson College. 

Dr. McKnight's political activities began 
when a boy. In 1876 Jefferson county Re- 
publicans presented him for State senator, 
and Indiana county Republicans presented 




ir3(^ 



iu-H^/^4XC /^/.3 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



929 



Dr. St. Clair, Indiana and Jefferson counties 
forming the 37tli Senatorial district. Three 
conventions were held "sVithout a nomination, 
when for the good of the party, to save the 
Congi-ess nominee of Indiana, and to secure 
harmony among the voters, Dr. McKnight in 
a most magnanimous and manly letter with- 
drew from the contest. In 1880 Jefferson 
county Republicans again presented Dr. Mc- 
Knight as her choice, and_ Indiana county Re- 
publicans presented George W. Hood. After 
a three days' convention of delegates from 
the two counties, no nomination being agreed 
upon, a second conference was held with no 
result. Another meeting was held, at which 
G-en. James S. Negley, of Pittsburg, acted as 
umpire, when Dr. McKnight was nominated; 
he was elected at the polls and served in the 
Senate from 1881 to 1885. The Doctor took 
a very active part in all public measures 
♦brought before the Senate during his term of 
ofSce. He was the author of several very im- 
portant bills, and through his conservative 
and practical business methods were enacted 
a number of needed reforms whereby the Com- 
monwealth was saved several hundred thou- 
sand dollars per annum. Honesty and econ- 
omy with the people's money was his slogan. 
His reform in printing public documents 
saves the State forty thousand dollars a year. 
He advocated and secured the first additional 
appropriation under the new constitution to 
the schools of one hundred and twenty-five 
thousand dollars; advocated the furnishing 
of schoolbooks free by the State to all the 
schools; and free schools in fact — school tax 
abolished, schools to be maintained and sup- 
ported by the State. The attention he called 
to careless auditing brought into the State 
one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. He 
carried through a reform in the commence- 
ment of borough and township offices. He 
took an active interest in the wards of the 
State and gave a hearty support to the sol- 
diers' orphans' schools, advocating justice 
to the soldier, his widow and his orphan. He 
introduced a bill providing for the classifi- 
cation of the insane, and advocated that the 
expense of their support be paid by the State. 
He originated and introduced a number of 
valuable reforms that fell for want of time. 
He pushed through the Senate in 1881 the 
bill authorizing counties to refund their bonds 
at a lower rate of interest. He originated, 
agitated and pushed through the Senate bill 
No. 117, entitled An Act For Promotion of 
Medical Science, by the distribution and use 



of unclaimed human bodies for scientific pur- 
poses, through a board created for that pur- 
pose, and to prevent unauthorized uses and 
traffic in human bodies, which was approved 
and signed June 18, 1883. This law has now 
been enacted in nearly every State in the 
Union. He supported and voted for the fol- 
lowing laws: The law of 1881, Act No. 21, 
which provides proper means of conveyance 
of persons injured in and about the mines, to 
their homes; Act No. 54, 1881, "To provide 
the means for securing the health and safety 
of persons employed in the bituminous coal 
mines of Pennsylvania"; Act No. 173, 1881, 
' ' To secure to operators and laborers engaged 
in and about coal mines, manufactories of 
iron and steel, and all other manufactories, 
the payment of their wages at regular inter- 
vals and in lawful money of the United 
States" (this law regulates and prevents the 
excessive profit on merchandise) ; law of 1883, 
Act No. 16, "To provide for voluntary tribu- 
nals, to adjust disputes between employers 
and employed"; Act No. 46, 1883, "To pro- 
tect the miners in the bituminous coal regions 
in this Commonwealth" (this law secures the 
miner pay for all clean coal mined by him 
without regard to size; makes seventy -six 
pounds of coal a bushel and two thousand 
pounds a ton ; requires all cars to be branded 
and uniform in size ; creates the office of check 
weighman and defines his duties) ; Act No. 
48, 1883, which now compels props and timber 
to be furnished ; Act No. 97, 1883, creating a 
mining boss and defining his duties, providing 
for cut-throughs and holes for shelter, bore 
holes, printed rules, safety lamps, board of 
examiners, etc., also for six bituminous mine 
inspectors instead of three, and also for two 
mining engineers ; Act No. 104, 1883, "For the 
better protection of the wages of mechanics, 
miners, laborers and others" (this law gives 
the laborer preference against insolvent com- 
panies or debtors). 

In a speech advocating reform in the Sen- 
ate, March 14, 1883, Dr. McKnight used 
these words, ' ' and now, Mr. President, to fur- 
ther assist in the public good, to promote hon- 
est government and purify the public service, 
I would make all offices in both State and 
nation, except the merest clerkships, elective 
by the people. I would elect postmasters, col- 
lectot-s, marshals, and especially United 
States senators." His zeal and entei-prise 
gained for him State celebrity, as well as re- 
flecting much credit upon his ability and 
statesmanship. In 1884 Dr. McKnight and 



930 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



G. W. Hood were again pitted against each 
other for the nomination. The established 
usage of the party entitled Dr. McKnight to 
a second term, especially as Indiana county 
had had the senator for sixteen out of twenty 
years, and all acknowledged that he had 
served with honor and credit to his district, 
his constituents and himself. He was regu- 
larly and fairly renominated at a party con- 
ference in Indiana, but was defeated at the 
polls by Hood, who ran as an independent 
candidate. 

Dr. McKnight has been a bituminous coal 
operator since 1895, opening and running the 
Toby Valle.y Coal Company, also the ^Ic- 
Knight Coal Company, which are still (in 
1913) in active operation. 

As a writer Dr. McKnight is the author of 
"My First Recollections of Broolndlle, Pa.," 
"Recollections of Ridgway. Pa.." also of the 
"Pioneer History of Jefferson County, Pa.," 
"A Pioneer Ovitline History of Northwestern 
Pennsylvania," embracing fourteen counties, 
and of "Pioneer Sketches of the Cities of Al- 
legheny, Beaver. DuBois, and Towanda, Pa." 
And now. in 1913. as director and vice presi- 
dent of the National Bank of Brookville, Pa., 
merchant, coal operator, writer and author, 
he is still active. 

Dr. McKnight married Penelope Goddard 
Clarke, Jan. 9, 1860, and they celebrated their 
golden wedding Jan. 9, 1910. Seven children 
were born to this union, four of whom are 
now lix-ing. viz.: Amor Archer; Mary Ade- 
line, wife of H. H. Kennedy ; Jay Byron ; and 
Bonnie, the wife of George R. Matson. All 
reside in Brookville. 

COL. AMOR ARCHER McKNIGHT was 
a gi-eat-grandson of Alexander and Isabella 
(McBride^i McKnight, natives of County 
Down. Ireland. About the year 1790 they 
immigrated to Franklin county. Pa. Alex- 
ander McKnight here pursued agriculture. 
In 1795 he removed to and located on the 
place now known as the I\IcKnight farm, on 
Crooked Creek, in Washington township, In- 
diana Co., Pa. Six children were born to his 
union with Isabella McBride, two sons and 
four daughters, the sons being Alexander, Jr., 
and James. 

Janies McKnight, son of Alexander and 
Isabella CMcBride) McKnight, located in the 
town of liidiaiia, where he died May 14. 1819. 
aged about forty-one years. He filled a num- 
ber of offices there credit^nbly. lieing an excel- 
lent scholar. He was the first burgess of the 
new borough of Indiana in 1816, and was re- 



elected to that office for the year 1817. He 
was commissioners' clerk for the years 1807 
and 1811. He was county treasurer for the 
years 1811-12. When the Indiana Academy 
was incorporated, March 28, 1814, Rev. John 
Jamieson and James JMcKnight were two of 
the thirteen trustees. He married Jane Mc- 
Nutt, May 25, 1807, and to this union were 
born two children: William, born Mav 5, 
1808, who died Jiyie 9, 1830, in Blairsville, 
Pa. ; and Alexander, born June 9, 1810. Jane 
McKnight, the mother of these children, died 
Aug. 15, 1811. James McKnight married 
(second) Nov. 19, 1812, Jane ilcComb, and 
to this union were born three children, viz. : 
(1) James, Jr., born Sept. 9, 1813; while a 
young man he migrated to Texas, where he 
was elected mayor of Galveston city. Losing 
his health, he died in South America, while 
on a visit, aged forty years. (2) John died 
in infancy. (3) Jane accompanied he» 
brother to Texas, where she was twice mar- 
ried. Her first husband. Colonel Sandusky, 
was secretary to Gen. Sam Houston, the first 
president of the Texas republic. 

Alexander McKnight. second son of James 
and Jane (ilcNutt) MeKnidit. married Mav 
10, 1831, JIary Thompson, daughter of Wil- 
liam Thompson, of Altman's Run, and grand- 
daughter of Rev. John Jamieson, the pioneer 
preacher to locate in Indiana. Alexander and 
Mary (Thompson) ^IcKnight commenced 
married life in Blairsville, Indiana Co., Pa., 
and on the 19th day of Slay. 1832, their son 
Amor Archer was born; he afterward became 
distinguished in the war for the Union as 
colonel of tlie 105th Regiment of Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers. Late in the fall of 1832 
the young couple moved into the wilderness 
of Jefferson county. Pa., locating in Brook- 
ville, and Alexander taught the first term of 
school in the borough. Their son W. J. ile- 
Knight was born in Brookville, ]\Iay 6, 1836. 
Alexander McKnight was a good scholar, but 
having contracted fever and ague in New Jer- 
sej% was an invalid : yet he filled the offices 
of lieutenant colonel in the militia, justice of 
the peace and county treasurer, holding the 
latter position at the time of his death, which 
occurred in June. 1837, when he was but 
twenty-seven years old. 

Amor Archer JIcKnight, son of Alexander 
and J\Iary (Thompson) McKnight. was born 
in Blairsville. Indiana county. May 19, 1832. 
In November, 1832, he was brought by his 
parents to Broolcville, Jefferson county, and 
in June. 1837, his father died. At an early 
age young McKnight returned to Blairsville 




AMOR ARCHER McKNIGHT 
Colonel 105th Reg't. Pa. Vols. 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



931 



and learned the art of printing in the Appa- 
lachian office, and afterward worked for Mr. 
Samuel MeElhose on the Jefferson Star, of 
Brookville, Jefferson Co., Pa. In 1853 he 
was admitted to the bar, and entered into 
partnership with the late George W. An- 
drews, Esq. He had a strong predilection 
for military matters, and from 1854 until the 
breaking ovit of the Civil war had been cap- 
tain of a militia companj' called the "Brook- 
ville Rifles." Long before the actual storm 
burst he felt that trouble was at hand, and as 
early as the winter of 1860 commenced to 
recruit his company so as to be ready when 
the emergency might arise. When the news 
of the firing upon Sumter reached him he at 
once offered the services of his company, and 
with Company I, Sth Pennsylvania Regiment, 
served three mouths. As soon as that term 
of service had expired he recruited the 105th 
Pennsylvania Regiment, a regiment that had 
no superior in the Civil war. A rigid disci- 
plinarian, he made his command one whose 
fame was known throughout the Army of the 
Potomac. He was an intrepid, daring soldier, 
winning the praise of his superior officers, and 
fell May 3, 1863, at the head of his gallant 
veterans in the battle of Chancellorsville 
while leading them against the command of 
Stonewall Jackson, who had fallen only a few 
hours before. 

Amor Archer McKnight at an early age 
evinced a deep love for study, and proved an 
apt and diligent student in the common schools 
and the Brookville Academy, obtaining a good 
average education. He was a close, careful 
reader, and when quite young gathered to- 
gether, as his means would permit, a collec- 
tion cf books, which in after years proved the 
nucleus of an excellent and extensive library. 
The death of his father when he was so very 
young made him the main support of his 
mother and her little family, and the loving 
care he gave that mother as long as she lived 
was one of his pleasant duties. 

The late Mr. Samuel MeElhose, who was 
editor of the Star, in his notice of Colonel 
McKnight 's death said of him: "He was an 
excellent workman; what he found to do he 
did with all his might." The practical and 
general knowledge he gained in the printing 
office, he admitted in after years, had been of 
incalculable benefit to him. On leaving the 
Star office he entered the law office of W. P. 
.Tenks, Esq., where he applied himself to the 
study of law half of each day; the balance 
of the time he had to work at the "case" in 
the printing office, as a means of support. 



At the February term, 1855, he was admitted 
to practice, and soon afterward entered into 
partnership with G. W. Andrews, Esq. 
Their firm was one of the most successful and 
had as large a practice as any at the Brook- 
ville bar. When the first alarm of war 
sounded forth he was one of the first to en- 
list in defense of his country, but his military 
record is given elsewhere in the history of his 
regiment. The court of Jefferson county ap- 
pointed R. Arthurs, W. P. Jenks, G. W. An- 
drews, A. L. Gordon and D. Barclay, Esqs., 
to report resolutions upon the death of Col- 
onel McKnight, when he fell at Chancellors- 
ville, one of which reads as follows: 

"Resolved, That whether regarded as a sol- 
dier, patriot, citizen, friend, brother, or pro- 
tector of his aged parent. Colonel ilcKnight 
was true to duty. By his death our country 
has lost one of its brightest ornaments, the 
legal profession a well-informed, trustworthy 
and honorable member." 

Again, on May 27th, the Star said: "He 
eared most tenderly and affectionately for his 
mother. He mourned in deep sorrow over 
her death, and gave the most convincing 
proofs of the great nobleness of his heart. No 
man is without his faults, and of course he 
had his, but one trait we cannot overlook, 
and that was his perfect abstinence from gam- 
bling and intemperance. He spent his earn- 
ings for standard books, and his spare time 
in perusing them. He was laborious and stu- 
dious. He was fearless and outspoken, gen- 
err, us and obliging, he was an ardent admirer 
of the free institutions of his native land, of 
the right of man to self government, and 
loathed the institution of human slavery. His 
career on earth is ended. He has sealed his 
love of country with his life's blood." Col- 
onel McKnight never married. 

The biography of his brother. Dr. W. J. 
McKnight, appears above. 

REV. JOHN JAMIESON was born at 
Thorn Hill farm, Scotland, about eight miles 
from Glasgow, in 1747. His father was Allen 
Jamieson. One of Allen Jamieson's ancestors 
was land steward to Mai-y Queen of Scotland. 
This ancestor turned Protestant, left the 
court and returned to Thorn Hill farm. Al- 
len Jamieson was a descendant of Robert 
Bruce,' who was crowned King of Scotland in 
1306. In this same year Bruce was defeated 
by an army of English and fled to Ireland, 
whence he afterward returned to Scotland, 
fought many engagements, and in 1314 de- 
feated King Edward at the battle of Ban- 



932 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



uockburn, after which in 1328 Bruce was ac- 
knowledged king, and Scotland declared in- 
dependent. At this time Bruce had the lep- 
rosy and died from it in 1329, having reigned 
almost twenty-four years. 

All Scotch people who spell their name 
Jamieson are of one blood, to wit: Jamie's 
son. 

Rev. John Jamieson enjoyed the advan- 
tages of wealth. He graduated from St. An- 
drew's University, and studied theology with 
Rev. John Brown, of Haddington. Rev. 
John Jamieson was licensed and ordained by 
a burgher presbytery of Scotland in about his 
twenty-fifth year. He preached from the He- 
brew and Greek Bible, translated his own 
texts, and was an expert shorthand writer. 
According to his diary he preached at Bath- 
gate, Scotland, in 1776. Rev. John Jamie- 
son's early life embraced a stormy period in 
Scotland, between the Scotch and the English. 
His adult life was suiTOunded b.y a period of 
literary activity. The poems of Ramsay, 
Thompson, Burns, Scott, Holmes and others 
were written and published from 1730 to 
1785. The known Scottish poets then ex- 
ceeded two thousand. In 1775 Rev. John 
Jamieson married Agnes (otherwise called 
Nancy) Gibbs, daughter of John Gibbs, of 
Paisley. Gibbs' wife was a Miss Jackson. 
The young couple set up housekeeping in 
Edinburgh, Scotland, where they resided 
seven years. Three children were born to 
them in that city, viz.: Jeanette, John and 
Agnes, otherwise called Nancy. Rev. John 
Jamieson, considering himself prepared for 
thorough gospel labor, determined to migrate 
to America and devote his life to missionary 
work in the new world. It might be well to 
state here that Pollock, author of the ' ' Course 
of Time," was born on the adjoining farm, 
and that these two farms are now literally 
covered with houses and form a part of 
greater Glasgow. At the age of thirty-six, 
with his wife and three children. Rev. John 
Jamieson started from Edinburgh, Scotland, 
for America, and in the latter part of Novem- 
ber, 1783, landed in Philadelphia, Pa., where 
he immediately connected himself with the As- 
sociate Reformed Church. He resided liere 
and went on missionary journeys on horse- 
back through the wilderness as far south and 
west as the Carolinas and Georgia, until Sept. 
22, 1784, when he located at Big Spring, Cum- 
berland Co., Pa., at which place he preached 
in a log church for eight years, also in houses 
and barns at other points, to wit: Stony 
Ridge, Shippensburg, Marsh Creek and Cono- 



cocheague. He also purchased six hundred 
acres of land and erected a gristmill at or 
near Big Spring, and his son John (Jr.) re- 
sided here until after 1809. Three children 
were born to Mr. and j\Irs. Jamieson while 
living at Big Spring, viz. : William, Isabelle 
and Margaret. 

In the early spring of 1792 Mr. Jamieson 
resigned his charges in Cumberland county 
and crossed the Allegheny mountains with 
his wife and three children, with their effects, 
all on horseback, or pack horses, and located 
in Hannastown, in Westmoreland county, 
leaving John Jamieson (Jr.) and two other 
children on the homestead at Big Spring. In 
1794 he removed to Derry, and in 1796 to 
Altman's Run, where he erected his log cabin 
in what is now Conemaugh or Blacklick town- 
ship, Indiana Co., Pa., being the first minister 
to locate in what is now Indiana county. 

In 1794 Rev. John Jamieson organized the 
Crete Church, in Indiana county, preaching to 
the people first from a small platform, 5 by 8 
feet, supported by wooden brackets between 
two large oak trees, the congregation being 
seated on logs on the ground. His mode of 
preaching was to lecture or expound the Scrip- 
tui-e in the morning, and to preach a sermon 
divided into firstly, secondly, etc., in the after- 
noon. At Crete a tent was secured for a 
while, and then, in 1815, a log church, 24 by 
30, was erected. He preached at this point 
until near 1820. From his diary it is found 
that he also preached at Conemaugh, Crooked 
Creek, Bethel (Indiana county). Plum Creek 
and Kittanning, and that he held services in 
cabins and log barns. The names of these 
places, dates, etc., are recorded in his diar.y, 
as well as notes of texts and sermons, many 
of these in shorthand. The country being 
new, he proceeded from settlement to settle- 
ment. For roads he had forest paths ; bridges 
there were none, and in devotion to duty he 
braved alike the beasts of the forest, the sum- 
mer's heat and the winter's cold. Truly his 
was the "voice of one crying in the \vilder- 
ness " ; in the wilderness crying almost daily 
somewhere for thirty-six years, either in the 
open air, or in the cabin in the woods, in the 
log barn or in the log chiirch. 

The Associate Reformed Church flourished. 
It spread rapidly to the westward, and was 
largely and steadily increased by immigra- 
tion. In 1793 he had a firm hold on the ter- 
ritory now known as Western Pennsylvania. 
In that year the original Presbytery of Penn- 
sylvania was divided into two — the Fii-st and 
Second Associate Reformed Presbyteries of 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



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2. «'r 



Rev. John Jamieson 's Shorthand. A sermon written and delivered by him, in 
Bathgate, Scotland, February, 1776. This is photographed from his diary book of 
lectures, sermons and notes from 1776 to 1800. The system is dead and there 
is no key to it. (Isaac Pitman was born in 1813 and published his system in 
1836.) When this sermon was written it was a crime (conspiracy) to write 
phonography. 

[Plate loaned by Dr. W. J. McKnight.] 



934 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Pennsylvania. The Second, by order of the 
Synod, took the name of the Monongahela. It 
was composed of four ministers — Revs. Jolm 
Jamieson. Henderson, Warwick and Rankin, 
■with their elders. This was the first presby- 
tery organized in connection witli any of the 
Reformed Churches west of the Allegheny 
mountains. Its boundary lines were the Alle- 
gheny mountains on the east and the Pacific 
ocean on the west. 

Jamieson was a man of decided abilities 
and theological attainments, so that his pres- 
bytery placed its theological students under 
his care, Alexander Porter, Alexander McCoy 
and Da^^d Proudfit. 

From 1783 to at least 1816 Mr. Jamieson 
went about his Master's business. Money he 
did not need, for every cabin door was open 
wide to him, while his wife and family were 
busy at his own cabin raising food, scutching, 
spinning, weaving, knitting and making the 
family homespun clothing. 

Of the twenty-six religious bodies in Penn- 
sylvania that Rev. John Jamieson organized 
through his personality, twenty-four are 
strong, wealthy United Presbyterian 
Churches, each under the jurisdiction of one 
of the following presbyteries: Big Spring, 
Westmoreland, Conemaugh or ilouongahela. 
Of the two remaining organizations one is a 
Covenanter Church, Alexandria, Westmore- 
land county, and the other is the Covenanter 
Church at Clarksburg, Indiana county. 

Rev. John Jamieson was six feet, three 
inches high, and dignified in bearing. Men- 
tally he was able, thoroughly educated, and 
possessed wonderful vigor, energy and endur- 
ance. His voice was strong, clear and far- 
reaching; his oratory magnetic, holding the 
attention of his hearers as well through a 
long service as a short one. To aid in the 
civic interests of Indiana county he contracted 
for the erection of the first county jail. He 
served as county commissioner for Indiana 
county for the years 1809, 1810 and 1811. He 
was actively engaged in educational matters, 
and was one of the pioneer trustees of the 
Indiana Academy, incorporated INIarch^ 28, 
1S14. It appears in his diary that he was ac- 
tivijly and regularly preaching in and around 
Kittanning from 1813 to Jan. 8. 1815; in 
Freeport region from 1813, and what is now 
West Union and Conemaugh, Plumville and 
Crete up to 1816; his services in these years 
were held in cabins and barns and log 
churches. 

He died in March, 1821, aged seventy-four 
years, and is buried at Crete, Indiana Co., 



Pa. His wife, Nancy, died in 1841, aged 
ninety-one, and is buried at Lewisville, In- 
diana Co., Pa. Their daughter Agnes mar- 
ried William Thompson, and had three sons 
and two daughters, to wit : Hon. Joh,n Jamie- 
son Ypsilanti, Rev. Robert, William Gordon, 
Nancy and Mary. Nancy married Washing- 
ton Craig, of Clarion county. Pa. Calvin A. 
Craig, second colonel of the 105th Regiment, 
who was killed at Deep Bottom, Ya., was one 
of this family. Mary married Alexander Mc- 
Knight, who left two sons, to wit : Col. Amor 
Archer McKnight, of the 105th Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, who was killed while leading a 
charge at Chancellorsville, Va., and William 
James McKnight. 

William Thompson and wife settled on a 
farm near Lewisville, Indiana Co., Pa. This 
farm was deeded by Rev. John Jamieson and 
Agnes, his wife, to William Thompson and 
Agnes Jamieson Thompson, his wife, the deed 
being dated March 26, 1817, and afterward 
known as the "John Gallagher Farm." 

Col. Robei-t M. Thompson, of New York 
City, is a son of John Jamieson Ypsilanti 
Thompson and grandson of William and 
Agnes (Jamieson) Thompson. The Colonel 
has a world celebrity in naval, athletic, finan- 
cial and charitable cii'cles. — [Contributed by 
Dr. W. J. McKnight.] 

MATTHEW H. HENRY, now living re- 
tired at Blairsville, Indiana county, is a mem- 
ber of a family of Scotch-Irish extraction 
which has been associated with the growth and 
progress of Indiana county for over eighty 
years. 

John Henrj', the first of the family to set- 
tle in Indiana county. Pa., was a native of 
Ireland, born near Londonderi-y, in County 
Deri-y, where he grew to manhood. There he 
married Margaret ^liller. In 1833, with his 
wife and one child, he sailed from Belfast, 
Ireland, for the New World, and after a seven 
weeks' passage landed in New York, ilaking 
their way west by canal and the other means 
of transportation then available, they located 
first in Young township, Indiana county, 
where they rented the farm of Matthew Har- 
bison. After farming there for a short pe- 
riod they moved to Armstrong township, same 
county, settling on a tract of seventy-three 
acres of uncultivated land. They were the 
pioneers in that section. Mr. Henry built a 
little log house and made strenuous efforts to 
clear the land. Three years later, when his 
hard work was meeting with some success, he 
met with an accident at a barn raising from 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



935 



the effects of which he died in March, 1838. 
He was buried in the West Union cemetery, 
near the homestead farm. The widow, left 
with five small children to care for, and eking 
out an existence as best she could, had a hard 
struggle, but she worked day and night to 
keep her family together and succeeded. She 
grew her own wool and flax, carded it and 
wove it into cloth, and rode on horseback from 
her home to Blairsville to dispose of the prod- 
uct for the necessaries of life. It was a trip 
of thirty-two miles. In spite of toil and hard- 
ships she lived to the age of seventy-three 
years, dying in 1876 at her home, a comfort- 
able frame structure which had supplanted 
the log cabin. She bore her struggles with 
the Christian fortitude for which she was 
noted, and instilled her faith into her chil- 
dren, whom she lived to see surrounded with 
comforts. She was a consistent member of 
the Reformed Presbyterian Chui-ch in every 
sense of the word. The five children were as 
follows : Sarah Jane, who married John Cold- 
well, resided in Armstrong township, and died 
in Young township ; Catherine married Rob- 
ert Blakley (deceased) and (second) Samuel 
M. Knox; Margaret married William Dean, 
and both are deceased; John married Martha 
Porsythe and passed all his life on the home 
farm (both are deceased) ; Matthew H. is 
mentioned below. 

Matthew H. Henry was born in the little 
log cabin on the homestead farm Aug. 18, 
1838, five months after the death of his father. 
Though he never knew the love or devotion of 
a father he was tenderly cared for by a sac- 
rificing mother. His opportunities for ac- 
q^^iring an education were limited to the ad- 
vantages afforded by the local school, which 
was two miles distant from the home. He 
grew up on the farm and worked it with his 
brother John until twenty-one years old, af- 
ter which he spent two years with his widowed 
sister, Mrs. Blakley, in Young township, op- 
erating her farm. Returning to the home- 
stead, he farmed that place with his brother 
John for one year, and then settled on the 
Alexander Gilmore farm (in Young town- 
ship), where for a period of thirty-eight years 
he was engaged in general agi-iculture and 
stock raising. During twenty-five years of 
this time he was a dealer in all kinds of live 
stock, buying in western Pennsylvania and 
finding a market in Philadelphia and other 
near-by places. He shipped a carload of 
stock each week for a period of three years. 
In 1901 he retired from farming and located 
in Blairsville, where for five years he was 



engaged in the retailing of meat and other 
products. Then he turned over the business 
to his sons and has since lived retired in 
Blairsville. In 1896 he was elected county 
commissioner, which office he filled for three 
years. While a resident of Young township 
he filled the office of school director for six 
years, and was for eight years assessor of the 
township. He is a member of the United 
Presbyterian Church and was elder of his 
church in Young township for nine years. He 
has filled the office of elder in IBlairsville 
Church for four years. Mr. Henry is a stanch 
Republican, though not a politician in the 
ordinary meaning of the word. He is con- 
sidered a thoroughlv good citizen. 

On Feb. 14, 1862, Mr. Henry married in 
Young township, Indiana county, Mary Jane 
Lowman, who was born in that township in 
1843, a daughter of Jacob and Susan Low- 
man. Mrs. Henry died in January, '1894, the 
mother of eight children: (1) John G., iDom 
at West LelDanon. Pa., Dec. 16, 1862, is a 
traveling salesman for the United States Steel 
Company and resides in Des Moines, Iowa. 
On Dec. 30, 1886, he was mamed at Indiana, 
Pa., to Clara Thomas, and they have one 
daughter, Mary Thomas, born June 21, 1896, 
at No. 204 Coltart Square, Pittsburg, Pa. (2) 
Susan Elizabeth, born Dec. 20, 1866, married 
Dr. Albert S. Kaufman, of New Kensington, 
Pa., born June 11, 1869. and they have had 
a family of eight children, namely: Mary 
M., born Aug. 5, 1893; Albert R., Sept. 5, 
1895; Grace Elizabeth. July 5, 1898 (died 
Feb. 21, 1900): Anna Bell, Nov. 25, 1900; 
Ruth D., Feb. 28, 1903 (died Aug. 23, 1905) ; 
Helen. Oct. 13, 1905 ; Elanor Louise, Jime 8, 
1908; Lois Caroline, Dec. 9, 1910. (3) Wil- 
liam Lowman, born Sept. 20, 1869, resides on 
the homestead in Young township. On June 
9. 1897, he married Lyda M. Cribbs, who was 
born May 20, 1876, and they have four chil- 
dren: Mathew Frank, born Jan. 29, 1898; 
Marv Esther. April 4. 1899; Rubv, July 13, 
1901 ; John, Feb. 3, 1904. (4) Clark M., born 
March 12, 1872, succeeded his father in the 
meat business at Blairsville. (5) George H., 
born Dec. 19, 1874, is with the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company and resides at New Ken- 
sington, Pa. On April 18, 1900, he married 
Lola Belle Shaffer, who was born Nov. 11, 
1880, and they have three children, who were ' 
born as follows: Albert Franklin. Jan. 
22, 1901 ; Mary Elizabeth, Sept. 27, 1904 ; and 
Charles Matthew, Dee. 20, 1908. (6) IVTat- 
thew Hugh Dean, born March 1, 1876. died 
in 1895. (7) Alexander Ross, born Nov. 13, 



936 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



1879, is a contractor and builder in Los An- 
geles, Cal. On July 17, 1907, he married 
Eartha Miller, of Los Angeles, and they have 
one child, A. Ross, Jr., bom April 17, 1912. 
(8) Robert S., born Jan. 20, 1882, is engaged 
with his brother Clark M. in the meat busi- 
ness. 

Mr. Henry married for his second wife, 
July 5, 1901, Sybilla Kells, who was born in 
Livermore, Pa., daughter of Robert and Mary 
( Cunningham ) Kells, and widow of John Fer- 
guson, who died May 22, 1895. He is fully 
mentioned elsewhere in this work. 

KBELY is an honored name in Indiana 
county, where many of its representatives are 
to be found occupying positions of trust and 
responsibility in the various communities to 
which they have scattered. The family his- 
tory is interesting and in brief is as follows : 
• Daniel Keely, grandfather of Daniel Keely 
and great-grandfather of James Milton 
Keeley, both respected residents of Cone- 
maugh township, was a native American, who 
lived for a time in Ligonier Valley, but later 
moved to Conemaugh township, settling near 
tlie salt works on the township line, upon a 
farm which he purchased (now owned by a 
Mr. McBride and known as the Saltsburg Ex- 
tension). Daniel Keely followed farming all 
his long and useful life. He was buried in the 
Saltsburg cemetery. He married Jane Ed- 
dings, who was born near Poke Run Church, 
in Westmoreland county. Pa., and the chil- 
dren born to them were as follows: John, 
who married Nancy "Watson, was a tanner by 
trade, and lived near Boiling Springs, Arm- 
strong Co., Pa.; Samuel is mentioned below; 
Hannah married Joe Anderson, a hotel-keeper 
of Saltsburg; Eliza married John Kipp; An- 
nie married a Mr. Kennedy; Mary married 
Henry McKallip, a merchant of Leechburg; 
Jane married Samuel Culp, a carpenter; Al- 
ice married John Imon, a farmer; Susan mar- 
ried Thomas Gleason, a farmer ; Amanda mar- 
ried James Wyatt, an oil developer and farm- 
er of Crooked Creek, Armstrong count v. 

Samuel Keely, son of Daniel Keelv, was 
bom in 1807, and died in 1882. Hi.s birth 
occurred in what is now known as Saltsburg 
Extension, Conemaugh township, near the salt 
works, and he remained with his pai-ents on 
the farm, later taking charge of the property. 
He also engaged with Samuel M. Kier, owner 
of canal boats, and became captain of a sec- 
tion boat, which ran from Philadelphia to 
Pittsburg, over the mountains. Mr. Keely 
was also employed in the salt works for some 



time, but finally devoted all his time to farm- 
ing, becoming the owner of two farms, one 
of 140 acres, and the other of 118 acres. The 
first farm he sold before his death, which oc- 
curred while he was living ^^^th his son Dan- 
iel, who cared for him in his declining years. 
His remains were laid to rest in Saltsburg 
cemetery. 

Samuel Keely married Jane E. Barber, who 
was born in 1822, and died in 1908, daughter 
of John and Elizabeth (Barber) Barber. 
Eighteen children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Samuel Keely, but thirteen of them died in 
infancy, the others being: Daniel; Sarah 
Elizabeth, who married Isaac Barber, a re- 
tired oil worker and rural mail carrier of 
Paulton, Westmoreland Co., Pa.; John, who 
married j\Iatilda Couch, and is in the oil busi- 
ness at Pleasantville, Pa., owning thirty-five 
oil wells: William N., a farmer, living in 
Nebraska ; and Samuel H., who married Ma- 
tilda Whatt, mentioned below. 

A man of quiet, unostentatious manner, 
devoted to his family, and a hard worker, 
Samuel Keely was a most estimable citizen, 
and a credit to his locality, as well as to his 
name. He did much to advance agricultural 
interests in Conemaugh township, and always 
was willing to try new methods, although 
many ideas now generally accepted were not 
thought of in the days of his activity. Trying 
to practice the Golden Rule in his everyday 
life, he had developed into a fine character, 
and earned and held public esteem, although 
he did not aspire to come before the people as 
a candidate for office. Such men as he are 
rare in these days of self-advancement, and 
his memory is tenderly cherished by his 
family and by many friends as well, and his 
example is held up to the rising generation as 
one to follow, for such a life leads to honor 
and prosperity. 

Daniel Keely, son of Samuel Keely, and 
grandson of Daniel Keely, was born Nov. 12, 
1842, on the homestead that his father and 
grandfather owned. He attended the local 
schools during the winter, and in the sum- 
mer, as was the custom, worked on the farm. 
In 1867 the family moved to his present farm, 
on which he and his father built the present 
residence. This was completed and ready for 
occupancy in the fall of 1867, and they then 
turned their attention toward the erection of 
suitable bams and outhouses. TJie property 
comprises 116 acres, all of which is operated 
by Mr. Keely, as a general farmer and stock 
raiser. His methods are recognized as ad- 
vanced in character, for he is a ]iraetical man. 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



937 



one who realizes that farming does not stand 
still any more than any other line of busi- 
ness, and that the man who succeeds is the 
one who is willing to get out of a iiit and use 
every means at hand to further his ends. His 
home is beautifully located on the brow of a 
hill, so that there is a magnificent view of 
the Conemaugh and Kiskiminetas rivers. 

In 1868 Mr. Keely married Margaret 
Sweeney, by whom he had two children : Mar- 
garet Jane, who died in infancy; and Annie, 
who married Harvey McClellan, and is now 
deceased. Mr. Keely 's second marriage was 
to Ruth A. Johnson, by whom he has the 
following children: William, engaged as a 
roller in a tin plate mill at New Castle, Pa., 
married a Miss Waddle and resides in New 
Castle; Julia married Robert Woodend, cap- 
tain of a company of the Pennsylvania Na- 
tional Guard; Emma R. married John C. 
Frampton, who works in a tin plate mill at 
New Castle; Samuel B., a teamster, married 
Martha V. Richards ; Roy D. married Mar- 
garet Weinell ; Jennie is at home ; Eugenia 
is at home ; Olie is at home. 

Mr. Keely is an independent Democrat, and 
has been active in township affairs, serving 
on the election board all of his mature life. 
For nine years he was road supervisor, serv- 
ing as such with William Bert, Isaac Mc- 
Laughlin and Thomas Hughes when the ma- 
cadamized road from Saltsburg to Clarksburg 
was built, and feels proud of that monument 
to his enterprise and public spirit. He be- 
longs to the Presbyterian Church, and is 
active in its good work. It is difficult to 
express in so brief a record all that such a 
man as Mr. Keely has become, has accom- 
plished. Not only is he a good farmer and 
business man, but he has developed into the 
best kind of citizen, one who places public 
interest before private gains, and whenever 
he has been in office has given his constitu- 
ents conscientious service and handled public 
affairs wisely and capably. 

Samuel H. Keely, son of Samuel Keely and 
grandson of Daniel Keely, was for years a 
well-known farmer of Young township, this 
county. While residing in that township he 
rented land upon which he farmed during 
earlier years. Eventually, however, he bought 
the farm upon which he still resides with his 
wife, and is one of the substantial agricul- 
turists of the county. 

He man-ied IMatilda Whatt. and they have 
had five children, as follows : James jMilton ; 
Hattie Bell, who is unmarried ; Minnie Pearl, 
who married John Kennedv. and resides at 



Vandergrift, Pa. ; Jane, who married Charles 
Shields ; and Myrtle, who is unmarried. 

Mr. Keely has always endeavored to live 
up to his best ideals, and has endeared him- 
self to all who know him. Never desiring 
public life, he has spent his strength in car- 
ing for his own, and his prosperity has been 
attained through hard, earnest effort, for he 
has had no outside assistance. His children 
have been carefully reared to honor their 
parents and obey the laws, and they have de- 
veloped into noble men and women, who are 
the pride of their parents, and substantial 
citizens of their neighborhoods. 

James Milton Keeley, dairyman of Cone- 
maugh township, was born Jan. 14. 1875, son 
of Samuel H. and Matilda (Whatt) Keeley, at 
White station, in Conemaugh township. 
Growing up at home, he received a common 
school training at Sloan's school house. After 
leaving school he engaged with Ira C. Ewings, 
a merchant, of Avonmore, Westmoreland Co., 
Pa., and remained with him for eighteen 
months. Following that he went to work for 
J. C. Moore, a hardware dealer, of Saltsburg, 
and remained with him for another eighteen 
months. His next position was with P. H. 
Laughlin & Co., proprietors of the steel mill in 
Conemaugh township, and he rose to be a 
sheet roller. Mr. Keeley remained with that 
firm for over fifteen years, gaining their full 
confidence, and left them only when the busi- 
ness was closed. However, as good a work- 
man as he had no difficulty in placing himself, 
and he engaged with W. L. Ray, at Adri, 
Conemaugh township, operating and cropping 
his farm for two years. Mr. Keeley then 
liought the J. O'Neil farm of 136 acres, for 
coming of a long line of agriculturists he is 
naturally fitted for farming, and since July 
15, 1910, when he went on his property, he has 
developed into one of the most enterprising 
farmers and dairymen of his township. He 
keeps about twenty cows, and retails his milk 
in Saltsburg. His farm is located one mile 
outside of Saltsburg, so that he is convenient- 
ly situated for the successful prosecution of 
liis dairy business. As his product is of the 
best quality, and produced according to the 
latest sanitary methods, he sells to the best 
trade in his field of opei-ations. In addition 
to his herd of cattle Mr. Keeley raises con- 
siderabfe stock, including several horses each 
year, which he sells to the market. His 
buildings are models of cleanliness and neat- 
ness, and he is proud of the fact that the 
inspectors find no fault with his arrangements. 
Such a man as he does much to raise the 



938 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



standard of excellence in the dairy business 
and consumers owe him a heavj^ debt for his 
conscientiousness and experienced conduct of 
his affairs. 

Mr. Keeley was united in marriage with 
Eliza Jane O'Neil, daughter of John O'Neil, 
who was born at Greenville, Indiana Co., Pa. 
Mr. and Mrs. Keeley are the parents of chil- 
dren as follows: Margai'et Helen, Nancy 
Mary, Virginia Pearl, Ralph Kermit and 
James Howard. 

In political faith Mr. Keeley is a Repub- 
lican, is now registered assessor, and has held 
a number of other township ofSces. He be- 
longs to the Saltsburg Presbyterian Church, 
in which he is an usher, while for years he 
has served as secretary of the Sunday school. 
Like others of his family 'Sir. Keeley is a 
man of home instincts, and takes his pleasure 
in the midst of his family. Ilis wife and chil- 
dren do him honor, and he is exceedingly 
proud of them, as he has every reason to be. 
The enterprise he has shown in all of his 
work demonstrates that in agricultural pur- 
suits he has discovered his natural calling, 
and his township is to be congratiilated upon 
the fact that he has returned to it and to the 
line of business which his ancestors found so 
profitable, for good farmers are rare and 
more needed than any other kind of workers. 

WILLIAM WORK HOPKINS, president 
of the Farmers' Telephone Co., of Armstrong, 
Jefferson and Indiana counties, is a lumber 
manufacturer and farmer of East Mahoning 
township, Indiana county, where he was born, 
on the Point Breeze farm, now owned bv 
him, July 10, 1852. 

The Hopkins family is an old and honored 
one in Indiana county, and is of Scotch-Irish 
extraction. John Hopkins, the founder of 
the family in this counti">'. was a native of 
Ireland, and coming to the United States in 
1791, located at Baltimore. JMd., where he 
spent four years. He then returned to Ire- 
land, but came back here in 1801, spent some 
time in Philadelphia, and then went to Adams 
county, Pa. Other sections were visited by 
him in a search for a pennanent home, and 
in 1808 he came to Indiana county, where, 
conditions suiting him. he located in what was 
then Wheatfield township. After eight years 
he came to the northern part of the county 
and purchassed a farm of ]6o acres in what 
is now East ^Mahoning township, paying one 
dollar per acre for same, and there he spent 
the remainder of his life, dying in 1851. when 
eighty-one years old. In 1809 he married 



Margaret Jamieson, who died in 1854. They 
were buried in the ilahoning graveyard, near 
Mahoning U. P. Church, of which they were 
members. 

John Hopkins, son of John Hopkins, was 
born in East Mahoning township in 1818, and 
there he gi'ew to manhood's estate. Like his 
father, he became a farmer, locating on part 
of the homestead, which is now known as 
Point Breeze farm and owned by William 
W. Hopkins. There he erected a residence 
and made other improvements, cariying on 
farming and stock raising mitil his death, 
which occurred April 27, 1898. He is buried 
in the cemetery attached to the Mahoning 
L'nited Presbyterian Church, having been one 
of its organizers and a consistent member. A 
Republican, he held local offices and was a 
man of sterling integi-ity. At one time he was 
a school director and always a friend of the 
public school system. 

John Hopkins married, in 1851, in East 
]Mahoning township, Miriam Scroggs Work, 
who was born Nov. 12, 1825, a daughter of 
Alexander Scroggs and Margaret (Brown) 
Work. Mrs. Hopkins died April 1, 1864, and 
is buried in the same cemetery as her hus- 
band. They had children as follows: Will- 
iam Work; Almira (Myra), born in June. 
1854, a school teacher, who married Dwite H. 
Cole and lives in Nebraska : Alexander Mur- 
i-ay, born in February. 1857, a farmer of East 
Mahoning township, who on March 12, 1891. 
married Rosetta Hamilton, a daughter of 
Hugh Hamilton: and ]\Iargaret. born in May, 
1859. who married Robert G. Work and died 
in May. 1881. 

William Work Hopkins was brought up on 
the homestead and attended the local schools, 
supplementing his meager educational advan- 
tages, however, with home reading and study. 
Working ou the farm until eighteen years of 
age, he then began learning the cai-penter's 
trade with his uncle. John B. Work, of West 
Mahoning township, who was located near 
Smicksburg. At first he received fifty cents 
a day for his labor, and after he became a 
.iourneyman his wages were one dollar a day. 
Completing his apprenticeship, he went to 
Pittsburg, where he received $2.50 per day. 
but later returning to Indiana county he lo- 
cated in Canoe towTiship, and an opportunity 
presenting itself established himself as a 
manufacturer of dooi-s, sashes and frames 
under the name of the Enterprise Lumber 
Company, acting as secretary, treasurer and 
bookkeeper of the concern. Eleven years later 
he came to West iMahoning towusliip. and for 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



eighteen years was one of the leading build- 
ers and contractors of the locality, erecting 
residences, schools and churches. After the 
death of his father, in 1898, he moved to the 
Point Breeze farm, and is now devoting his 
time to operating his property and handling 
his lumber business, as he has contracts for 
supplying the Buffalo. Rochester & Pittsburg 
Railroad Company with all kinds of lumber 
required by the road. He owns portable saw- 
mills and has operated with them in different 
parts of the country. 

In addition to his other concerns, Mr. Hop- 
kins is interested in the Farmers' Telephone 
Company of Armstrong, Indiana and Jeffer- 
son counties, and served as its treasurer for 
three years ; he has been its president for the 
past three years. Mr. Hopkins is essentially 
a self-made man, one who has risen steadily 
by reason of solid worth, and deseiwes the 
good fortune that has attended him. His farm 
shows that he takes a pride in its appearance, 
as its buildings are in excellent shape, well 
adapted for their several purposes, and his 
equipment is thoroughly modern. 

Mr. Hopkins takes a deep interest in the 
local schools and for sixteen years has been 
a school director, and was secretary of the 
board. He has also been auditor of his town- 
ship, as well as supervisor. 'Politically he 
was formerly a Republican, but with the 
organization of the Prohibition party he felt 
that its platform more nearly embodied his 
principles and he now gives it his hearty 
support. A temperate man himself, he lives 
out his own ideas, and exerts quite as much 
influence throiigh his example as by his pre- 
cepts, althQugh he is a good talker and knows 
how to present convincing arguments in favor 
of his cause. It is such men as he who are 
bringing about a more sane view with rela- 
tion to the liquor traffic and teaching the 
people what intemperance is costing the 
country in every respect. Mr. Hopkins is also 
very prominent in church work, serving as 
elder and trustee of the United Presbyterian 
Church, and is a popular Sabbath school 
teacher. His influence over young men is 
especially powerful and it would be difScult 
to say just how many he has convinced of 
the error of wrong living and turned into 
paths of rectitude and right. 

On Dec. 27, 1877, Mr. Hopkins was mar- 
ried to Laura Bell Ewing, a daughter of 
Thomas Ewing, of Nebraska, and she is a 
■devoted wife and mother and a consistent 
member of the United Presbyterian Church. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins are: 



Ruth Gertrude, bom in November, 1878, 
married Clark Steele, and lives on the home- 
stead; Lottie Myra, born in December, 1880, 
married J. T. Crawford, and lives in Wash- 
ington township ; Wallace Edwin was born, 
in July, 1883; John Paul, bom in March, 
1888, is at home; Mary, Louise, born in 
March, 1891, is a student in the normal school 
at Indiana, Pennsylvania. 

Wallace Edwin Hopkins, son of William 
Work Hopkins, began his edi;cation in the 
public schools of his native place, and taught 
school for two terms, after which he attended 
the State normal school at Indiana, being 
graduated therefrom. Then he taught in the 
winter in various districts, and the summer 
school at J\Iarion Center until he entered the 
University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, from 
which he graduated with the degree of JI. D. 
in 1912. He is now an interne in the Uni- 
versity hospital at Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

JOHN THOMPSON PARK is the owner 
of Park Place farm, a beautiful tract of 110 
acres overlooking the borough of Marion Cen- 
ter, Indiana county, where he has passed 
practically all his life, having been born there 
July 2, 1845, son of Roliert and Margaretta 
(Thompson) Park. The Park family has 
been closely associated with the history of the 
town from the very beginning, ilr. Park's 
grandfather, John Park, having laid out the 
place, and they have always held high stand- 
ing among its best citizens. 

The family is of Irish origin. Robert Park, 
great-grandfather of John Thompson Park, 
was married in 1775 in County Down, Ire- 
land, to Jane Bailey, and they had three 
children, namely: John and Mary, twins, 
bom Jan. 12. 1776. in Baltiwalter, County 
Down ; and Elizabeth, born there in 1782. In 
1794 this family removed to Philadelphia, 
where Robert Park instructed classes in 
mathematics, navigation and surveying. He 
died, however, about a year after his location 
there, in 1795-96, and his widow and children 
removed to Greencastle, Franklin Co., Pa.. 
Mrs. Park marrying Col. James Johnston, the 
surveyor, who resided near Greencastle. and 
whose name is associated with the early sur- 
veys of northern Indiana county. i\Irs. 
Johnston died in Johnstown, Cambria county, 
at the age of 108 years. 

John Park, born Jan. 12, 1776, in the town 
of Baltiwalter, County Down, Ireland, came 
to this country with his parents. He studied 
surveying with his father and stepfather, and 
received a commission as deputy surveyor for 



940 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



the western district of Pennsylvania from 
Governor Snyder. To quote from a history of 
Indiana county issued in 1891, "Marion (post 
oiSce Brady) is on Pine run in the southern 
part of East Mahoning township, and is the 
largest town north of the purchase line in 
Indiana county. It was laid out by John 
Park in 1842 and incorported as a borough in 
1872. 'Marion is situated on a tract of land 
which originally embraced 408 aci'es, the pat- 
ent of which was issued to James Johnston, a 
deputy surveyor, on the 31st of January, 
1798. In the patent the tract is called 
"Greenland," and is described as situated on 
the waters of Pine run. In 1795 John Park 
came to this portion of Pennsylvania to make 
surveys under the direction of Mr. Johnston. 
In 1798 he purchased the "Evergreen" body 
of land, though he did not get his deed until 
the 2d of December, 1803. In 1799 he erected 
a log cabin 16x20 in what is now the south- 
west end of the village, on the lot now owned 
by the Ritehey heirs. The Ritchey house 
stands on the old foundation. This is said to 
have been the second house erected in this 
section north of the purchase line. Elisha 
Chambers, Hugh Thompson, Fergus Moor- 
head, Jacob Shalleberger, William McHenry, 
five Seneca Indians, a squaw and a papoose 
were at the raising. The Indians, according 
to tradition, would not work until the bottle 
of whiskey was passed and each had drunk a 
portion thereof. Then, upon a signal from 
the chief, who shook energetically a gourd 
partly filled with coi-n, they went to work with 
much awkwardness but good-naturedly, and 
in a few hours the lone cabin had risen. 

" 'It is said that when Mr. Park first came 
to this region he encamped on the site of his 
cabin. Near it was a fine spring. On the 
opposite bank of the run were some Indians 
who had erected their wig\vams there, no 
doubt on account of the spring, as well as the 
abundance of game in the surrounding forest. 
After the raising they all went to Hugh 
Thompson's place, about two and one-half 
miles down Pine run, where the Indians and 
the whites had a grand frolic. The red men 
danced to the music of the shaken gourd, and 
there was naught to disturb the harmony of 
the hour.' 

"John Park was the life of the settlement 
that was gathering around the site of his fu- 
ture town. In 1810 he built a tanyard" 
(which was pati'Oiiized liy settlers and hunters 
for twenty and twenty-five miles around, for 
moccasin and shoe leather), "and soon after- 
wards tmilt 11 lioi'sc])ow('r gi'istmill, which li(> 



replaced in 1834 with a waterpower flouring- 
mill, with a capacity of thirty bushels per 
day. His son James had a cabinet factory 
and carpenter shop in connection with the 
mill for several years. 

"Marion was laid out by John Park in 
August, 1842, and the first sale of lots oc- 
curred in the succeeding month. The plat 
embraced eight acres, with one main street and 
two rows of lots on either side. The first house 
erected after the platting of the town was 
the residence of Hezekiah Wood, the pioneer 
chair and spinning-wheel maker. This is still 
standing" (until recently), "on the south 
side of West Main street, and is the property 
of John Riddle" (now belonging to Dr. 
Shields). "Mr. Wood worked at his trade in 
James Park's shop. The second Imilding was 
erected by James Park for James McKelvey, 
the first blacksmith. . . . The first painter 
was Linton Park, whose experience has justly 
entitled him to be designated as the master of 
the craft in the Mahoning Valley." 

John Park died Aug. 10, 1844. In 1807, 
in Greencastle. Franklin county, he married 
Mary Lang, daughter of Rev. James Lang, 
a Presbyterian minister, of White Spring, 
Franklin county. She died in 1864, when 
eighty-one years old. Jlr. and Mrs. Park 
were Presbyterians in religious connection. 
They had the following children : Jlargaret 
H. married Samuel Craig; Robert, born Jan. 
6, 1810, is mentioned below; Jane R., born 
Dec. 30, 1812, married Alexander Sutor ; 
Mary B., born Feb. 11, 1814, man-ied Joseph 
Brady; James L., born Aug. 25, 1816, married 
Susannah Early and (second) AnnaLoughry; 
Ann E., bom Dec. 13, 1818, married James 
Martin; Amanda, born May 5, 1821, married 
Robert Barbour; John, born Dee. 21, 1823. 
married Martha Curtiss (or Wibort) ; Linton, 
born Dee. 16, 1826, was for six years in the 
United States service, one year of which he 
was a member of the "Pi'esident's Guards," 
2d Regiment, District of Columbia (he en- 
graved the broad-axe presented to Lincoln in 
1860). Of this family, sons, sons-in-law, etc., 
there were thirteen in the Union army during 
the Civil war, two dying while in the service, 
and two others being wounded. 

Robert Park, son of John, bom Jan. 6, 
1810, passed all his life on the farm where 
his birth occurred, dying there July 10, 1899. 
He attended common school in the locality. 
His first marriage, wliich took place in Jan- 
uary, 1836, was to Mary Cannon, by whom 
he had four children : Hugh, wlio died in 
infancy; James, wlio died in infancy; Mary 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



L., born March 20, 1838 (now deceased), who 
married E. H. Griffith and became the mother 
of C. R. Griffith; and James (2), born June 
10, 1839. By his second wife, Margaretta 
(Thompson), whom he married in 1842, and 
who died April 13, 1851, Mr. Park had chil- 
dren: Matilda J., Mrs. A. W. Lang; John 
Thompson, mentioned below; Benjamin F., 
born June 12, 1847, now a resident of St. 
Louis, Mo., who was in the signal corps during 
the Civil war (he married) ; and Robert L., 
bom July 18, 1849, who died May 10, 1851. 
For his third wife Mr. Park married ilartha 
Caruthers (sister of Rev. John Caruthers), 
on May 28, 1866, and she died in 1885. They 
had no children. 

John Thompson Park spent his boyhood 
and youth in the manner of the average farm 
boy, receiving a common school education in 
the home locality. On June 26, 1863, he en- 
listed in Company A, 2d Battalion, Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry, for six months, and 
on Aug. 26, 1864, again enlisted, this time 
in Company A, 206th Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, for one year. He served until the 
close of" the war. Most of the time his regi- 
ment was stationed in front of Richmond, 
being the first regiment to enter the city. 

Returning home after the war was over, 
Mr. Park went to farming, and upon the 
death of his father became the owner of the 
home place, the management of which he had 
assumed long before. He is a typical repre- 
sentative of a family which has long stood 
high in the community. On Dec. 25, 1873, 
Mr. Park was married to Caroline Ryckman, 
of Marion Center, daughter of Tobias and 
Susan (Stoops) Ryckman, and they have had 
six children, namely: Franklin; Bertha M., 
wife of Dr. W. C. Byers, of Webster, Pa.; 
Howard; Margaretta, deceased; Charles, at 
home; and Dorothy. 

Mr. Park is a member of the M. E. Church. 
In political opinion he is a Republican, but 
he is independent in his support of the men 
and measures he approves. 

"WILLIAM H. McGregor, now engaged 
in business in the borough of Indiana, is the 
second son of James McGregor, for many 
years a prominent public official of Indiana 
county. The McGregor family is of Scottish 
origin, and its first representative in America, 
Alexander McGregor, was born in Scotland, 
and on arriving in this country settled in 
Pennsylvania, near Bedford, in Bedford 
county. He was a millwright by trade, but 



his principal business after settling in his 
new home was farming, he having purchased 
a place which he cultivated until his death. 

Daniel McGregor, son of Alexander, was 
born in Bedford county, where he grew to 
manhood, meantime learning the carpenter's 
trade. Coming to Indiana county, Pa., he 
lived in Washington township for four years, 
at the end of that time moving to Porter 
township, Jefferson county, where he made a 
permanent home, remaining there until his 
death, which occurred in April, 1880, in his 
eighty-ninth year. He followed farming. In 
religious connection he was a Baptist. 

Mahlon McGregor, one of the sons of Dan- 
iel, was born in 1810, in Bedford county. Pa., 
and when in his twenty-first year moved to 
Jefferson county, settling in Porter township. 
He was there engaged in farming and stock 
raising until 1869, when he moved to Cowan- 
shannock township, Armstrong county, pass- 
ing the remainder of his life there, engaged 
in the same line of work. His death occurred 
July 12, 1873. He was an enterprising and 
capable business man, and gave all his at- 
tention to his private affairs, taking no part 
in public matters. He was a Republican in 
politics. His wife, Margaret (Chambers), 
was born in Perry township, Jefferson Co., 
Pa., daughter of John Chambers, a wealthy 
farmer of Jefferson and Indiana counties, Pa., 
who also carried on the general mercantile 
business. Mrs. McGregor died Feb. 4, 1845, 
in her twenty-sixth year. She was baptized 
and married by the same minister, Rev. John. 
Carothers, who also preached her funeral ser- 
mon. Mr. and Mrs. McGregor were members 
of the Presbyterian Church. 

James McGregor was reared on his father's 
farm and attended the public schools of the 
neighborhood. When thirteen years old he 
went to work in a brickyard, where he was 
employed for one year, and he also continued 
his studies, three years later commencing to 
teach. He was thus engaged for one year, 
and then became clerk in a store. After seven 
years' experience in that capacity he em- 
barked in the mercantile business on his own 
account and in connection therewith also 
dealt in live stock, at ]\Iarion Center, Indiana 
coiinty. In 1884 he was honored with election 
to the oiSce of sheriff of the county, beginning 
his three years' term Jan. 1, 1885. -In 1889 
he was elected county register and recorder, 
taking office on the first Monday in January, 
1890, and being reelected at the close of the 
term, served another, having six yeai*s of 
continuous service in that office. He has also 



942 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



held local offices, having been school director 
of the borough of Marion Center for a long 
period and justice of the peace five years. 
In eveiy position to which he has been chosen 
he has justified the confidence of his fellow 
citizens, his ability and integrity having been 
demonstrated in a long career of successful 
business and official activity. His courtesy 
and invariable fairness in dealing with all 
made him exceedingly well liked in his various 
public capacities. He has always been a 
stanch Republican. For over forty years he 
has been a member of the Methodist Church, 
and he has been one of the most pffective 
workers in the congregations with which he 
has been associated, having served as presi- 
dent of the board of trustees of the church at 
Marion Center, and a member of the building 
committee which erected the present church 
there. After removing to the borough of 
Indiana, in 1884, where he has since lived, 
he was elected to the same position he had 
held at Marion, and was one of a committee 
which had charge of the building of the hand- 
some Meth'odist parsonage there, in 1888. 

On Sept. 20, 1860, Mr. McGregor was mar- 
ried to Catherine Pounds, daughter of John 
Pounds, of East Mahoning township, this 
county. Mrs. McGregor died March 11, 1880, 
leaving a family of eight children: Daniel 
E., William H., James C, May 0., Clara L.. 
Alice C, Anna D. and Hai-vey M. On March 
14, 1883, Mr. McGregor married (second) Mrs. 
Agnes A. (Duncan) Sutton, and of the chil- 
dren born to this marriage three survived, 
two sons and one daughter, John, Frank and 
Ola A. 

William H. McGregor was born at Marion 
Center in May, 1865, and received a public 
school education, attending until he reached 
the age of nineteen yeai's. He then engaged 
in the livery business at Greensburg, Pa., 
continuing same for several years, from that 
place moving to Indiana, where he embarked 
in the same line, in 1901 selling his interest. 
For the last several years he has been en- 
gaged in the manufacture of lightning rods 
at Indiana, and he is also interested in the 
oil business, being president of the American 
Independent Oil Company, producers of high- 
grade Pennsylvania oils and greases, dealers 
in petroleum and its products; the offices of 
the company are in the Marshall building 
at Indiana. Mr. McGi-egor is also one of the 
stockholders in the Savings & Trust Company, 
of Indiana. He may truly be called a self- 
made man, for he has attained a high position 
through his own efforts, and he is respected 



for his ability and intelligence as well as 
liked for his congenial disposition, which has 
won him many friends among his associates 
in the various relations of life. He is a 
Republican on political questions. 

On Aug. 24, 1899, Mr. McGregor married 
Julia Smith, of Cherrytree, Indiana Co., Pa., 
and they have two children: Paul Smith, 
born May 19, 1901 ; and William H., Jr., born 
March 20, 1903. 

Mrs. McGregor's great-great-gi-andfather, 
James Smith, arrived in Ireland with his 
cousin, the Prince of Orange, and remained 
there. All the male )nembers of this connec- 
tion were in the English army. One uncle 
of Mrs. Smith's father was a quartermaster 
general in the British army and died leaving 
large possessions in London, England ; his 
estate is unsettled. He was the father of two 
sons, James and William, one of whom died 
in a Spanish port, while captain of an Eng- 
lish frigate. 

Mrs. McGregor's great-grandfather Smith 
was a captain in the English army. His 
brother David was taken prisoner at York- 
town, during the war of the Revolution, and 
his brother Robert was at the burning of the 
church in New Jersey, and was taken pris- 
oner at Saratoga while serving as a soldier 
in the English army. 

William Smith, Mrs. McGregor's grand- 
father, was born in Ireland. He was a soldier 
during the rebellion of 1798 in that countiy. 
On May 25, 1829, he sailed from Dublin with 
his wife, Ellen (Finney), and their eight 
children, four sons and four daughters, for 
Quebec, Canada, where they arrived in Au- 
gust. One of the daughters died and was 
buried on the Island of Newfoundland. Ac- 
companying the family were three of William 
Smith's brothers, David, John and Andrew, 
and another brother, Robert, had preceded 
them, coming across the Atlantic as a soldier 
under General Pakenhani; he was at New 
Orleans when "Old Hickory" defeated the 
British in 1815, and remained in this coun- 
try, settling at Otsego, New York. 

William Smith brought his family to 
Schuylkill county. Pa. ; he and his wife died 
in Clearfield county, this State. Two of their 
sons served their adopted country as soldiers, 
William in the Mexican war under General 
Taylor, and Robert in the Civil war as a vol- 
unteer under General Hunter. 

David Finney Smith, son of William and 
Ellen (Finney)" Smith, was born May 3, 1821, 
in County Leitrim, Ireland, and came to 
America with the family, and passed the re- 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



943 



mainder of his life in western Pennsylvania, 
becoming one of the leading lumber merchants 
of that region. He married twice, the second 
time to Hanna E. Thompson, of Clearfield, 
by whom he had eight children, Mrs. William 
H. McGregor, of Indiana, being the eldest 
daughter. She obtained her education in the 
public schools at Cherrytree and at the Indi- 
ana (Pa.) State normal school. The Smiths 
are Episcopalians in religious connection. 

EEV. FRANCIS LEO WIECZOREK, pas- 
tor of St. Francis' Clnirch, at Rossiter, Pa., 
has been in Indiana county continuously since 
entering the priesthood. He is a native of 
Germany, born April 11, 1879, in Silesia, and 
there obtained his early education. He fur- 
thered his studies at Rome, completed his 
theological course at St. Vincent's College, 
Beatty (Latrobe), Westmoreland Co., Pa., 
where he was ordained to the priesthood by 
the Rt. Rev. Regis Canevin, Bishop of the 
Pittsbin-g diocese, June 28, 1908. celebrating 
his first mass at Mammoth, that county. The 
Bishop first appointed him pastor at Iselin, 
Indiana county, where he administered to the 
spiritual wants of his parishioners for a year 
and a half, after which he was stationed at 
Indiana borough as missionary pastor to 
Father McNeils, as such attending to the mis- 
sions in Clymer, Homer, Graeeton, Coi'al, 
Josephine, Lucerne, Ernest and Chambers- 
ville. Pa. In 1910 he was appointed pastor 
of St. Bonaventure Church at Josephine and 
of St. Francis' Church at Graeeton, Homer 
and Lucerne, both of Indiana count.v, where 
he labored zealouslj^ in the interest of the two 
parishes under his charge. His duties there 
were many and arduous, the parish of St. 
Bonaventure embracing Blacklick and Jo- 
sephine, and the parish of St. Francis Grace- 
ton, Lucerne, Coral and Homer City, with a 
membership in the former of three hundred 
and in the latter of five hundred. A number 
of nationalities are represented, and Father 
Francis, as he is popularly known, was par- 
ticularity well adapted to the work because 
of his ability as a linguist, having several 
languages at his command. He resided at 
Josephine, in one of the houses of the Jo- 
sephine Furnace & Coke Company, of whose 
emploj^ees (with their families) the popula- 
tion is practically composed. From that 
charge he was transferred July 18, 1912, to 
the present church at Rossiter, Pa., where in 
a short time he built a rectory and made 
many improvements in this parish and church. 
Father Wieczorek's genial personality has 



brought him into friendly relations with all 
his parishioners, and his devotion to their 
welfare, temporal as well as spiritual, has 
won him the aflieetionate esteem of all with 
whom he comes in contact. The diversity 
of nationalities, and consequent difference in 
temperament and s.ympathies, with which he 
has to deal, entails unusual responsibility in 
the management of his people, for he has had 
to overcome many prejudices and control 
racial tendencies not always easy to handle. 
But he is an untiring worker, and never dis- 
couraged in the task of keeping the various 
elements harmonious and working together 
for the general good. 

PROF. CHRISTOPHER A. CAMPBELL, 
for thirty-five years a teacher in the schools 
of Indiana county, is a native of this county, 
having been born in September, 1859, at Ar- 
magh, in East W^heatfield township, son of 
James Campbell. 

James Campbell, father of Prof. Chris- 
topher A. Campbell, was born on the old 
homestead in Indiana county, and followed 
farming all of his life. He became the owner 
of the homestead, which he cultivated and on 
which he made numerous improvements. He 
died in 1873, and was buried in Bethel Church 
cemetery, in West Wheatfield township, on 
Sept. 27, 1873. Mr. Campbell married Lethica 
Murphy, daughter of George Murphy, and 
she died in 1876 in Armagh, and was burled 
beside her husband. They were members of 
the LTnited Presbyterian Church, and the par- 
ents of eleven children : Jennie, bom July 2, 
1837, who died Oct. 20, 1861; Mary, bom 
March 27, 1839, who died young; Elizabeth, 
born Jan. 4, 1841, who died April 5, 1864; 
Annie, born Feb. 23, 1843, who married John 
D. Dreppo; Mary (2). bom Jan. 21, 1846, 
who married William Southwick, of Armagh ; 
John M., born Feb. 14, 1849, who died Oct. 
29, 1861; James, born Sept. 1, 1851, who 
died Oct. 20, 1861; Martha, bora June 15, 
1854, who died March 1, 1860 ; Thomas Jef- 
ferson, born Dec. 1, 1857. who died Dec. 26, 
1861 ; Christopher Alexander, bora Sept. 6, 
1859; and Margaret I., born Nov. 11, 1862, 
who married Rev. Mr. Dorer. 

Christopher A. Campbell received his pre- 
liminary education in the schools of East 
Wlieattield township, following which he at- 
tended Dayton Academy, under Professor 
Love, and a select school at Armagh, under 
Prof. D. H. Tomb and Rev. Mr. Wilson. He 
taught his first school at the age of eighteen 
years, in BufSngton township, one of his 



944 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



pvipils being Prof. J. T. Stewart, the scholar 
and historian, who later was Professor Camp- 
bell's assistant in conducting summer nor- 
mal schools, the principal ones being at Ar- 
magh and New Florence ; he taught two terms 
at Hutchinson, twenty terms at Armagh, four 
years at Greenville, and seven at Mechanics- 
burg. Professor Campbell is known through- 
out the counties of Indiana and Westmore- 
land, and has been the instructor of thou- 
sands of young men and women who are to- 
day occupying honorable positions in the 
world of lausiness and social life. In his po- 
litical belief he relies upon his own judgment 
as to M'hich candidates to support, irrespec- 
tive of party connection, and has been elected 
to positions of trust and responsibility in 
his native township. He is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he is 
an elder and Sunday school teacher, having a 
Bible class. Fraternally he is connected with 
the I. 0. 0. F. Lodge (No. 50, at Johnstown), 
the Jr. 0. U. A. M., and the Royal Arcanum. 

In 1877 Professor Campbell was married 
to Sadie Makesell, whose father died during 
the Civil war, and they have the following 
children: Millard, a graduate of Lancaster 
Business College, who has been a school 
teacher for two terms; Mabel, a graduate 
from the same college and now a teacher; 
Amanda, who is studying under her father 
with the idea of becoming an educator; 
Dwight ; Gladys ; Dee, and Marion. 

WILLIAM NELSON LIGGETT has, in a 
comparatively brief period of practice at the 
bar of Indiana county, attained such standing 
as to give promise of unusual achievement 
and usefulness. He is a resident of the bor- 
ough of Indiana, where his energy and popu- 
larity have already led him into vfirious ac- 
tivities lielpful to the community and demon- 
strating his thorough sympathy with all that 
affects the general welfare. Mr. Liggett was 
bom April 29, 1881, at Centerville, in West 
Wheatfield township, this county, son of Rob- 
ert Carr Liggett, and belongs to a family of 
Scottish origin whose first representative in 
Indiana county was his great-grandfather, 
Robert Liggett. 

Robert Liggett was a native of Glasgow, 
Scotland, where he grew to manhood. There 
he married a Miss Carr and they came to 
America, settling in Wheatfield township, In- 
diana Co., Pa., where Mr. Liggett became a 
fanner, owning a tract of 200 acres. He was 
among the first settlers in that section of the 
couutv, and was one of the most respected 



men of his day. He was a member of the 
United Presbyterian Church, to which his wife 
also belonged. Their children were : John ; 
William : Margaret, who married John Ma- 
bon ; and Jane, who married Hugh Best. 

William Liggett, son of Robert, was born 
Jan. 24, 1818, in what is now West Wheat- 
field township, and there grew to manhood. 
He followed farming all his life, owning a 
tract of 125 acres near Centerville, upon 
which he built a brick home and made other 
improvements. He spent the remainder of 
his life there, dying on the farm, and is bur- 
ied in the Bethel Church cemetery. He was 
a member of the U. P. Church, in politics a 
Whig and Republican in turn, and took suffi- 
cient interest in the welfare of his township 
to fill the position of school director. Mr. 
Liggett married Mary Wallace, who was born 
in Wheatfield townsliip. daughter of Samuel 
Wallace, and died Nov. 7, 1882, aged seventy- 
four years, seven months. She, too, is buried 
in Bethel Church cemetery. Fom-teen chil- 
dren were born to this couple: Agnes, who 
died in June, 1871 ; Juliann, who died Dec. 9, 
1865; Samuel, who died June 2. I860: Mary, 
who died Oct. 22, 1880; Josephine, who died 
Feb. 28, 1879; Emma, who married Aiken 
Stivender, and died at Leesburg. I^'la., IMay 
28, 1891; Elizabeth, wife of Seymour Hol- 
lingsworth; Sarah Ellen, who died young: 
Robert Carr; Margaret, married to William 
Alexander, of West Wheatfield township ; Lu- 
cinda, who married Lawson iMcKelvey, and 
resides in Toungstown, Ohio ; William, a 
farmer of West Wheatfield township; John, 
who resides on the homestead; and J. Nelson, 
of Brushvalley township. 

Robert Carr Liggett, son of William, was 
horn on the Liggett farm in what is now 
West Wheatfield township Sept. 5, 1836, and 
had such educational advantages as the neigh- 
boring public schools afforded. He helped 
with the work at home from boyhood, remain- 
ing with his parents until he attained his 
ma.iority. Farm work had been his principal 
occupation, but when he started out for him- 
self it was as a laborer on the work train of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, his 
wages being eight cents an hour. After being 
employed in that capacity for some time he 
became a brakeman, running between Pitts- 
burg and Altoona, and he received $1.35 for 
the trip, which took from twelve to twenty 
hours. He was on the main line for a while, 
until promoted to conductor on work trains, 
liaving forty miles of road under his juris- 
diction. He was thus engaged for twenty- 




^, ;^^.^#- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



945 



nine years, being one of the oldest conductors 
in the employ of the Pennsylvania Company 
at that time. It was during this period that 
the famous Johnstown flood occurred, and his 
name will live in history as one of the heroes 
of that disaster. He took it upon himself to 
run his train as rapidly as possible thi'ough 
the threatened district with whistle screaming, 
warning the people of their danger and urg- 
ing them to flee to the hilltops. Thousands 
of lives were saved through his foresight and 
courage. When the flood was over he worked 
night and day with his train to get the road 
in passable condition again. He retired from 
railroad work in 1890 and settled down to 
farming on a forty-acre tract in West Wheat- 
field township, part of the original Liggett 
homestead, where he has since continued to 
reside. He has erected buildings and made 
other improvements on this tract, having a 
very attractive home. Though past seventy- 
five years of age he is still active in mind and 
body, looking after his own affairs and taking 
a zealous interest in local matters. He has al- 
ways been regarded as a valuable citizen, be- 
ing highly esteemed by all who know him for 
his sterling worth and high character. His 
genial disposition has endeared him to his 
family and a large circle of friends. Though 
a stanch Republican in political sentiment he 
is independent in his support of measures and 
candidates. He has served his township as 
school director. Mr. Liggett is a member of 
the U. P. Church at New Florence, of which 
he is a trustee. 

On March 8, 1871, Mr. Liggett married 
Barbara Wagoner, who was born in Fairfield 
township, Westmoreland county, daughter of 
John and Betsey (Galbreath) Wagoner. She. 
too, is a member of the U. P. Church. Seven 
children have been born to this union, one of 
whom died in infancy, the others being : Sam- 
uel W., born Aug. 11, 1873. married Eliza- 
beth Matthews Keller: Amy G., bom Feb. 2, 
1876, married Robert B. Rogers and resides in 
Conemaugh, Cambria Co., Pa. ; Lottie V., born 
April 20, 1878, was educated in the public 
schools and at summer normal under Prof. 
J. T. Stewart: William Nelson is mentioned 
below : Marv Enuna, born Nov. 27, 1883, died 
in 1887; Joseph R., born Oct. 23, 1886, is en- 
gaged in farming at home. 

William Nelson Liggett was reared on the 
farm in the Conemaugh valley where his 
father still lives. After receiving a good pub- 
lic school education lie taught school in his na- 
tive State for some time. Taking a collegiate 
course in the Ohio Northern University, 



at Ada, Ohio, he was graduated in 1902 with 
the degree of A. B. In 1904 he graduated 
from the McGibeney College of Oratory, Phil- 
adelphia; next took the course in the college 
of law at the Ohio Northern University, re- 
ceiving the degree of LL. B. in 1906; was 
dean of the College of Rhetoric and Public 
Speaking, Ohio Northern University, in 1906 
and 1908 ; received the degree of A. M. from 
the Ohio Northern University in 1908: and 
was admitted to the bar in Ohio that year. 
In 1909 he was admitted to the bar in Penn- 
sylvania, and has since been enaged in practice 
in the borough of Indiana. Mr. Liggett was a 
zealous and conscientious student throughout 
his preparatoi-y years, and his devotion to Ins 
work and high abilities augur a useful and 
successful career for him in his chosen line. 
He has the respect and good will of all who 
know him, and his friends feel that he is des- 
tined to take a leading part in matters af- 
fecting the public good in his own iocality 
and perhaps in wider fields. He is a staunch 
Republican and has advanced ideas concern- 
ing honorable and public-spirited citizenship 
as shown in the clean administration of gov- 
ernment and disinterested partisanship in 
politics. He fights his battles in the open, and 
is opposed to any compromise with the enemies 
of right, and his broad-minded views and keen 
intellect make him a powerful champion of 
any cause. He has already established him- 
self as a criminal lawyer and an exponent of 
patriotic citizenship and clean manhood from 
the public platform. 

In 1904 Mr. Liggett married Emma Pearl 
Mack, who was born Nov. 12, 1879, daughter 
of Robert G. Mack, of Indiana county, and 
they have two children, Beulah and Robert. 
Mr. Liggett is a member of the United Pres- 
byterian Church of Indiana and takes an ac- 
tive interest in the church and Sabbath school 
work. 

JAMES DEVLIN DeVINNEY has a large 
farm in Conemaugh township, Indiana coun- 
ty, where he is engaged in general agricul- 
tural pursuits and stock raising; he makes 
and sells large quantities of butter. Mr. 
DeVinney was born in Armstrong township, 
Indiana Co., Pa., Oct. 26, 1862, son of James 
DeVinney. 

Daniel DeVinney, his paternal grandfather, 
was born at Connor, County Antrim, Ireland, 
Jan. 1, 1803, son of Walter and Margaret 
(Cawfield) DeVinney. He was a Mason and 
an Oransreman. holding fast to his faith until 
the time of his death, Oct. 27, 1883. Mary 



946 



IIISTOEY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Moutgonien*. who became liis wife March 2, 
1823, was born at Connor, Jan. 8, 1803. On 
Oct. 28, 1890, she peacefully passed away on 
the old homestead, and her remains were laid 
to rest in St. John's Lutheran cemetery, in 
Armstrong count.v, midway between Atwood 
and Plumville. She was a daughter of James 
and Elizabeth (Kid) ^Montgomery, and niece 
of Gen. John ^lontgomery, who was born in 
County Antrim. Ireland, in 1759. coming to 
America in 1774, and enlisting in the Ameri- 
can army in 1776, at which time he was ap- 
pointed on Wa-shington 's staff, with which 
he served until the close of the great war 
for independence. He died at Lewisville, 
Indiana Co., Pa., Nov. 11, 1840, where his 
remains repose. Daniel and Mary DeVinney, 
with three children, came to America in 1832, 
coming on to Conemaugh in 1833, and later 
settling on a 400-acre tract of land near At- 
wood, Armstrong Co., Pa., a part of which 
is still the old homestead. Besides James, 
the eldest cliild, there were born to them in 
Ireland, two children: Marv. born April 21, 
1830, married July 11, 1850, William Mc- 
Laughlin, who was killed in one of the early 
battles of the Civil war, and his widow still 
resides in their old home near Atwood, Pa. ; 
Ann S., born Aug. 18, 1832, died at the home 
of her brother. William C. DeVinney (with 
whom she had resided from the time her 
parents died), corner of Rosedale and Sus- 
quehanna streets, Pittsburg, Pa., Nov. 5. 1912, 
and was laid to rest in Woodlawn cemetery, 
Wilkinsburg, Pa. The following children 
were born to Daniel and ]\Iary DeVinney in 
this country: (1) John, born March 22, 
1835, at Atwood, Armstrong Co., Pa., died 
unmarried Oct. 13, 1866, and was buried in 
St. John's Lutheran cemeterv. (2) William 
C., born Aug. 12, 1837, at Atwood, Pa., en- 
listed from Indiana, Pa., in Company E, 
148th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, 
Aug. 16, 1862, and served with the Army of 
the Potomac in General Hancock's Corps 
(the 2d), under Col. James A. Beaver, stay- 
ing with that great army until it was mus- 
tered out at the close of the war. He was 
promoted to quartermaster sergeant. He 
taught in the public schools of the State 
thirty-five years. On Aug. 29. 1866. he mar- 
ried Miss Bell, youngest daughter of John 
and :\raria Kelly," of Willet, Indiana Co., Pa. 
To this union were born: April 13, 1867, 
John K. DeVinney; Oct. 3, 1876, Daniel B. 
DeVinney; Dee. 7, 1877, James S. DeVinnev. 
On Feb. 9, 1876. John K. died, and was 
buried in St. John's Lutheran cemetery. Dan- 



iel and James attended the public schools, and 
later entered the Indiana (Pa.) high school, 
from which they graduated in 1896. James 
entei-ing the Pennsylvania State noridal school 
at Indiana, Pa., where he graduated in the 
commercial course in 1897, Coming to Pitts- 
burg he entered upon his pi-ofessional career 
with the Westinghouse Electric and Manufac- 
turing Company. The following year Daniel 
and his parents located in Pittsburg. Daniel 
taking up machinist work and mechanical en- 
gineering. But these two brilliantly opening 
careers were cut short bv the death of James 
S., Feb. 14, 1899, and Daniel B.. Sept. 6. 1902. 
Both were removed from their home in Pitts- 
burg and buried in St. John 's Lutheran ceme- 
terj-, near their old home, Atwood, Pa. Dur- 
ing their stay in Indiana at school, their Aunt 
Ann kept house for them, she coming with 
Daniel and his parents to Pittsburg and mak- 
ing her home with them until the time of her 
death, Nov. 5, 1912. (3) :\Iartha. born Sept. 
21. 1839. on March 3, 1864, became the wife 
of Joseph Lukehart, of Plumville. Indiana 
Co,, Pa. :\Ir. Lukehart was born Feb. 3, 1827, 
and died April 16, 1907. and was buried in 
St. John's Lutheran cemetery. His widow 
lives at Smicksburg. Indiana Co.. Pa. (4) 
Elizabeth, born at Atwood. Pa., Oct. 3. 1842, 
married in October. 1871. John P. Lukehart, 
of Plumville. Indiana Co.. Pa. For some years 
they made their home at Vandergrift. Pa., 
where she died in February, 1905. She was 
buried in St. John's Lutheran cemetery. 

James DeVinney, father of James D. De- 
Vinney, was the eldest child of Daniel and 
Mary DeVinney, and was born at Connor, 
County Antrim^ Ireland, Sept. 1. 1827. Com- 
ing to America with his parents at the age of 
five years, he assisted them on the farm as 
he grew from boyhood into young manhood, 
until Feb. 27, 1855, when he married Re- 
becca McCausland. of Atwood. Soon after- 
ward he bought a farm near by and engaged 
in farming for himself. To this union was 
born, Feb. 23. 1857. William M. DeVinney, 
who was left an orphan by the death of his 
mother March 15th of the same year. His 
grandparents. Daniel and ^lary DeVinney. 
took charge of him and nurtured him throiigh 
to boyhood and young manhood, and their 
home was his home until they died. From 
that time until his marriage he livetl with 
his uncle. William C. DeVinney, and his aunt 
Bell, and his aunt Ann. He was sent to 
the public schools, and later to Glade Run 
Academy, after which he entered the profes- 
sion of teaching. Later he studied at the 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



947 



Pennsylvania State normal school at Indiana, 
Pa., from which he graduated in the famous 
class of '"89," his aunt Ann keeping house 
for him during his three years' stay in Indi- 
ana. In 1890 he married Jennie E. Winters, 
of Edinboro, Erie Co., Pa., a graduate of 
the Northwestern Conservatory of Music. 
Through his further school work she ably as- 
sisted him by superintending the musical de- 
partments of the special summer normal in- 
stitutes he conducted the following seasons. 
After having spent fifteen years in the pro- 
fession of teaching he abandoned his work as 
teacher and principal and they moved to 
Pittsburg, where he became assistant to 
County Superintendent Samuel Hamilton, of 
the Allegheny county public schools, which 
position he finally resigned to enter business, 
which he has since pursued. Mr. William M. 
DeVinney was brought up in the Presby- 
terian Church, and as to his political affilia- 
tions he is an untiring worker in the cause of 
Prohibition, and is ever active in the councils 
of his party. He is a member of the Alle- 
gheny County Prohibition executive com- 
mittee, and was elected a delegate to the Pro- 
hibition State convention which met at Phil- 
adelphia July 9, 1912, and also to the Pro- 
hibition National convention which convened 
at Atlantic City, July 10-13, 1912. His wife 
is a strong advocate of this great cause and 
a faithful W. C. T. U. worker, and is ready, 
when women are given their rights in this 
great Keystone State, to place her ballot 
squarely against the great blighting evil, in- 
temperance. They live at No. 5618 Broad 
street, Pittsburg. 

In 1859 James DeVinney married as his 
second wife Margaret Devlin, who was born 
in 1826 in Armstrong township, Indiana 
county, daughter of James and Ann (Ram- 
sey) Devlin, of that township, and died Aug. 
22, 1907, at the home of her son James; she 
was buried in the West Union cemetery. She 
was the mother of six children: Harvey, 
.born March 17, 1860, married Rose Halstead 
and now resides in Haskell county, Kans. ; 
John, born July 29, 1861, died when twelve 
years old ; James Devlin is mentioned below ; 
Harriet, bom April 1, 1864, unmarried, lives 
at Fort Collins, Colo.; Taylor, born Dec. 1, 
1866, married Ella McDowell, and lives at 
Reno, Kans., where he is engaged in the 
threshing business and is a lumber dealer; 
George Calvin married Martha J. George, 
daughter of James and Elizabeth (Hamilton) 
George, and resides on the homeste.ad in 
Armstrong township. 



In 1862 James DeVinney enlisted in Com- 
pany E, 148th Regiment, Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteers, from Atwood, Armstrong Co., Pa., 
being mustered into the service from Indiana, 
Pa. After the close of the war he moved to 
Armstrong township, Indiana county, where 
he remained until the time of his death, Aug. 
19, 1904. He bought a tract of 117 acres 
there from the Samuel Wiggins heirs, all of 
which was in timber at the time of purchase, 
and he spent the remainder of his life there, 
clearing his land, selling timber and follow- 
ing farming. He is buried in the West Union 
cemetery. 

James Devlin DeVinney attended common 
school in Armstrong township and began 
work as his father's assistant, continuing to 
help his parents until 1888, when he married. 
He was then engaged on Samuel Robinson's 
farm in Armstrong township for a year, 
"cropping," and for the next few years 
"cropped" the Sampson Pershing farm in 
Armstrong township. That place, which con- 
tained 106 acres, was willed him by his father, 
and he lived there and cultivated the land 
until 1905, in which year he sold it to the 
Saxton Coal Company and moved to Cone- 
maugh township, where he purchased the 
Daniel Hawks farm of 217 acres, on which he 
has since had his home. In addition to gen- 
eral farming and stock raising he is interested 
in dairying, producing butter only, and ship- 
ping it to Livermore. In 1907 he built a 
fine large barn, and he is constantly making 
changes on his place to improve the property 
or facilitate the work, which he conducts along 
up-to-date lines. His farm is under excellent 
cultivation, and everything about the prop- 
erty indicates intelligent care. 

On May 10. 1888, Mr. DeVinney married 
Margaret" Robinson, daughter of Samuel and 
Isabelle (Cunningham) Robinson, of Arm- 
strong township, Indiana county, and they 
have had a family of six children, bom as 
follows : Elsie Mav, May 9, 1889 ; Nettie Bell, 
March 6, 1891; Elder Paul, Nov. 13, 1892; 
Mary Margaret, Aug. 26. 1895 ; Bertha Viola, 
Sept. 23, 1898 ; Edna Blanch, Dec. 26, 1901. 
All of the family belong to the Ebenezer Pres- 
byterian Church, and take an active part in 
the church and Sabbath school work. Mrs. 
DeVinney is superintendent of the Home de- 
partment, and their oldest three daughters 
have been secretary and treasurer of the Sab- 
bath school. The other two have been present 
at every session the last year. 

George Calvin DeVinney, youngest 
brother of James D. DeVinney, was born 



948 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Aug. 22, 1868, ou the homestead farm in Arm- 
strong township and there passed his early- 
life, attending public school. When a young 
man he went west to Dickinson county, Kans., 
where he worked on a farm for two years, at 
the end of that time returning home and re- 
suming work with his parents, conducting 
the farm for his father until the latter 's 
death. He now owns the old place, having 
117 acres which he keeps in fine condition, 
following general farming and dairying; he 
makes considerable butter, which he ships to 
Indiana borough. He is decidedly enteip ris- 
ing and progressive, and has become one of 
the prominent agriculturists of his section 
of the county. He has always taken a deep 
interest and active part in the public affairs 
of the locality, and has served three years 
as member of the board of school directors ; he 
has been active on the election board for sev- 
eral years. In political opinion he is a Re- 
publican. He is a member of the Presbyter- 
ian Church. Mr. DeVinney. is a wide-awake, 
public-spirited citizen, one whose activity in 
the affairs of the community has been for the 
general good, and actuated by a real desire 
to serve his fellow men as much as possible. 

Mr. DeVinney has two children : Ina Mar- 
garet, bom Oct. 6, 1898. and James Murray, 
born Sept. 29, 1905. 

HARRY E. MAHAN, though scarcely in 
his prime at the time of his death, Nov. 20, 
1900, was one of the most esteemed resi- 
dents of his district. As a progressive farmer 
and stock raiser, a man active in public af- 
fairs and interested in advancing the welfare 
of the community, he had made an enviable 
reputation, and he left an honored name. Mr. 
]\Iahan was bora May 22, 1862, in Washing- 
ton township, Indiana county, on the farm 
now managed by his two sons. ' 

This Mahan family came originally from 
Ireland, where Patrick Mahan, grandfather of 
Harry E. Mahan, was ])orn. He came to 
America with his father, John Malian. and 
settled on a tract of 225 acres in Washington 
township, Indiana Co., Pa., building a log 
cabin within a few rods of the site of the 
handsome modern residence now on that place. 
He cleared the land and improved it greatly 
during his long life, dying June 30, 1871. at 
the age of eighty-seven years. He was a Se- 
ceder, and .ioined the Presbyterian Church in 
liis neighborlinnd. In politics he was an aboli- 
lionist. ami R('|)ublicfin. We have the fol- 
lowing record of his children: Rebecca died 
Sept. 16, 1876, aged sixty-three years: I\Iary, 



born April 23, 1816, maiTied George Trim- 
ble, and died Sept. 5, 1893; JIargaret died 
Dec. 21, 1847, aged twentv-nine vears; Mar- 
tha, born Sept. 28. 1829, married William 
Roug, and died Feb. 9, 1912; Jennie, born 
Feb. 21, 1831. died April 7, 1906 : Elizabeth, 
born March 23, 1833, married James Dickson, 
who died Aug. 1, 1891, aged sixty-seven years, 
two days, and I\Irs. Dickson now makes her 
home on the ]\Iahan farm in Washington town- 
ship which William H. and James C. Mahan, 
sons of Harry E. Mahan. conduct (she had 
no children bj' Mr. Dickson, but he had two 
by a previous marriage, to Eliza Jane Rob- 
inson, John, now deceased, and Elizabeth, 
Mrs. Warner, of Saltsburg) ; Nancy Ann, 
born in 1835, is Mrs. Andrew Duncan ; David 
E., born Feb. 2, 1837, was a well-known school 
teacher, having taught for forty terms ; Eben- 
ezer, born Dec. 8, 1838, entered the Union 
army during the Civil war and was killed 
May 27, 1864, while taking part in Sherman's 
march to the sea. 

Harry E. Mahan was educated in the com- 
mon schools and at the Indiana State normal 
school. During his young manhood he taught 
four or five terms of school in Washington 
township, and was married .iust before the 
beginning of his last term. Then he settled 
on the farm where he resided the rest of his 
life and which is now owned by his heirs. It 
consists of 125 acres in Washington township, 
upon which he made extensive improvements, 
bringing the property into most jirofitable 
shape. In addition to general farming he 
made a specialty of stock raising, breeding 
registered Percheron liorses. Jersey cattle, 
Shropshire sheep and Berkshire hogs. 

Mr. Mahan was a most enterprising man, 
and took a public-spirited interest in the good 
of the communit.v, encouraging the various 
movements for the general welfai'e which 
seemed to him to promise good results. Orig- 
inally a Republican in politics, he later be- 
came a prominent member of the Prohibition 
party, of which he was county chairman. He 
served his township as auditor. In church 
connection he was a United Presbyterian, and 
he was a teacher in the Sunday school. 

On Feb. 11, 1886, Mr, Mahan married Ida 
R. Lydic, who was born Oct. 29, 1862. in 
Washington township, daughter of William 
II, Lvdic, and thev had two sons: William 
H., born Sept, 19, 1887, and James C. born 
Jan. 16, 1890. 

William II. M.mian obtained his early edu- 
cation in the common schools and later at- 
tended the State Normal school at Indiana, 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



949 



Grove City College and Muskingum College. 
He taught four terms of school in Indiana, 
meantime, in partnership with his brother, 
also engaging in the farm work on the place 
lately owned by their father. The brothers 
continue to work along the lines laid down 
by their father, looking after their agricul- 
tural work in the most approved modern fash- 
ion and raising registered stock which has 
quite a reputation in the neighborhood. 

James C. ILihan received his literary edu- 
cation in the local common schools, Indiana 
State normal school and Grove City College, 
and is now preparing for the medical pro- 
fession, having only one more year of study 
before him to complete his course. ]\Iean- 
time he has also engaged in teaching in In- 
diana county and W. H. Mahan, his brother, is 
looking after the fine family estate. 

JOHN D. SNYDER, a leading agriculturist 
and one of the largest land owners of Brush- 
valley township, Indiana county, belongs to 
an old New Jersey family of Holland extrac- 
tion which has been settled in this county 
since the middle of the last century. He was 
born Aug. 2, 1847, at Newton, Sussex Co., 
N. J., son of George B. Snyder and grandson 
of William Snyder. The Snyders have be- 
come connected by marriage with many of 
the old families of New Jersey. 

William Snyder, the grandfather, was a 
native of Warren county, N. J., where he 
was a land owner and farmer. He moved to 
Sussex county, N. J., and there continued 
farming until 1853, when he came out to 
Pennsylvania, locating first in Burrell town- 
ship, Indiana county, where he engaged in 
farming. Later he owned land upon which 
he lived and farmed in White township, but 
returned to Burrell township, where the rest 
of his life was spent, and where he died Dec. 
3, 1884. He was buried in Oakland cemetery, 
at Indiana. His wife Elizabeth (Quick), 
whom he had married in his native county, 
died in Burrell township some years before 
him, and is buried in the same cemetery. 
They had two children, George B. and Sally 
Ann, the latter marrying William Ackerson 
and dying in young womanhood. 

George B. Snyder was born in 1827 in War- 
ren county, N. J., removed with his parents to 
Sussex county, that State, and there followed 
farming near Newton. He married Hannah 
Ackerson, and in 1853, in company with his 
parents, his wife and theiir three children 



came to western Pennsylvania. Their first 
home in this region was in White township, 
Indiana county, and later they lived in Bur- 
rell township, near his father, spending but 
a short time there, however. Moving to Brush- 
valley township, Mr. Snyder bought a tract 
of 240 acres known as the Joseph Stewart 
farm which he continued to cultivate and 
nnprove during the remainder of his life 
dying there Aug. 8, 1905. His wife also died 
on the farm, in September, 1895, and they 
are buried in Oakland cemetery, at Indiana. 
Mr. Snyder was a Democrat, but took no part 
in polities and never aspired to ofiice. His 
three children were: AVilliam, who died at 
Latrobe, Westmoreland county ; John D. ; and 
Emma, who married Luther B. McDonald and 
resides in Brushvalley township. 

John D. Snyder was a boy when the fam- 
ily removed from New Jersey, and he re- 
ceived his education in Brushvalley township, 
attending public school. Prom an early age 
he has done farm work, which he has always 
followed, and in Avhich he has been highly 
successful as the result of hard work and 
thrifty management. His energetic and pro- 
gressive disposition is shown in the condition 
and appearance of his various tracts, all of 
which have been gi-eatly improved during his 
ownership. His holdings now comprise about 
four hundred acres in Brushvalley township, 
all furnished with substantial houses and 
barns, and well looked after in every respect, 
no detail being considered too trivial to merit 
attention. As a man he is honorable in all 
his dealings, liberal and broad-minded in his 
outlook on life, and has the good will of all 
who come in contact with him. 

In 1870 Mr. Snyder married Margaret Stev- 
ens, a native of Brashvalley township, bom 
May 16, 1851, daughter of David and Cath- 
erine (Winkelman) Stevens, and ten children 
have been born to them : William L., who 
is a farmer of Brushvalley township ; Emma, 
wife of Robert Shearer, of Buffington town- 
ship ; Alice J., wife of Daniel Barkley ; John 
P., a farmer of Brushvalley township; Eliza- 
beth, widow of Clark Barkley, living at home : 
Charles B., at home; Clark, who died young; 
George Cleveland, at home ; Lillian, who mar- 
ried Andrew Mickesel and (second) Russell 
Campbell ; and Hannah A., at home. The 
family are members of the M. E. Church. In 
politics ]\Ir. Snyder is a Democrat of the old 
school, takes an active interest in public mat- 
ters, and is independent about supporting 



950 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



whatever men and measures he deems most 
likely to contribute to the general welfare. 

WILLIAM F. WEITZEL, M. D., general 
medical practitioner of Indiana, Indiana coun- 
ty, was born in Banks township, this county, 
Dec. 18, 1877, son of Frederick and Elizabeth 
(Coy) Weitzel. His grandfather was a 
farmer, and his father also followed farming 
in early life, and later engaged in business 
in the furniture and undertaking line. The 
Docter is one of a family of eight children, 
the others being: Joseph C. ; Luther M.; 
Laura B., wife of Robert Y. Smith; Dolly, 
wife of Thomas P. Brickell; Bertha C, wife 
of Dr. Harry H. Fairbanks ; George, who died 
aged twenty-one years ; and John, who died in 
infancy. 

"William F. Weitzel attended public school 
in his native township. After studying medi- 
cine for some time he entered the Baltimore 
Medical College, at Baltimore, Md., from 
which institution he was graduated in the 
spring of 1903, beginning practice on his own 
account that year at Gipsy, Indiana Co., Pa. 
There he was located until 1911, when he took 
a post-graduate couree at the Philadelphia 
Polyclinic, a special course on the eye, ear, nose 
and throat. Upon its completion he opened 
an office in the borough of Indiana, where he 
has since been engaged in general practice. 
He has acquired a large patronage, and was 
also for some time medical examiner for the 
New York Life, Prudential Life, and Equit- 
able Life Insurance Companies. He is a mem- 
ber of the Indiana County Medical Society, of 
the Pennsylvania State Medical Society, and 
of the American Medical Association, and fra- 
ternally holds membership in the I. 0. 0. F. 
and Patriotic Order Sons of America. He 
belongs to the Christian Church. Dr. Weit- 
zel's high professional standing has been 
gained by conscientious devotion to the inter- 
ests of his patients, and his public-spirited 
disposition and intelligent interest in the gen- 
eral welfare have won the respect of all who 
know him. 

On June 5, 1906, Dr. Weitzel married x\r- 
veda Gourley, daughter of Gaskel A. Gour- 
ley, of Jefferson county, Pennsylvania. 

EDWARD BRADY WAKEFIELD, gen- 
eral superintendent of the J. G. McCrory es- 
tate in Brushvalley township, Indiana county, 
was bom there May 20, 1872, and is a descend- 
ant of a family of Irish extraction which has 
been associated with the history of this sec- 



tion for over one hundred and twenty-five 
years. 

David Wakefield, who founded the family 
here, was born in Ireland and there married 
Mary Houge. They came to America about 
1775, and in 1785 settled with their family 
in what was then Wheatfield township, now 
in Indiana county but then part of West- 
moreland county. The place where they 
made their home is now included in West 
Wheatfield township. Their property was 
then in the woods, and the rest of their lives 
was spent in its improvement and cultivation. 

Jeremiah Wakefield, son of David, was the 
grandfather of Edward B. Wakefield. He 
made his home in Brushvalley township, on 
a tract now included in the large estate there 
owned by J. G. MeCrory, of 'Neyf York, and 
there remained to the end of his days. To 
him and his wife Mary (Wakefield) Wakefield 
were born six children : Isaac N., who became 
a farmer in Allegheny county. Pa. ; John F. ; 
Elizabeth, who married George Grumbling; 
Caroline, who married Zaehariah Olierdorff 
and is deceased ; Margaret, now the widow of 
Thomas Wakefield ; and David C. who mar- 
ried Blanche Smith and resides at McKees- 
port, Pennsylvania. 

John F. Wakefield, son of Jeremiah, was 
born July 31, 1836, on the farm in Brushval- 
ley township, and there attended public 
school. In his youth and earl.y manhood he 
worked at farming and stock raising on the 
home place with his father, being thus engaged 
until his marriage, when he removed to his 
present place near Greenville, in Cherryhill 
township. During the Civil war he served 
oVer two years in the Union army, enlisting in 
February, 1863, in Company E, 11th Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry, and receiving his 
discharge in May, 1865. He was wounded 
in the battle of the Wilderness. IMr. Wake- 
field is a substantial and respected citizen of 
his community, a member of tlie ^1. E. Church 
at Greenville, Cherryhill township, and a man 
who has been faithful to all his responsibili- 
ties. In 1868 he married Elizabeth Brady, of 
Westmoreland county, who died in 1875, the 
mother of three children, namely: Edward 
Brady and Harry PL. twins; and Grant W.. 
who lives at home. Mr. Wakefield's second 
marriage was to Martha Fetterman. of Brush- 
valley township, who died in 1904. There 
was one child by this union. Ida, who lives 
with her father. 

Being only three years old when his mother 
died, Edward Brady Wakefield went to live 
at the home of his gi-andfathor, Jeremiah 



HISTOEY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Wakefield, on whose farm he grew to man- 
hood. He attended the local public school. 
Kemaining at that place until his grandfather 
died, he then, at the age of twenty, went to 
Pittsburg, where he found employment with 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, continu- 
ing with same for nine years, during which 
time he worked his way up from the position 
of fireman to that of locomotive engineer. 
After giving up railroading he worked in the 
store of J. G. McCrory for a period, and then 
started in business for himself at Young 
Wood, Westmoreland county, where he was 
engaged as a merchant for two years. Selling 
out in 1906 he became superintendent of the 
large estate of J. G. McCrory in Brushvalley 
township, Indiana county, which comprises 
fourteen hundred acres and includes some 
of the oldest settled tracts in the township. 
Mr. McCrory has spared no expense in the 
improvement of these farms, putting up mod- 
ern dwelling' houses, barns and other build- 
ings, the construction of which has been car- 
ried on under Mr. Wakefield's supervision. 
He also has entire charge of the farming, 
stock, etc., and has had ample opportunity to 
demonstrate his ability and executive qualities 
in the administration of this immense prop- 
erty. His trustworthiness no less than his 
qualifications as an agriculturist have been 
displayed in his management and adjustment 
of the numerous problems which arise in the 
conduct of so extensive an estate, and that 
his services have been eminently satisfactory 
is evidenced by the long continued confidence 
h'3 has enjoyed. 

On Jan. "l, 1900, Mr. Wakefield married 
Nannie E. Mack, who was born in Brushvalley 
township, daughter of the late John Mack, a 
well-known resident of that township. Pour 
children have been born to this marriage: 
Violet, Helen, Lillie and IMack. 

Mr. Wakefield is a member of the Firemen's 
and Engineer' Association. In political con- 
nection he is a stanch member of the Repub- 
lican party. 

GiLLis Mcpherson doty, who is now' 

living retired at Blacklick, Indiana county, is 
a descendant of one of the oldest and best- 
known families of New England. 

The name was foimierly spelled Dotey, 
Doty, Dote and Dot en. (j) Edward Doten 
or Doty, a native of England, was a youth 
when he came to America with the little band 
of Pilgrims which crossed the Atlantic in the 
"Mayflower" in 1620, landing on Plymouth 
Rock, in what is now the harbor of Plymouth, 



Mass. He was in the service of Stephen Hop- 
kins, and he was one of the signers of the 
solemn compact made in Cape Cod harbor 
N ov. 11, 1620, on board the ' ' Mayflower. ' ' He 
married Jan. 6, 1634-35, Paith Clarke, bom 
m 1619, daughter of Thurston and Paith 
Clarke. In 16.52 Mr. Doty was one of the 
purchasers of Dartmouth, Mass., but later 
removed to Cape Cod, locating in the town of 
larmouth, where he spent the remainder of 
his life. He died there Aug. 23, 1655. His 
widow married (second) John Phillips, of 
Duxbury. Children: Edward, John, 
Ihomas, Samuel, Desire, Elizabeth, Isaac, 
Joseph and Mary. 

(II) Samuel Doty, son of Edward and 
Paith (Clarke) Doty, born in Plymouth, in 
1643, became quite prominent in the affairs 
of Plymouth and Cape Cod. Later he re- 
moved to New Jersey, locating at Piscataway, 
Middl_esex county, where he was well known. 
In 1675 he was commissioned lieutenant of the 
military company of New Piscataway, of 
which Prancis Drake was captain ; this -com- 
mission was received in 1678. He became a 
member of the Seventh Day Baptist Church, 
which was formed in 1700. He died about 
October, 1715. In Piscataway, N. J., he mar- 
ried Jeane Harman, of that town. 

(III) Jonathan Doty, son of Samuel and 
Jeane (Harman) Doty, was bom in Piscata- 
way, N. J., Feb. 24, 1687-88. About 1717 he 
married Mary, and they became the parents 
of eight children: William, born Sept. 11, 
1719; Jonathan, born about 1724; Daniel,' 
born about 1727; Joshua, born about 1730; 
Joseph, born about 1735; Mary; Jane, who 
married Oct. 21. 1747, John Johnson; and 
Elizabeth. 

(IV) Jonathan Doty (2), son of Jonathan 
and Mary Doty, born about 1724, in Piscata- 
way, N. J., removed with his parents to Bask- 
ing Ridge, N. J., where he was a famier and 
where he died. He married Patience Sutton, 
and their children were: Jonathan, born 
about 1754 ; Zebulon, born about 1758 ; Nath- 
aniel, born Oct. 19, 1761 ; Joseph, born Aug 
31, 1764; William, born Oct. 8, 1767; and 
Rebecca, who married and settled in Pennsyl- 
vania. 

(V) Jonathan Doty (3), son of Jonathan 
(2) and Patience (Sutton) Doty, bom at 
Basking Ridge, N. J., about 1754, there grew 
to manhood. It is supposed he served in the 
Revolutionary war as teamster, in Capt. Asa- 
hel Hinman's Team Brigade of New Jersey, 
as a Jonathan Doty was on the list of team- 
sters ; it must have been this Jonathan or his 



952 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



father. Mr. Doty about 17S4, at the close of 
the Revolution, came West with his wife and 
children, locating in Derry township, AVest- 
moreland Co., Pa., where he farmed and also 
kept a tavern. He met with fair success, and 
was a man well known and respected there in 
his day. Subsequently he removed to Blairs- 
ville, Indiana county, where he spent the re- 
mainder of his life, dying at the ripe age of 
.ninety-six years, in 1850. He was a member 
of the M. E. Church, in which he was quite 
active, being a local preacher and exhorter of 
that denomination. His first wife. Abigail 
(McPherson), died at Blairsville, Pa., about 
1815. and he married (second") :Mrs. Nancy 
(Simpson) Dixon, widow of Samuel Dixon. 
His children, all born to the first marriage, 
were : Jonathan, born about 1780 ; John, 
born about 1783 ; Robert, born in Derry town- 
ship, Westmoreland county, about 1785; Bet- 
sey, born about 1787; Nathaniel, born about 
1789 ; and Gillis, born about 1790. 

(Vl) Gillis Doty, son of Jonathan (3) and 
Abigail (McPherson) Doty, born in Derry 
township, Westmoreland Co.. Pa., there grew 
to manhood and there followed farming until 
his marriage. At that time he settled in 
Blacklick township, Indiana county, on a farm 
of 200 acres on which stood a log cabin. He 
worked hard to clear the land, and later, as 
prosperity enabled him, built a fine stone 
house and made other improvements on the 
place. He continued to engage in stock rais- 
ing and general farming, and lived to a ripe 
old age, dying on the fai-m Dec. 21, 1870. lie 
was buried at Blairsville. J\Ir. Doty was one 
of the best-known men in his section, honor- 
able, intelligent and not only successful in 
his own affairs, but deeply interested in the 
good of his township and its people; he was 
a strong believer in free education. In 1817 
he married Jean Dixon, who was born :\Iay 
16, 1798, daughter of Samuel and Nancy 
(Simpson) Dixon, and died on the homestead 
Aug. 3, 1884. She was buried in Blairsville 
cemetery. Eleven children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Doty: Abbie, born Jan. 29, 1818, 
married Samuel Douglas Aug. 18, 1836; 
Nancv, born March 26. 1820, married Henry 
B. Harrald July 29, 1841; Samuel, born 
April 6. 1822, died on the homestead; Jona- 
than, born Nov. 5, 1824, died Aug. 16, 1872. 
at Newcastle, Pa.; Mary, born Jan. 5, 1827. 
married Dr. James Hansen Bell, and died 
April 18. 1906: Robert, born Jan. 4. 1829, 
died Oct. 30, 1832; Elizabeth, born Nov. 9, 
1831. is the widow of Joseph H. Campbell, 
Ph. D.. and resides in New York City; 'Slav- 
garot Jane, born :Mav 13. 1834. died Fob. 26. 



1908, on the homestead; Rebecca C, horn 
Dec. 15, 1836, married James Falls and died 
April 20, 1906; Sarah Ann. born March 2, 
1839, married Jan. 1, 1862, Hugh Flynn, who 
died July 6, 1878, and she resides at New- 
castle, Pa. ; Gillis McPherson was born July 
8, 1843. 

(VII) Gillis ilcPherson Doty, j'oungest son 
of Gillis and Jean (Dixon) Doty, was born 
on the homestead in Blacklick, where he was 
educated in the public schools of the town- 
ship. Remaining on the homestead with his 
mother and sister ]\Iargaret J., he made farm- 
ing and stock raising his business, and contin- 
ued to follow those lines during his active life. 
In 1910 he had to give up business on account 
of his health, and he located in the village of 
Blacklick. where he is now living retired. He 
still retains the ownership of the homestead 
farm. Mr. Doty is well known all over In- 
diana county. He is a man of genial manner, 
and has hosts of friends with whom he is 
popular. He is a member of F. & A. M. Lodge 
No. 313, of Indiana, which he joined in 1864, 
at the age of twenty-one years, and also be- 
longs to the B. P. 0. Elks. He has always 
been a Republican, and is at present keenly 
interested in the Progressive movement headed 
by Colonel Roosevelt. 

Mr. Doty was married Nov. 21, 1910, to 
Grace M. Lea, born at Pittsburg, daughter of 
John Lea and granddaughter of Richard Lea, 
who for sixty years was a minister of the 
Presbyterian Church at Pittsburg. No chil- 
dren have been born to this union. 

SAMUEL GAILEY. a highly respected re- 
tired citizen of Indiana county, who has the 
distinction of being the oldest man in Cone- 
maugh township, has been a lifelong resident 
of that township, where he was born. March 
5, 1829, son of Andrew and Jean (Barr") 
Gailey. 

James Gailey, the paternal grandfather of 
Samuel Gailey. was born in Ireland and came 
to the United States in young manhood, set- 
tling in what is now known as ITniontown. 
Pa., where he was engaged in the cattle busi- 
ness. For some years he drove cattle to Bal- 
timore, Md.. but later moved to Conemaugh 
and settled on 333 1-3 acres of land, the deed 
for which, sisrned bv King Georqro TIT.. July 
18. 1776. William Penn and William Penn. 
Jr.. is now in the possession of Samuel Gailey. 
j\Tr. Gailey was married in 1787 to Letitia 
Smith, who died Jan. 10. 1845. and he passed 
away June 28. 1838. both beine buried at 
Clarksburg cemetery, in Conemaugh township. 
]\Ir. Gailev's first residence was n small log 



HISTORY OF. INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



95a 



cabin in the wilderness, but at the time of his 
death he was the owner of a comfortable home 
and had more than one-half of his land cleared 
and in a state of cultivation. A sturdy and 
robust man, he had great powers of endurance, 
■ and on one occasion walked from his farm to 
Pittsburg and back in one day, a distance of 
seventy miles. He and his wife had the fol- 
lowing children, all born in the United States : 
Mary, born Nov. 27, 1788; Andrew, Dec. 19, 
1789; Samuel, Nov. 18, 1791; James, Oct. 
12, 1794 (who was a blacksmith) ; Cornelius, 
June 9, 1797 (who was twice married and 
made his home in Cherryhill township, In- 
diana county) ; Thomas, Nov. 5, 1799 (mar- 
ried Elizabeth Brown) ; and Ann, .Aug. 18, 
1802 (died unmarried). 

Andrew Gailey, son of James Gailey, and 
father of Samuel Gailey, was born Dee. 19, 
1789, near Uniontown (then known as Bea- 
sontown). Pa., and as a lad removed with 
his parents to what is now Conemaugh town- 
ship. He did his share in the clearing and 
cultivating of the wilderness farm, as a re- 
ward for which he was given a tract of land 
by his father and also purchased more land 
from him, his subsequent life being spent 
there in farming and cattle raising. His 
death occurred June 6, 1868. He became one 
of the prominent stock raisers of his town- 
ship, and was also well known in public life, 
satisfactorily filling a number of local offices. 
With his family he attended the United Pres- 
byterian Church. On Dec. 23, 1823, Mr. 
Gailey was married to Jean Barr, who was 
born Dec. 3, 1791, daughter of Samuel Barr, 
and they had the following children: Ann, 
born Nov. 9, 1824, died unmarried in 1853 ; 
James Wilson, born Oct. 20, 1825, married 
Eliza Walp, and is now a retired carpenter, 
of McKeesport. Pa. ; Letitia, born April 12, 
1827, married William Momeyer ; Samuel was 
born March 5, 1829 ; Andrew, born Sept. 16, 
1830, married Agnes Kirkpatrick and (sec- 
ond) Margaret Hersehberger, and resides in 
Indiana borough; and Thomas Johnson, born 
July 28, 1834, died Aug. 17, 1844. 

Samuel Gailey, son of Andrew Gailey, was 
given the advantages offered b.v the subscrip- 
tion schools of his day and locality, attending 
a little log schoolhouse situated a long dis- 
tance from his father's farm. While not at 
school he assisted his father and brothers in 
the cultivation of the home property, and was 
reared to habits of industry, integrity and 
sobriety. Mr. Gailey was a pioneer in the 
threshing business, for many years traveling 



over the country with his threshing outfit, but 
did not allow this to interfere with his farm- 
ing and stock raising operations, and for a 
long pei'iod he was known as one of his town- 
ship 's leading stockmen. Mr. Gailey has 
reached the time of life when he feels that he 
is entitled to rest from the activities of former 
years, but his faculties are still unimpaired, 
and he reads readily without the aid of glasses.' 
His fine farm of 140 acres is being operated 
under his direction by his son, who has in- 
herited many of his father's excellent traits 
of character. For many years Mr. Gailey 
has been prominent in Republican politics, 
serving as overseer of the poor and school di- 
rector, and no important movement in Cone- 
maugh is regarded as complete unless it has 
enlisted his support. One of the founders of 
the United Presbyterian Church, he has been 
a lifelong member thereof, and is now serving 
as an elder and trustee. 

Mr. Gailey was married to Catherine Alex- 
ander, who was bom near Greensburg, West- 
moreland county, and reared near Freeport, 
daughter of Nathaniel and Maiy (Brown) 
Alexander. Mr. and Mrs. Gailey have had 
the following children: Renwick Cameron, 
born May 19, 1856, married Winifred Davie) 
and resides at Edgewood, Pa., where he is 
engaged in the insurance business (they have 
one son, Samuel Davie) ; Andrew Porter, a 
resident of New Kensington, Pa., married Re- 
becca Shearer, and (second) Mi-s, Nettie Alex- 
ander, and has a daughter, Martha C, and 
a son, Samuel W. ; N. Elmer, the proprietor 
of a grain elevator at Dodge City, Kans., mar- 
ried Delia Wehr; Mary Elmira married W. 
C. Shearer, a farmer of Armstrong county. 
Pa., and their children are Meade, Ren G., 
George, Naomi R., William C, Margaret 
Jean, John D. and Catharine E. ; John Hen- 
derson, who married Emma Wehr, has three 
children, Dorothy, Jennie W. and John Alex- 
ander, and they reside in Pittsburg; Elza 
Brown is unmarried; Margaret Matilda re- 
sides at home with her parents; Josiah Ful- 
ton, who lives at home, is conducting the farm 
for his father. 

Samuel Gailey has had a long and useful 
life, and now, in his declining years, may 
look back over his career without regret, con- 
tented in the knowledge that he has assisted 
in no small degree in bettering his commu- 
nity, and that the success which has been his 
has come to him through no unfair means. 
He has a wide circle of appreciative friends 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



and is well deserving of the universal respect 
and esteem that is undoubtedly his. 

ALEXANDER H. STEWART, M. D., 
physician and surgeon at Marion Center, In- 
diana Co., Pa., was born in the village of 
Plumville, this county, July 22, 1880, son 
of Joseph Harvey and Mary (Miller) Stewart. 

Joseph Stewart, the gi-andfather of Dr. 
Stewart, was an early settler of Rayne town- 
ship, Indiana county, having been brought to 
this section by his father when he was a lad. 
He later removed to South Mahoning town- 
ship, and there continued to engage in farm- 
ing until his death, in 1882. 

Joseph Harvey Stewart, son of Joseph Stew- 
art, was born in Rayne township, and in his 
early life was engaged in school teaching in 
Indiana county, continuing as an educator 
throughout his life and dying in 1898. His 
wife, who was born in South Slahoning town- 
ship, still survives, and is a resident of the 
town of Indiana, Pa. They had only one 
child, Alexander H. 

Alexander H. Miller, the maternal grand- 
father of Dr. Stewart, and for whom he is 
named, was an early settler of South Mahon- 
ing township, where the greater part of his 
life was devoted to agricultural pursuits. 

Alexander H. Stewart secured his prelimi- 
nary education in the public schools of In- 
diana, and in 1897 was graduated from the 
high school there. Subsequently he attended 
the Indiana State normal school, and after 
some preparation became a student in the 
"Western University of Penns.ylvania, where 
he received his medical degree in 1907. For 
the two years following he was engaged in the 
practice of his profession at Marion Center, 
in December, 1909, moving to Idamar, in 
Green township, Indiana county, where he 
has acquired a large and lucrative profes- 
sional patronage. On Sept. 3, 1912, he moved 
thence to his present location, at Marion Cen- 
ter. He is a member of the Indiana County 
Medical Society, the Pennsylvania State Med- 
ical Society and the American Medical As- 
sociation, in the work of which bodies he takes 
a keen and active interest, and bears a high 
reputation among his professional confreres. 

On Aug. 19, 1908. Dr. Stewart was united 
in marriage with Maud V. Cameron, who 
was born in Cherryhill township April 12, 
1883, daughter of John G. and Elizabeth 
(Wilson) Cameron, the latter of whom died 
in 1901. Mrs. Stewart's father was for a num- 
ber of years engaged in farming, but after 
serving one term as commissioner in 1892 en- 



gaged in the insurance business, with which 
he is at present connected, having made his 
home in the town of Indiana since that year. 
Mrs. Stewart's parents had six daughters: 
Clara, the wife of J. N. Langham, an at- 
torney of Indiana; Chrissie, a teacher in the 
public schools of Pittsburg; Cora, living at 
home ; Miriam, the wife of Oscar A. St. Clair, 
of Chicago; Madge V., living at home; and 
Maud v., who married Dr. Stewart. The 
two last named are twins. 

Dr. and ]\Irs. Stewart have one child, John 
Plarvey. The Doctor and his wife are mem- 
bers of the United Presbyterian Church. 
During his residence in Green township he 
served as president of the school board. 

JOSEPH E. PARNELL, senior member of 
the insurance firm of Parnell, Cowher & Co., 
is engaged in business on lines so typical of 
the advanced spirit of the age that his work 
deserves special mention. 

The Parnells are of English descent, and he 
was born in Dauphin county, Pa., son of John 
Parnell. The early years of his life were 
spent at Houtzdale* Clearfield Co.. Pa. This 
was in a mining district, and by reason of 
this early association with that industry Mr. 
Parnell had the opportunities, of which he 
took full advantage, of acquiring a Itorough 
and technical knowledge of all departments of 
the mining industiy. At the age of seventeen 
he began to teach school, following that oc- 
cupation for two years. At that time and 
afterward, for a total period of three years, 
the study of law engaged his attention, but 
recognizing the unusual opportunity offered 
at that time by the insurance situation in this 
country, Mr. Parnell decided to specialize in 
that direction instead of entering on the gen- 
eral practice of law. At that time, to a very 
large extent, there was a lack of trained men 
in the insurance business, who possessed not 
only a thorough knowledge of the technical 
side of insurance, but also a more or less com- 
plete technical knowledge of the mining and 
manufacturing industries, tocether witli suffi- 
cient legal training to furnish the necessary 
equipment for the proper handling of insur- 
ance on the properties of large manufactur- 
ing and mining corporations. This is espe- 
cially true regarding the fire hazards in con- 
nection with properties, the elimination of 
which has furni.shed the demand for a new 
class of trained men, known as "insurance 
engineers," whose diity it is to give most care- 
ful attention to the removal from property of 
fire hazards, and in this work Mr. Parnell is 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



955 



recognized as one of the leaders. Along these 
lines the firm of Pamell, Cowher & Co. has 
worked for the last eighteen years and has 
achieved a large degree of success, handling 
at the present time a larger volume of busi- 
ness than any other firm between Pittsburg 
and Philadelphia. They maintain offices at 
Patton, Pa., and Windber, Pa., but the office 
at Indiana, Pa., under the personal direction 
of Mr. Parnell since 1909, at which time he 
moved to Indiana, is the largest and most im- 
portant of the three. 

This combination of insurance, engiueer- 
ing, legal and industrial training and ability 
has proved of so much value to the customers 
and clients of this firm that the business is 
growing rapidly and the services of Parnell, 
Cowher & Co. are becoming more and more 
in demand each year. Mr. Parnell is recog- 
nized as the leading spirit in this successful 
firm and is regarded throughout the State as 
one of the best authorities and experts on 
all phases of insurance. 

In 1897 Mr. Parnell married Vindetta C. 
Smith, daughter of John G. Smith, of Tip- 
ton, Blair Co., Pa., and they have two chil- 
dren, Gilbert Smith Parnell and Elizabeth 
Stewart Parnell. The entire family is identi- 
fied with the Presbyterian Church. 

HARRY E. ALLISON, principal of the 
public school at Dixonville, Indiana county, 
has been engaged in teaching in the schools of 
this county ever since he commenced his in- 
dependent career and has established a high 
reputation in his pi-ofessiou. Mr. Allison was 
born in Indiana county Jan. 20, 1888, son of 
Harvey and Susanna (Bartlebaugh) Allison. 
The father is a native of Jefferson county, Pa., 
the mother of Indiana county. Harvey Alli- 
son was engaged in farming for a number of 
years, and is now living retired in East Ma- 
honing township. 

Harry E. Allison obtained his education in 
the public schools of Indiana county, and was 
a j'outh of only seventeen when he commenced 
teaching. He was thus engaged in Pine, 
Cherryhill and Rayne townships before he 
came to Green township, and meantime pre- 
pared himself for more advanced work, at- 
tending summer schools at Penn Riin and 
Marion Center, this county. In April, 1912, 
he came to Dixonville, Green township, and 
was appointed to his present position as prin- 
cipal of the public school. He is a young man 
of sterling qualities, his high character as well 
as his mental attainments fitting him for his 
chosen field, in which he has won the good 



will and approval of all who have come to 
know and appreciate his work. 

On Sept. 1, 1910, Mr. Allison married Fan- 
nie E. Myers, who was born Dec. 9, 1890, in 
Rayne township, Indiahia county, daughter of 
Foster and Ella ( Pence ) Myers, who live on 
a fami in Rayne township ; Mr. and Mrs. My- 
ers are natives of Indiana county. 

SAMUEL SHERWOOD WETZEL, pro- 
prietor of the Locust Hill Stock Farm in East 
Mahoning township, was born in Bell town- 
ship, Clearfield Co., Pa., July 20, 1850. 

The Wetzel family comes of German stock, 
and its representatives have long been associ- 
ated with the growth and development of 
Pennsylvania. Rinehart Wetzel, the founder 
of the family in this region, was born in Ger- 
many and was nine years of age when brought 
to this country by his parents. They lo- 
cated in Lancaster county. Pa., where he grew 
to maturity, there marrying Sarah Yost. 
Later he moved with his family to Clearfield 
county, and there he rounded out his life, dy- 
ing in 1848, when still in the very prime of 
life, being only fifty-two years old. His wife 
died in 1840, aged forty-two years. Their 
children were : Enoch B., who married Har- 
riet Campbell ; Henry ; Jacob Yost ; John M. ; 
Mary, who married Daniel K. McGee ; James 
S., who married Sarah Bird; Sarah, who mar- 
ried John Brown; and Christiana. 

Henry Wetzel, father of Samuel Sherwood 
Wetzel, and son of Rinehart Wetzel, was born 
at Miffiintown, Juniata Co., Pa., in 1821, and 
was still a child when the family went to 
Clearfield county. Locating in Bell township, 
that county, he learned the carpenter's trade, 
and worked at it for some time after he was 
married, but eventually engaged in farming, 
settling on the homestead of 183 acres. This 
property had been secured by his father, and 
was a valuable tract of land. He was also 
engaged in rafting logs down the Susque- 
hanna to Marietta. In 1864 he came to In- 
diana county, settling in East Mahoning town- 
ship, where he bought 145 acres of land known 
as the David Alp farm, and on it he erected 
a substantial house and barn and made other 
adequate improvements, residing there until 
1878, when he retired to Marion Center. In 
that village he spent the remainder of his days 
in a house he built, dying there April 24, 1894, 
aged seventy -two years, eight months, six days. 
His remains were laid to rest in Marion Cen- 
ter cemetery. A strong Methodist, he was a 
trustee of the church for many years. Elected 
school director on the Democratic ticket, he 



956 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



gave good service in that office, and also in 
that of supervisor. 

Henry Wetzel married Mary Katherine 
"Weaver, who died on the homestead and is 
buried by his side. She, too, was a ^Methodist. 
Their children were: Samuel Sherwood is 
mentioned below ; Ruth Amanda, who married 
John S. Glasser, resides in Brushvalley town- 
ship; Sarah Ellen married Kinley Hunter, 
of East Mahoning township, and is deceased ; 
John Rinehart, a farmer of Burrell township, 
married Nina Smyers; Harry Pater married 
Bell J. Rankin; James Burton died young; 
Wilbur Enoch lives at Homer City, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Samuel Sherwood Wetzel, son of Henry 
Wetzel, was educated in the schools of his 
native township, growing up amid healthy 
rural surroundings. He learned farming and 
also engaged in rafting until the family came 
to Indiana county, when he was fourteen years 
old. From then on he continued to work with 
his father until he attained his majority, and 
then started out for himself, engaging in lum- 
bering and rafting for a time, taking rafts 
down the river from Cherrytree to Lock- 
haven. Eventually, however, he began farm- 
ing in Raj-ne township, on the James Mc- 
Laughlin farm of 300 acres, which he oper- 
ated for four years. Mr. Wetzel then located 
on the Luther Richards farm in East Mahon- 
ing township, and farmed its 100 acres for 
four years, during which period he became 
largely interested in stock raising and handled 
an immense lot of cattle, sheep and hogs. At 
the expiration of the four years he moved 
onto his father's homestead in the same town- 
ship and continued his stock operations, deal- 
ing heavily in horses and mules, having as a 
partner in the latter line N. Cook Simpson. 
These men sold their stock to the coal mines 
in Jefferson, Clearfield. Clarion. Cambria and 
Indiana counties and controlled an extensive 
business. In 1891 ]\Ir. Wetzel settled on his 
present property, known as the Locust Hill 
Stock Farm, which was formerly owned by 
Hugh Lawson. continuing his stock business. 
In time Mr. Wetzel added to his original 
holdings, and now has 350 acres, a portion of 
which is in Rayne township. He has made 
extensive and valuable improvements on his 
property, ,nnd is very extensively engaged in 
raising Jersey cattle" and blooded stock. For 
the last thirteen years he has been operating 
a coal bank on his farm, from which he has 
already mined over lOO.OOO busnels of coal, 
sellins it in the locality. In addition to his 
valuable agricultural holdings. Mr. Wetzel 



is a stockholder and director of the Marion 
Center National Bank, and a man of depend- 
able solidity in the business world. 

For years he has been a member of the 
Jlethodist Church of JIarion Center, and ow- 
ing to his own temperate habits and belief in 
the abolition of the liquor traffic, he has given 
his hearty support to the Prohibition party. 
He has been the nominee of his party for va- 
rious eountj' offices, but owing to the predomi- 
nance of other parties was not elected, al- 
though he ran ahead of his ticket because of 
his personal popularity. 

In 1872 Mr. Wetzel was married to Dor- 
inda Griffith, who was born in Somerset coun- 
ty. Pa., daughter of Hiram Griffith. They 
had children as follows: Silas, who has been 
on the police force of New York City since 
1895 ; Lewis G., who is car inspector for the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Pit- 
cairn, Pa. ; Henry Harrison, who is farming 
a portion of the homestead ; Charles, engaged 
in coal mining; George R., at home; Sarah, 
unmarried; JIary. who died young; and 
James, who died young. Mrs. Wetzel died in 
1893, and in 1895 Mr. Wetzel married (sec- 
ond) Mary Work, a daughter of William A. 
Work, and they have two children : Wil- 
liam, who is attending the high school of In- 
diana; and Ernest, who is at home. In ad- 
dition Mr. and Mrs. Wetzel have adopted a 
daughter, Grace Ella, whom they are rearing 
with tender parental care as their own. 

Having worked very hard all his life, Mr. 
Wetzel can .justly lay claim to being a self- 
made man. What he is and has is the result 
of his own. unaided efforts, and he has every 
reason to be proud of what he has accom- 
plished. In addition to securing his own ma- 
terial advancement he has exerted a powerful 
influence for good in his community, both 
through the church and the interests of the 
Proliibition party. He has brotight up a tine 
family and has trained them to be useful citi- 
zens, and they are strong factors in the moral 
uplift of the several communities in which 
they have settled. 

CLARENCE C. SPICHER, M. D., physi- 
cian and surgeon, who has been established in 
his profession at Starford, Pa., since 1904, 
was born in Montgomery' township. Indiana 
county. Sept. 20, 1874. a son of John D. and 
Mary" Elizabeth (Stahl) Spicher. 

The srreat-great-grandfather of Dr. Spicher 
came from Germany and settled in Somerset 
county. Pennsylvania. 

Samuel Spicher. the great-grandfather, was 



HISTOEY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



957 



born in Somerset county, Pa., in 1801, and 
married Magdalene Barkey in 1821. 

Peter Spicher, son of Samuel, and grand- 
father of Dr. Spicher, was born in Somerset 
county, but was an early settler in ^lont- 
gomery township, Indiana county, which con- 
tinued to be his home until his death, and he 
was survived by several sons and daughters. 

John Decker .Spicher, son of Peter, and 
father of Dr. Spicher, was born in Montgom- 
ery township, Indiana county, and now lives 
retired at Hillsdale, Pa. For some years he 
has been in the furniture and undertaking 
business and he also cultivated part of the 
old homestead farm. He married Mary Eliza- 
beth Stahl, who was born in Indiana county, 
and died in iloutgomery township in 1908. 
Her father, Samuel Stahl, was an early set- 
tler in Cherryhill township and owned a 
farm there. Seven children were born to the 
parents of Dr. Spicher, namely : Orange, who 
is now deceased ; Geary, who lives in ]Mont- 
gomery township; Clarence C. : ISertha ilay, 
who is deceased; OUie JMinerva, who is a pro- 
fessional nurse residing in Philadelphia ; Flor- 
ence, who is deceased; and Emory E., who is 
in the U. S. navy. 

Clarence C. Spicher attended school in 
Montgomer.v township through boyhood and 
early youth and then taught the local school 
prior to entering the State normal school at 
Indiana ; later he was a student for one year 
at Lebanon University. He received his medi- 
cal training in the Baltimore ^Medical College, 
at Baltimore, ]\Id., where he spent four years. 
being graduated in May, 1903. For one year 
he engaged in. practice at Dixonville, Pa., and 
then came to Starford. 

In December, 1899, Dr. Spicher was married 
at Greensburg, Pa., to Ada Houck, who was 
born at Purchase Line, Indiana Co., Pa., a 
daughter of George F. and Sarah (Buter- 
baugh) Houck, the latter now deceased. 

George F. Houck, father of Mrs. Spicher, 
was a shoemaker in his earlier years, but later 
became a farmer. He still survives. His ehil- 
dred are: Ada, who became ]Mrs. Spicher; 
Alice, who is the widow of Jesse Churchill ; 
Earl, who is a physician and surgeon, gradu- 
ating from Baltimore iledical College in 1906 ; 
and Roy, who is a pharmacist. Four children 
have been born to Dr. and Mrs. Spicher: 
Lweyn, Irene, Gwendolin and Helen. Dr. 
Spicher and family are members of the Bap- 
tist Church. Fraternally he is identitied with 
the Knights of Pythias and the Elks, the 
former at Starford and the latter at Indiana, 
.and professionally belongs to the county and 



State medical societies, and the American Med- 
ical Association. 

JOHN HARRISON SWASY, a successful 
farmer and stock raiser of Blacklick township, 
Indiana county, is a native of that part of the 
county, born Feb. 10, 1850, in Ccnlcr tiwu- 
ship. This family has long been settled in 
New York State, and many of the name are 
to be found on Long Island and in central 
and northern New York, as well as in New 
Jerse.y and elsewhere. It has been spelled in 
various ways. 

John Swasy, the founder of the branch in 
Indiana county. Pa., was a native of New York 
State, and crossed the Allegheny mountains 
when a young man, looking for a location 
where he could make a home. He settled not 
far from what is now Homer City, in Center 
township, this county, where he engaged in 
farming and passed the remainder of his life, 
dying on his farm. He owned a tract of 109 
acres. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Bonner, also died on the homestead. They 
were members of the M. E. Church. Three 
children were born to this pioneer couple: 
Rebecca, John and Jane. 

John Swasy, son of John, was born May 21, 
1824, on the farm in Center township, and 
attended subscription school in the neighbor- 
hood. He followed agricultural pursuits all 
his life on the homestead, was a hard worker, 
and became a much respected citizen of his 
locality. He died on the farm July 18, 1895, 
and is buried in Oakland cemetery, at Indi- 
ana. Mr. Swasy was a member of the M. E. 
Church at Homer City. In political associ- 
ation he was a Democrat, but he never took 
any part in public matters. On Nov. 17. 
1846, he was married, in White township, 
this county, to Sarah B. Allison, who survives 
him, residing on the home farm. She became 
the mother of five children : IMartha married 
Houston Monshower and resides in Worcester. 
Mass. ; John Harrison is mentioned below ; 
Hannah, wife of Lemuel Kunkle, resides on 
the homestead in Center township ; Mary Ann 
mai-ried John Anthony, of Armstrong town- 
ship. Indiana Co.. Pa.: Robert Allison makes 
his home ;it Hiii'. Pennsylvania. 

The Allisdii family, to which Mrs. Swasy 
belonas, were among the first white settlers 
in what is now Center township. A full his- 
tory of its early representatives here will be 
found elsewhere in this work. Andrew Alli- 
son, son of Robert, settled in Center township 
in 1788; he had been a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionarv war. His son Robert Allison, born 



958 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Feb. 9, 1794, married April 14, 1819, Hannah 
Brj'an, who died March 24, 1879; his death 
occurred Aug. 15, 1866. They had a family 
of eleven children, born as follows: Han- 
nah, April 14, 1820 (died Sept. 25. 1S3S) ; 
Jane, Feb. 24, 1822; Nathan B., Jan. 7, 1824 
(died April 6, 1828) ; Sarah, Jan. 27. 1826 
(now the widow of John Swasy ) ; Eebecca. 
March 31, 1828; Martha, Feb. 16, 1830; Mary, 
Feb. 19, 1832 (died Jan. 17, 1853); Nancy, 
March 1, 1834; Charles T., Feb. 15. 183— 
(died Aug. 25, 1863, while serving in the Civil 
war); James S., Aug. 9, 1842; Emma J., 
March 20, 1848. 

John Harrison Swasy spent his boyhood 
days on the home farm and obtained his educa- 
tion in the local public schools. Remaining at 
home until he reached the age of twentj^-two 
years, he then started farming on his own ac- 
count in Blaeklick township, on the Lyons 
homestead, a tract of 126 acres where' he bas 
since resided, and upon which he has made 
extensive improvements. In 1901 he built a 
substantial and convenient barn, and in 1908 
erected the handsome residence which he and 
his family now occupy. Other buildings have 
also been put up which add materially to the 
equipment and value of the property, and 
Mr. Swasy has been very well rewarded for 
the years of thrifty labor he has put upon 
the place. He is not only interested in the 
prosperity of his own affairs, but also in the 
advancement of the general welfare, and sup- 
ports every movement which promises to bene- 
fit his township and fellow citizens, beinp; pub- 
lie-spirited on all matters pertaining to his 
community. In politics he is a stanch Demo- 
crat. He was one of the organizers and 
charter members of the local Grange, No. 317, 
Patrons of Husbandly, and has acted as stew- 
ard of that l:)ody, in the promotion of whose 
interests he has taken an active part. His re- 
ligious connection is with Hopewell M. E. 
Church, of which he is a trustee. 

On June 3, 1875, Mr, Swas.v married, in 
Blaeklick township, Myrtilla Lyons, who was 
born there, daughter of William and Eliza 
(De\ane.v) Lyons, and they have had three 
children: Myrtle, formerl,v a school teacher 
of Indiana countv, who married J. Elder 
Smith, son of John T. Smith, of Blaeklick 
township ; Logan, at home ; and Charles 0., 
who is now clerking for the Josephine Fur- 
nace & Coke Company of Josephine, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

James Lyons, the first of his family to set- 
tle in Indiana county, was born in Ireland, 
and came to America in 1764, some years be- 



fore the Revolution. He made his home in 
Pennsylvania, at first in the Conochocheague 
valley, moving in 1808 to Blaeklick township, 
then a part of Westmoreland county. His 
children were: Samuel, Alexander and 
James, 

Alexander Lyons, son of James, married 
Margaret McFarland, and to them were born 
five children : :\Iartha, wife of ^Matthew Lich- 
enthall of Prairie City, 111.; James A., of 
Beaver county. Pa. : Mary, who married James 
Reed, of Prairie City, 111. ; Eliza A., deceased; 
and William, of Blaeklick township, Indiana 
Co., Pennsylvania. 

William Lyons, son of Alexander, was bom 
on the homestead, and followed farming the 
greater part of his life. He spent some years 
at Steubenville, Ohio, where he kept store, 
later returning to the homestead, where he 
cultivated a tract of 118 acres now owned by 
George Clawson. He made a number of im- 
provements on that place, where he spent the 
remainder of his life, dying there Jan. 31, 
1881. He is buried in the Ebenezer cemetery 
in Conemaugh township. In religion he was 
a Presbyterian, in political sentiment a Re- 
publican. His wife, Eliza (Deviney), daugh- 
ter of Aaron Deviney, died in 1876, on the 
homestead; she was a member of the United 
Presbyterian Church. They had a family of 
ten children: Newton died while serving in 
the Civil war; Martha died in 1909: Melissa 
married George Harmon, of Cuba, Mo. ; Alex- 
ander is deceased: William died in infancy; 
Ella married Jlark Hunter, of Peoria, 111., 
and is deceased; M.vrtilla married John Har- 
rison Swasy; Harriet married Harry ]\Iahon, 
of Pittsburg; Dudley lives in Westmoreland 
county; Luna married Dayton Ray and re- 
sides in Youngstown, Ohio. 

JOHN L. PENCE, of Cherryhill township, 
has one of the handsomest farm properties in 
Indiana county. He has lived at his present 
home since 1903. Mr. Bence was born near 
Dixonville, in Rayne township, this county. 
Aug. 17. 1875. His grandfather. Samuel 
Bence. is still living in Ra.vne township, now 
(1912) aged ninet.v-two ,vears. He and his 
wife, Elizabeth, who was a native of Germany, 
were early settlers in that township. 

James Bence. father of John L. Bence 
was born in Indiana count.v. and became a 
farmer in early life, always following that oc- 
cupation, except for the time he was in the 
Union army during the Civil war. His pres- 
ent home is near Dixonville. He married 
Rosina Everwiue, who was born in Indiana 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



959 



county, daughter of Jacob Everwine, aud they 
became the parents of ten children, namely: 
Laura, who is the wife of F. B. Longwill, of 
the borough of Indiana : Harry E., a resident 
of Marion Center. Indiana county ; John L. ; 
Charles, of Dixonville. this county, who con- 
ducts a general store in partnership with his 
brother Logan; Luther, who lives on the old 
home place in Rayne township ; Logan, of In- 
diana; Mary, wife of P. Hoer. living near 
Dixonville; Genevieve, a trained nurse, of 
Pittsburg, Pa. ; Elizabeth, deceased ; and 
Jacob, deceased. The mother of this family 
died eighteen years ago. 

John L. Pence received his education in 
Rayne township. During his boyhood he 
worked on the farm, and in his youth he was 
employed in a stoi-e at Dixonville for a year. 
He has been engaged in farming on his own 
account since 1899. and in 1903 removed to 
the home in Cherryhill township which he now 
occupies and which he has bought. He built 
a handsome brick residence, one of the finest 
farmhouses in Indiana county, and in other 
respects as well his farm is improved accord- 
ing to the most modern ideas, the appearance 
of the place being highly creditable to its 
owner. Mr. Pence is intelligent and syste- 
matic in his work, and his profitable agricul- 
tural operations are the best recommendation 
for his methods. 

On Nov. 12, 1903, Mr. Pence was married 
to Ada B. Ackerson, a native of Indiana coun- 
ty, the marriage taking place near Dixonville. 
Mrs. Pence is a daughter of James P. and 
Emma M. (Parber) Ackerson, farming peo- 
ple, who have lived in this county since 1866. 
They had a family of seven children: Dr. 
Lewis E., a dentist, of Clymer; James "Wes- 
ley, a farmer of Cherryhill township; Mary 
M., deceased; Judson, deceased; Ada P., 
Mrs. Pence; Frank, a farmer near Marion 
Center, Indiana county; and Nora, li\ing at 
home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pence have had two children, 
Seward J. and Ralph. They are members of 
the Presbyterian Church at Penn Run, and 
in political sentiment Mr. Pence is a Repub- 
lican. 

WILLIAM HOUSTON, of Placklick, in 
Purrell township, has served as justice of the 
peace since 1904, and in that position and 
other public relations has become well and 
favorably known to the residents of his sec- 
tion of Indiana county. He was born in 
Placklick township May 20, 1847, a member 
of the third generation of his family to live 



in this region, where his grandfather settled 
in pioneer days. 

James Houston, the grandfather, came in 
an early day to what was then Center town- 
ship, where he obtained possession of a tract 
of 640 acres, having what was known as a 
Revolutionary war gi-ant. From this circum- 
stance it is supposed he was a soldier in the 
Revolution, and it is known he was a capable 
Indian fighter. Farming was his occupation 
after he settled here, and he worked hard to 
clear his land and improve it. He was a 
member of the Christian Church evi noted 
for his high character. In politics he was 
a Whig. He died on his farm and is buried 
in the family plot there, known as Houston's 
cemetery. His wife, Mary (Reed), was a 
daughter of David Reed, a noted pioneer and 
Indian fighter of this section of Pennsylvania. 
She, too, was a member of the Christian 
Church. Four children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Houston : James ; William ; Nancy, who 
married Norman Landfair; and Emily, who 
married Thomas Stites. 

James Houston, son of James and Mary 
(Reed) Houston, was born in 1802 in Center 
township. He acquired a thorough common 
school education, and taught subscription 
schools in his early manhood, boarding around 
at the homes of the various pupils, as was 
then the custom. He taught the first free 
school established in his neighborhood after 
the introduction of the system. Having re- 
ceived 100 acres of the homestead farm from 
his father, he made farming his principal 
occupation. There were a log house and a 
log barn on this tract, which was then in- 
cluded in Placklick township, and there he 
continued to follow agricultural pursuits un- 
til his death, which occurred in 1852, when 
he was in his prime. He was interred in the 
Houston graveyard. An intelligent and well- 
read man, he was looked up to in the com- 
munity and universally respected. In polit- 
ical opinion he was a Whig, in church con- 
nection a member of the Christian denomi- 
nation. His wife, Jennie (Clawson), a na- 
tive of Placklick township, was a daughter 
of Josiah Clawson, and her family were old 
settlers there. She died at the home of her 
son William, who cared for her tenderly in 
her old age, and was laid to rest in the fam- 
ily cemetery. Like her husband she was a 
member of the Christian Church. Six chil- 
dren were born to them: John W., who is 
deceased; Josiah Clawson, who resides in 
Johnstown, Pa. ; Mary Jane, who married 
John Pennett and resides in Burrell town- 



960 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



ship ; James, who died young ; William ; and 
Sarah Margaret, who married Alexander 
Rankin. 

William Houston was but five years old 
when his father died, and accordingly he had 
to commence work early. His opportunities 
for education were such as the local public 
schools afforded. Remaining at home, he 
farmed the 100-acre tract his father had 
owned for several years, and made a num- 
ber of improvements on the place, which he 
eventually sold, in 1875, buying the sixty- 
acre place known as the Householder farm, 
in Blaekliek township. While residing there 
he followed general farming and stock rais- 
ing, and also dealt in stock to some extent. 
He lived there until 1903, in which year he 
sold the place, which was underlaid with coal 
and has since been developed along that line. 
He then removed to the town of Blacklick, 
where he has ever since made his home, and 
he is now interested in the real estate busi- 
ness and represents the Hartford ^Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. In 
1904 he received an appointment from the 
governor of the State as .iustiee of the peace, 
to succeed the late justice, S(|uire J. R. Pierce, 
filling out his unexpired term, and he has 
since been honored with election to the office, 
in which he has been kept continuously. He 
is noted for his keen .judgment and imparti- 
ality, and while some of his decisions have 
been appealed to the higher courts they have 
generally been sustained. Mr. Houston has 
a strong sense of responsibility in the dis- 
charge of his duties which has made him a 
valued official. Before his removal to Black- 
lick he held a number of township offices, 
having been overseer of the poor, school di- 
rector for nine years, assessor and supervisor, 
and giving thoi-ough, satisfaction in every 
capacity. In political association he has al- 
ways been a stanch Republican. 

Mr. Houston was married in Blacklick 
township to Jennie Clawson, daughter of Rich- 
ard S. and Eleanora (Davis) Clawson. 
Though bearing the same maiden name as his 
mother, she was not related. Of the twelve 
children born to ]Mr. and Mrs. Houston two 
died young, and we have the following record 
of the family: Wesley I., formerly a school 
teacher, is now a minister of the Christian 
Church, residing at Nezperce, Idaho; Emory 
M. settled on the Pacific coast and died in 
California: James R., formerly a scliool 
teacher, now mine foreman at ^Mineral Point. 
Cambria Co.. T'a.. married Gertrude Thomp- 
son and has two children. Ruth and Clair: 



Alice G. married J. Dixon Avery and resides 
in Pittsburg ; Bertha, formerly a teacher, mar- 
ried J. Howard Stewart and has had four 
children, George Howard (deceased), William 
Houston, Robert Coe and Emory Jackson 
(they live at Avalon, Allegheny Co., Pa.) : 
Carrie is engaged as .school teacher at Blairs- 
ville; AVilliam Roy resides in Pittsburg: 
Hood Elder lives at Detroit. Mich.; Nell T. 
is a student of the State normal at ludiana ; 
Helen is engaged as stenographer and type- 
writer at Pittsburg; Ralph died in young 
manhood: Martha died in infancy. All of 
this family have received excellent educa- 
tional advantages, and have been well started 
in life. Mr. and Mrs. Houston and their 
children are members of the Christian Church 
at Indiana, of which he is a deacon. 

ROBERT Y. ELDER, retired citizen of 
Saltsburg, and director of the First National 
Bank of that borough, is a native of Indiana 
county. Pa., born at Eldersridge. in Young 
township, April 6, 1840. son of Robert and 
Nancy W. (Douglas) Elder. 

Robert Elder, the progenitor of the family 
in America, was bom at Dromore. County 
Down. Ireland, and was of Scotch extraction. 
He came to the American Colonies in 1730, 
locating in Dauphin county. Pa., about five 
miles from Ilarrisburg, and after the close 
of the Revolutionary war came to Indiana 
county with his family, making the journey 
over the mountains with pack horses, and lo- 
cating in what is now Conemaugh township, 
in the wilderness. Here the family erected a 
temporary hut in the woods, and later suc- 
ceeded in building a cabin from hewed logs, 
which structiire was subseqiiently used as a 
blockhouse. In this building the pioneer died 
in 1790 or 1791. his wife surviving until April 
15, 1813. They were buried in Ebenezer 
Church cemetery. Robert Elder married 
Mary Taylor for his second wife, and to them 
there were boi-n four childi-en. as follows: 
James, who married Martha Robinson in 1792 : 
David, born in 1764, who married Ann Nes- 
bitt in 1790. and in 1816 moved to Ohio: 
Robert, born in 1767 ; and Ann, who married 
Archibald ^Marshall. 

Robert Elder (2). son of Robert the pro- 
genitor, was nineteen years of age when the 
family came across the Allegheny mountains 
from Dauphin county to the new home in 
western Pennsylvania. He settled down to 
farming, making his home in Conemaugh 
township, on the eastern half of the original 
tract. He died while in the prime of life, in 




^^^4__ 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



961 



1813, being but forty-six years of age. To 
him and bis wife Mary (Smith), who died in 
1857, were born children as follows: Mar- 
garet, who mai*ried William Ewing; Joshua; 
Mary, who married John Leard; Ann; Han- 
nah, and Robert. 

Robert Elder (3), son of Robert (2), and 
father of Robert Y. Elder, was born in 1809, 
and made his home at Eldersridge, in Young 
township, becoming the largest land owner in 
that section of the county, where he had SOU 
acres, as well as a farm of 100 acres in Arm- 
strong county. Mr. Elder made extensive im- 
provements on his lands and built a fine brick 
dwelling house on the homestead farm at El- 
dersridge, continuing to engage in farming 
and stock raising there until his death, in 
1890, in his eighty-first year. He was buried 
in Eldersridge or Ridgeview cemetery. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian Church, 
and in his political views was a Whig and 
later a Republican. A very successful man in 
a business way, he never sought public honors, 
or position, but was domestic in his tastes and 
greatly devoted to his home and family. Mr. 
Elder married Nancy W. Douglas, daughter 
of John Douglas, and she died on the farm 
in 1896, at the age of eighty-one years, and 
was buried beside her husband. They had 
children as follows: Maria J., who married 
Thomas Elder and resides in Indiana; John 
Douglas, who was second lieutenant of Com- 
pany D, 62d Regiment, Pennsylvania Volun- 
teer Infantry, and was killed at the battle of 
Malvern Hill, while in command of his com- 
pany, July 2, 1862 ; Robert Y. ; Cordelia, wid- 
ow of Dr. Robert Barr ; Julia, who died young ; 
Lydia A., who married C. C. Collins; Jose- 
phine, who is deceased; Agnes V., who resides 
in Kansas with her sister; and Lizzie E., who 
married Harry S. Durrett, M. D., and resides 
in Kansas. 

Robert Y. Elder was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Young township and Eldersridge 
Academy, under Dr. Alexander Donaldson, 
and worked at home on the farm with his par- 
ents until May, 1864, when be enlisted in Com- 
pany C, 4th Pennsylvania Cavalry, under 
Capt. John C. Horrell and Colonel Young. 
He served in that company for a period of 
ten months, being mustered out of the service 
at Arlington Heights. Returning home, he 
continued on the homestead and followed 
farming until 1868, when he embarked in the 
mercantile business at Eldersridge, being thus 
engaged for a period of ten years, at the end 
of which time he again took up farming. Mr. 
Elder continued to carry on general farming 



and stock raising on a tract of 300 acres, on 
which he made numerous improvements, but 
in 1903 sold the land for coal mining pur- 
poses to the Pittsburg Gas Coal Company, 
and moved to Saltsburg, settling at what is 
known as Saltsburg Extension, where he now 
makes his home. After coming to Saltsburg 
he became engaged in the manufacturing busi- 
ness, but for a short time was at Mine La- 
motte. Mo., where he was manager of a de- 
partment store for over a year. He then re- 
turned to Saltsburg. Mr. Elder is a member 
of the board of directors of the First National 
Bank of that place. He has been prominent 
in 6i-and Army circles, having been at one 
time commander of Saltsburg Post, No. 36, 
of which he is now adjutant. He is a past 
master of Saltsburg Lodge, No. 431, F. & A. 
M. A stanch Republican in politics, he has 
served as school director, and at this time is 
a member of the board of trustees of the El- 
dersridge Academy. Formerly he was a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church at Elders- 
ridge, where he served as elder and was also 
active in the Sunday school, acting as assist- 
ant superintendent and later as superintend- 
ent. Since coming to Saltsburg he has been 
an elder in the church of that denomination 
here. 

On April 29, 1869, Mr. Elder was united in 
marriage with Mary E. Spalding, a native of 
Indiana county, daughter of Ge6rge and 
Sarah (Paul) Spalding. Mrs. Elder was well 
educated, attending public school in West- 
moreland county, and later Leechburg Acad- 
emy, Eldersridge Academy and Blairsville 
Seminary. She taught public school five 
years in Westmoreland and Indiana counties. 
Mr. and Mrs. Elder have had five children: 
Maude Wallace, Robert Roy, George Paul, 
Alice Mary and Helen Douglas. 

Maude Wallace Elder was born at Elders- 
ridge, and received exceptional educational 
advantages, attending the public schools of 
Young township, the State normal school at 
Indiana, Pa., and the University of Chicago. 
She taught in Eldersridge Academy, then 
spent three years teaching in Porto Rico, and 
for the last six years has been a teacher of 
languages in Franklin College, at New Athens, 
Ohio. 

Robert Roy Elder received his education in 
the public schools, Eldersridge Academy and 
Grove City College, where he was graduated 
in 1892. He then took a law course of three 
years in Pittsburg, and is now a successful 
practicing attorney in that city. He married 
Flora Edith Bargay, and they have two chil- 



962 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



(Ireii: ]\Iarioii Viola and Robert Kiiox, the 
latter being the ninth Robert in direct line 
in the Elder family. 

George Paul Elder was born at Eldersridge, 
and after attending the public schools became 
a student in Eldersridge Academy. Since his 
graduation from that institution he has been 
in business in Seattle, Washington. 

Alice Maiy Elder was educated in the pub- 
lic schools, Eldersridge Academy and Blairs- 
vilk- College for Women, and then taught pub- 
lie school for two years in Niagara, N. Dak., 
three years in Porto Rico, and three years in 
Medford, Oregon. She is now general secre- 
tary of the Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation, at Hershey, Pennsylvania. 

Helen Douglas Elder was educated in the 
public schools, Eldersridge Academy and 
Blairsville College for Women, and then 
graduated as a nurse from the Presbyteriai2 
College, of Allegheny, Pa. At present she is 
at home. 

JOHN D. WIDDOWSON, late of Indiana, 
had made his home in that borough from 1903, 
and was a lifelong resident of Indiana county, 
born in 1847 in Cherryhill township. His 
father, William Widdowson, was a native of 
England, and after settling in this country 
engaged quite extensively in the lumber busi- 
ness. He married Louisa Kime. 

Mr. Widdowson attended public school in 
Indiana county, and when a young man 
learned the carpenter's trade. Subsequently 
he engaged in lumbering and sawmilling, do- 
ing a large and successful business, which he 
built up by able management and intelligent 
use of his "opportunities. In 1903 he located 
at Indiana, where he built an elegant mod- 
ern home, and thereafter devoted his time 
principally to contracting and building, in 
which line he acquired extensive interests. 
Many of the handsome modem homes now 
standing in the borough are of his construc- 
tion. The last structure of any importance 
upon which he was engaged was the Christian 
church in Indiana. Mr. Widdowson was pub- 
lic-spirited and felt strongly on matters af- 
fecting the general welfare, and in the latter 
years of his life he was an ardent Proliibi- 
tionist. He was a prominent member of the 
Christian Church, which he served as deacon, 
and in that connection as in every other rela- 
tion of life was highly esteemed by all who 
knew him. His upright and useful life made 
him valued as a citizen, and he was recog- 
nized by his business associates as a most cap- 
able man, who had won success by the most 



commendable methods. He was the owner 
of considerable valuable property in Indiana. 
He died Nov. 21, 1911. 

In 1871 Mr. Widdowson was married to 
Jennie Hennigh, by whom he had a family 
of four children, namely: Luther. Earl, 
Charles and Lola. The mother died in 1885, 
and in 1887 Mr. Widdowson married Estella 
Webster, daughter of John and Emma (Hess) 
Webster. To their marriage were also born 
four children: Maud, wife of John B. ]Miteh- 
ell ; Paul ; Ruth, and Bernice. Mrs. Widdow- 
son and her family are members of the Chris- 
tian Church at Indiana. 

LEVI McGUIRE, who is engaged in farm- 
ing in Cherryhill township, where he owns a 
farm on Clymer Rural Free Delivery Route 
No. 1, was born in Cheriyhill township Feb. 
22, 1854, son of John and Elizabeth (Kerr) 
McGuire. 

James ]\IcGuire, grandfather of Levi Mc- 
Guire, was born in Blacklick township, In- 
diana Co., Pa., and at an early day came to 
Cherrj'hill township, later moving to Green 
township, settling on the present site of the 
town of Lovejoy. There he continued to be 
engaged in farming up to the time of his 
death. 

John McGuire, son of James, and father 
of Levi McGuii-e, was also bom in Blacklick 
towTiship, Indiana county, and as a lad was 
taken to the present site of the town of Cly- 
mer. During his early days he was a boat- 
man, working along the canal from Blairs- 
ville to Johnstown, but during his later years 
followed farming as a vocation, owning a 
handsome property in Cherryhill township. 
He was one of the best-known citizens of 
his community, serving for nine years as con- 
stable, and also acting as overseer of the poor 
and as county commissioner, and in his death, 
which occurred Jan. 27, 1896, his community 
lost one of its most representative men. To 
his marriage with Elizabeth Kerr were bora 
five children, those besides Levi being: 
Jennie, the wife of John Ollinger, a resident 
of Sample Run. who is engaged in farming; 
]Mary, the wife of Luther Helman. residing 
near Sample Run, in Cherryhill township ; 
Jolin, who resides in Clymer: and Clara, wife 
of Stephen Rowe, of Rayne township. 

Thomas Kerr, the maternal grandfather of 
Levi jMcGuire, was a native of Shelocta, In- 
diana Co., Pa., and followed farming and car- 
pentering on the old homestead until his 
death. Mrs. McGuire. his daughter, is still 
living at the age of seventy -seven years, and 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



makes her home with her son John, in Clymer. 

Levi McGuire attended school in Clierry- 
hill township, and when he could find time 
assisted his father in the work of the home 
farm. As a young man he learned the trade 
of brickmaking, which he followed for nine 
years, but since 1879 has been engaged in 
cultivating his present property. Mr. Mc- 
Guire was married Jan. 7, 1879, to Mary M. 
Wimer, who was born in' Green township, near 
Cookport, in 1856, daughter of William R. 
and Mary Jane (Lydick) "Wimer. John Wi- 
mer, her grandfather, was an early settler in 
Indiana county, where he spent his life in 
farming. William R. Wimer, son of John 
Wimer, was a farmer in Cherryhill township, 
and there died in 1895. He married Mary 
Jane Lydick, who was bom in what was 
known as the Lydick settlement, in Indiana 
county, daughter of Abraham Lydick, a pio- 
neer settler, farmer and lumberman of this 
county. The mother of Mrs. McGuire passed 
away in 1898. She had five children, of whom 
one died in infancy, the other being: Abra- 
ham L., a resident of Blairsville, Pa. ; Sarah 
C, widow of Henry Wissinger; Mrs. Mc- 
Guire ; and Arilla Jane, wife of Ellis Stiffler, 
a resident of Uniontown, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. and Mrs. McGuire have three children : 
Blanche, wife of Samuel Craig, of Rayne 
township, has five children, namely, Lillian, 
Violet, Floyd, Grace and. Donald; Irwin re- 
sides at home and assists his father in the 
farm work; Maude, also at home, was form- 
erly a school teacher. Mr. McGuire at this 
time is serving as school director of his town- 
ship, a position which he has held for sev- 
eral years. With his wife and family he at- 
tends the Christian Church. 

A. CLIFFORD HOOVER, manager of the 
Central Trading Company, of Clymer, Indi- 
ana count.y, was born on a farm in Clearfield 
county, Pa., about nine miles from the city 
of Clearfield, Nov. 6, 1884, son of Anderson 
and Mary (Baughman) Hoover. William 
Hoover, his paternal grandfather, was de- 
scended from German ancestry, and was the 
original settler on the old family homestead 
situated in Clearfield county. 

Anderson Hoover, son of William Hoover, 
was born on the old family place in Clear- 
field county, and there spent the greater part 
of his life in agricultui-al pursuits, his death 
occurring in June, 1906, in Clearfield, to 
which place he had retired a short time be- 
fore. His widow is still living in Clearfield. 
They became the parents of five sons and 



four daughters, as follows: Wava, wife of 
Lloyd McDowell, of Clearfield; Victor and 
Lloyd, residents of Clearfield; A. Clifford; 
Edgar, a traveling salesman, whose home is 
in DuBois, Pa. ; Sadie, the wife of Hugh Mul- 
ligan, of Clearfield ; Clayton, who is deceased ; 
and ,Vera and Mildred, residing at home. 

A. Clifford Hoover received his education 
in the country schools of Clearfield county 
and the public schools of the town of Clear- 
field, and during his boyhood days worked 
on the home farm. The life of an agricul- 
turist, however, did not appeal to him, his 
natural inclinations running toward mercan- 
tile pursuits, and at the age of twenty years 
he began to secure a business training as clerk 
in the store of Ernest Albert, of Woodland, 
Pa. By the year 1905 he had fitted himself 
to accept a position as manager with the 
Central Trading Company, and for a time 
was located at Winburne, in Clearfield county, 
but in 1910 was sent to Clymer, where he has 
since had charge of the company's interests. 
The store at Clymer is one of the firm's larg- 
est establishments, and its business has been 
materially increased under Mr. Hoover's able 
and progressive management. 

On May 6. 1909, Mr. Hoover was married, 
in the city of Pittsburg, to Mae Stewart, of 
Rathmel, Jefferson county, daughter of John 
and Etta (Thomas) Stewart, who are now 
residents of Jefferson county, where Mr. 
Stewart is interested in mining ventures; in 
his earlier years he gave his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits. Mr. and Mrs. Hoover have 
one daughter, Arlene. 

Mr. Hoover is primarily a business man and 
his duties demand the greater part of his 
attention, but he has not denied himself the 
companionship of his fellow men, and has in- 
terested himself to some extent in fraternal 
matters, being a popular member of Rathmel 
Lodge, No. 344, Knights of Pythias. He 
and Mrs. Hoover are members of the LTnited 
Brethren Church and are generally well liked 
in social circles dn Clymer. 

JOHN THEODORE SMITH, of Blacklick 
township, Indiana county, is one of the larg- 
est land owners of that township and exten- 
sively engaged in general agriculture and 
stock raising. He was born there, on the old 
Smith homestead, Nov. 3, 1851. 

The Smith family is of English origin. 
The founder in this country was James Smith, 
a native of Lancashire, England, who was 
born in 1800 and came to America when quite 
a young man ; making Ids way west of the 



964 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Allegheny mountaius he located in Blackliek 
township, Indiana Co., Pa., which was for- 
merl.y a part of Westmoreland county, and 
there became engaged in farming, owning a 
large tract of land located near Hopewell 
church. He died while still in the prime of 
young manhood, in 1833, at the early age of 
thirty-three years, and was buried in Hope- 
well cemetery. Although he died so young 
he had won a high reputation as a man of in- 
dustry and frugal habits, having worked hard 
to hew out a home in the wilderness. He mar- 
ried Mary Theresa Wainwright, who was born 
in England in 1802 and died in 1871, at the 
age of sixty-nine years. She was buried be- 
side her husband in Hopewell cemetei-y. Their 
children were : George, born in 1825 ; Wil- 
liam, born in 1827 ; Allie Retta, born in 1830, 
who married Isaac Hoover and (second) John 
George; Elizabeth, born in 1832, who mar- 
ried James Ferguson Badger, of Blackliek 
township, and Sarah, bom in 1834, who mar- 
ried Jesse M. Long. 

George Smith, son of James and Mary 
Theresa (Wainwright) Smith, was born in 
Blackliek township, on the Smith homestead, 
in 1825, and was only eight years old when 
his father died. But he was tenderly cared 
for by his devoted mother. His opportuni- 
ties for obtaining an education were limited, 
as in that early period schools were few and 
supported by subscription, and lasted only a 
few months in the year. He grew up on the 
farm, and being the eldest of the family had 
to assume responsibilities at an early age. 
When he reached manhood he took charge of 
the farm, a tract of 160 acres, and eventually 
bought out the interests of the other heirs. 
His home was originally a log dwelling house, 
but in time he made extensive improvements 
on the farm and became one of the prosper- 
ous men of his section, owning at one time 
over five hundred acres of land. He was 
noted for his industry and enterprise and 
progressive methods. He lived to the ripe 
age of eighty-three yeai-s, dying in 1908, and 
was buried in Hopewell cemetery. In poli- 
tics Mr. Smith was a Whig, later a Republi- 
can. He married Priscilla Chrow, a woman 
of strong Christian principles, who was noted 
for her devotion to home and family. She 
died in 1910, and was buried beside her hus- 
band. Their married life covered a period 
cf almost sixty years. Children as follows 
were born to them: William J., March 8, 
1850; John Theodore, Nov. 3, 1851; Sarah 



Eilen, who died young; Anna, who died 
j'oune ; and George, who died young. 

John Theodore Smith, son of George and 
Priscilla (Chrow) Smith, was educated in the 
school near the homestead. He worked from 
early boyhood on the farm with his 
and has all his life continued to 
farming. Wlien his father retired from ac- 
tive life he cared for him and his mother in 
their declining years, he and his wife making 
a home for them until they died. Since the 
death of his parents Mr. Smith has remained 
on the old place, carrying on farming and 
stock raising. He has become one of the larg- 
est land owners in Blackliek township, hav- 
ing over five hundred acres, and has made 
notable improvements on all the farms in his 
possession, erecting barns and other build- 
ings, and cultivating the soil according to the 
best modern ideas. He is one of the most 
practical agriculturists in his township, pos- 
sessing a keen knowledge of his chosen work 
and its requirements, and the results testify 
to the value of his methods. He is a great 
lover of cattle and horses, and as a. stock 
raiser has been decidedly successful. Mr. 
Smith's home and surroundings bespeak his 
artistic taste and interest in their proper 
maintenance. He is a man of public spirit 
and deeply interested in the general welfare, 
and is a strong supporter of the public school 
system, because he believes that patriotism 
and good citizenship are fostered in the 
schools. He has served as school director. 
Mr. Smith is a Republican of the Progressive 
kind, being a stanch admirer and supporter 
of Colonel Roosevelt's policies and the prin- 
ciples he advocates. He and his family are 
members of Hopewell M. E. Church, of which 
he is a trustee. He was a member of the 
building committee of the church. Mr. Smith 
has a genial disposition which has won for 
him a host of friends. 

Mr. Smith married April 11, 1877, in 
Blackliek township, Jennie Elder, a na- 
tive of Livermore, Westmoreland Co., Pa., 
daughter of John Elder, a descendant of one 
of the oldest families of western Pennsylvania. 
Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Smith : Graeie married Frank Keebler and 
lives in Westmoreland county; Maud resides 
at home; George is engaged at farming and 
lives at home; Robert Elder, a farmer in 
Blackliek township, married Myrtle Louella 
Swasy, daughter of John Swasy; Hazel, who 
lives at home, was educated in the district 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



965 



schools and State normal school, graduating 
from the latter, and taught school in Black- 
lick township. 

SAMUEL TRUBY RUGH, a well-known 
farmer of Brushvalley township, Indiana 
county, was born at Greenville, in Cherry- 
hill township, this county, April 1, 1876. 

Michael Rugh, grandfather of Samuel T. 
Rugh, was the son of Christian R. Rugh. He 
was born and raised in Burrell township, In- 
diana county, north of Blacklick, and re- 
mained there until 1853, when he removed 
with his family to Cass county, Ind., spend- 
ing one year in that location. He then went 
to ilacon county, 111., where he became a 
large land owner and a prosperous farmer, 
and lived the remainder of his life, his death 
occurring there. 

Samuel Rugh, father of Samuel T. Rugh, 
and second son of Michael Rugh, went to In- 
diana and Illinois with his father, but later 
returned to Greenville (Penn Run postoffice), 
where he engaged in the milling and mercan- 
tile business, being the owner of the Penn 
Run Flouring Mill. In 1880 he again went 
to Illinois, where he remained to the time of 
his death, which occurred when he was sixty- 
two years of age. Mr. Rugh married Mar- 
garet Truby, daughter of Simeon and Nancy 
Truby, of Meehanicsburg, and by her had 
three children: William, of Illinois; Edgar; 
and Samuel Truby. 

Samuel Truby Rugh, sou of Samuel and 
Margaret (Truby) Rugh, received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his district, and 
helped his grandfather, Simeon Truby, in 
the store until 1898, when he started out for 
himself. Buying a fai-m of 117 acres near 
by, he became engaged in general farming 
and stock raising, which he has ever since 
followed. He is now the owner of 300 acres 
of land, and his success as a farmer is due 
entirely to his own unceasing efforts and in- 
defatigable labor. He has shown excellent 
judgment in the conduct of his affairs and has 
become a valued citizen in his community. In 
politics long a Republican, he is a great ad- 
mirer of Colonel Roosevelt. He is quite active 
in educational work in his community, having- 
been a school director in his district for ten 
years. He has served four years as member 
of the council of Meehanicsburg borough. He 
is liberal in his church views, and is a broad- 
minded, energetic citizen, whose every effort 
is for the good of his community. 

On Jan. 19, 1898, Mr. Rugh was married 
to Annie McCrea, daughter of Gilbert T. and 



Jettrude M. (Stewart) McCrea, of Brashval- 
ley township, and they have had eight chil- 
dren, viz.: Margaret Blanche, John Truby, 
Jettrude McCrea, Cora Agnes, Gilbert Samuel 
(who died in infancy), Alma Elizabeth, Ethel 
Virginia and Samuel Clyde. 

JOSEPH A. HENDERSON, of Center 
township, Indiana county, comes of a family 
of Scotch-Irish extraction which was founded 
in America and Indiana county by Robert 
Henderson, his great-grandfather. The latter 
married Mary Ann Ralston. 

Robert Henderson, son of Robert and Mary 
Ann (Ralston) Henderson, was born Aug. 
l-t, 1782, in County Tyrone, Ireland, and was 
a youth of fifteen when he crossed the At- 
lantic with the rest of the family to make a 
home in the wilderness. He continued to live 
ill Conemaugh township, Indiana Co., Pa., 
throughout his active years, in his declining 
days making his home in the borough of Salts- 
burg, where he died in 1871, in his ninetieth 
year. He and his brother Joseph served as 
soldiers in the war of 1812. He married Fran- 
ces Graham, who was born in 1789, daughter 
of William and Frances Graham, and died in 
1864. Their children were : Mary Ann, who 
married Robert McMeans ; Eliza, who married 
James Carothers; Jane, who married D. K. 
Daugherty; Isabelle; Joseph A.; Margaret 
G., who married Rev. Andrew Getty ; Lucinda 
F. ; and Sarah R., who married John Long- 
will. 

•JJoseph A. Henderson, son of Robert and 
Frances (Graham) Henderson, was bom in 
3823 in Conemaugh township, where he grew 
to manhood. He followed teaming in his 
early life, later engaging in farming and lum- 
bering. During the winter months he hauled 
pine timber from the eastern part of the 
founty to Saltsburg. At this time he was 
living on the old Rose farm, a tract of 200 
acres. He was an energetic, thrifty man, and 
was on the road to prosperity at the time 
of his death, which occurred Feb. 25, 1863, 
when he was in his prime, but forty years old. 
He was thrown from a horse and received 
fatal injuries. A few months before, on June 
10, 1862, he had married Julia A. Wilson, 
a daughter of Daniel and Letitia Wilson, and 
their son Joseph A. was born after the father's 
death. Mrs. Henderson returned to her 
father's home in Conemaugh township, and 
some time later married (second) Joseph 
Pounds. 

Joseph A. Henderson was born April 21, 
1863, in Conemaugh township, Indiana county. 



966 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



and was reared by his maternal grandfather, 
Daniel Wilson, who then lived in Conemaugh 
township, at what was called "Wilson's Mills, 
on ]5ig run, later moving to Center township, 
to the Kee farm. The boy attended the pub- 
lie school in the neighborhood, at what is 
called the Lytle school. At the present writ- 
ing (1913) he still lives on his grandfather's 
old homestead, having 147 acres of land, where 
he is engaged in general farming and stock 
raising. 

j\Ir. Henderson cast his first vote for James 
G. Blaine, but some years ago changed his 
allegiance to the Prohibition party, being a 
strong advocate of temperance; he has been 
the Prohibitionist nominee for register and 
recorder of Indiana county. He has served 
two terms as school director of Center town- 
ship and four years as assessor. In religious 
faith he is a Presbyterian, he and his family 
belonging to Bethel Church. 

On June 10, 1886. ^Mr. Henderson mar- 
ried ^Margaret A. Harbison, daughter of Ed- 
ward and Rosanna Harbison, of Center town- 
ship, and the.v have had born to them three 
children, one dying in infancy; the two sur- 
vivors are Edward B. and Sarabel. 

WiLSOX. The Wilson family to which Mr. 
Henderson belongs in the maternal line is 
one of the oldest in Indiana county. Robert 
Wilson, its founder in this region, came from 
South Carolina in 1775, and settled in what 
is now called the "Loop," one mile below 
Livermore. He died in 1817. 

Roliert Wilson, one of the ten children of 
the Robert Wilson mentioned above, was born 
in 1768 in South Carolina and came with his 
parents to Indiana county. He married Anne 
McClellan. who was a native of Scotland, born 
in 1771, and eight children were born to 
them: James, who married Jane Barkley; 
Robert, who married Anne (Jraham ; John, 
who married Margaret Campbell ; Daniel, who 
is mentioned lielow : Joseph, who married 
Anne Douthet; and three daughters. 

Daniel Wilson, son of Robert and Anne 
(McClellan) Wilson, was born in 1809 in 
Conemaugh township, Indiana count.v, and 
there grew to manhood. In 1867 he moved 
to Center township, settling on the Kueer 
farm, where he spent the remainder of his 
life. He died Aug. 9, 1885, and was buried 
in the gi-aveyard of Bethel Presbyterian 
Church in Center township. Mr. Wilson w.is 
a leading worker in that church, which he 
served as elder, and was also a teacher and 
superintendent of the Sunday school. In 
politics lie was m-iirinally a Whig, later a 



Republican. He married Letitia Henderson, 
daughter of John Henderson, and they be- 
came the parents of eiglit children : Robert 
A. ; Lucy A. ; John A. ; Julia A. ; who married 
Joseph A. Henderson and (second) Joseph 
Pounds; Nancy Jane, who married Samuel 
Henry; Letitia E. and William D., twins, the 
latter marrying Nancy E. Campbell ; and Me- 
linda C, who married Robert 0. Allison. 

CHARLES BUTLER CAMPBELL COLE- 
MAN, a well-known agriculturist of Burrell 
township, for many years also had extensive 
interests as a dealer in hay. in which line he 
had business connections all over Indiana 
county. 

The Colemans .were in Indiana county 
among the earliest pioneer settlers, their asso- 
ciations with this region beginning before the 
period of the Revolution. In the early part 
of the year 1770 Nicholas Coleman, the 
founder of the family here, settled in Cone- 
maugh township, which was then a part of 
Westmoreland county. He was a native of 
Scotland, born in 1731, and emigrated to 
America when a young man. His first loca- 
tion was in the Conococheague valley, in 
Pennsylvania, where he married Jane ]\IcClel- 
land, a native of that valley. In 1773 they 
moved west of the Allegheny mountains, set- 
tling in what is now Conemaugh township, 
Indiana (then Westmoreland) county. Tak- 
ing up land, he built a log cabin in what was 
then a wilderness and located there in 1774 
or 1775. After he had done some clearing 
and sowed his second crop of wheat he was 
driven off by the Indians, and returned to 
the Conococheague valley, where he remained 
seven years before venturing to return to 
his land. He found that his cabin had been 
burned, the land that he had cleared was 
covered with a new growth of brush, and 
the various effects he had buried for safe 
keeping were missing — at any rate he never 
found them. But he set to work again to 
develop a farm from the primitive surround- 
ings, and spent the remainder of his life there, 
dying at liis home. His children were as fol- 
lows: William, born in 1774, died in 1851. 
married Mary Lytle, who was born in 1776 
and died in 1863; John, born April 9, 1776. 
died in 1865, married Martha Katon (he was 
a soldier in the war of 1812) ; Elizabeth mar- 
ried James ]\Iatthews ; i\Iargaret married John 
Matthews and (second) James Oliver; Mary 
married Samuel Craven ; Nancy married Moses 
Thompson ; Jane married Alexander jMc- 
Gaughey ; Archibald is mentioned below : Rol)- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



967 



ert married Elizabeth McLain (he served in 
the war of 1812) ; Sarah was next in the fam- 
ily; James, born in 1795, died in 1857, mar- 
ried Mai-y Campbell. 

Archibald Coleman, son of Nicholas, was 
born in Conemaugh township, Indiana (then 
Westmoreland) county, and there grew to 
manhood. He served as a soldier in the war 
of 1812. He became an extensive land owner 
and farmer in his native to\\Tiship, owning 
a tract of over five hundred acres there, upon 
which he made improvements and spent all 
his life. He died on his farm in 1870, and 
was buried in the cemetery of the Conemaugh 
Church. In politics he was a Whig and a 
Republican in turn, and in religious connec- 
tion he belonged to the United Presbyterian 
Church, of which lie was a leading member, 
serving as one of the ruling elders. He mar- 
ried Margaret Jamieson, whose father was a 
minister of the Associate Presbyterian 
Church, and she lived to the ripe age of 
ninety-four years, dying in 1884. Six children 
were born to their marriage : John G., who 
married Elizabeth Tajior; Archibald; Jane, 
who married William Bruce ; Nancy, who 
married Hon. William Irwin; James M., 
who married a IMiss Moore: and William J., 
who married a Margaret Nesbitt. 

Archibald Coleman, son of Archibald and 
Margaret (Jamieson) Coleman, was bom on 
the Coleman farm and there passed his early 
life. He was given a good practical edi;ca- 
tion and became a well-read man for his 
day. At the age of twenty-five he left his 
native township and went to Blacklick town- 
ship, settling on the ^Michael Campbell farm, 
a part of the tract once owned by Gen. Charles 
Campbell. This farm comprised 360 acres, 
upon which ]\Ir. Coleman put up a fine resi- 
dence in 1869, also erecting barns and other 
buildings. He had extensive farming inter- 
ests, in connection with which he established a 
large business as a dealer in hay and grain, 
he and his son Charles being associated in 
that line, shipping to Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington and New York and as far south 
as Florida. Their shipments often ran as 
high as three hundred carloads a year, and 
the.v were among the best-known men in the 
trade. Some twelve or fifteen years before 
his death he removed from his farm to Blairs- 
ville, where he built a home and spent the re- 
mainder of his life, dying there April 17, 
1885. He is buried in Blairsville cemetery. 
A man well known for his high character and 
many sterling ciualities, he was greatly re- 
spected. He was a member of the U. P. 



Church of Blairsville and quite active in 
all its work, serving as ruling elder. In poli- 
tics he was a stanch Republican. 

Mr. Coleman was married in what was then 
Blacklick (now Burrell) township to Mary 
Alice Campbell, who was bom in what is 
now Burrell township, daughter of Michael 
and Elizabeth (Ramsey) Campbell and grand- 
daughter of Gen. Charles Campbell. She 
died shortly before her husband, on Feb. 14, 
1885, and is buried by his side in Blairsville 
cemetery. Mrs. Coleman was a sincere Chris- 
tian woman, a devout member of the U. P. 
Church, and interested in all good works. 
She and her husband were the parents of 
five children: Michael, who died young; 
Archibald IMcClelland, who resided in Los 
Angeles, Cal., for some time, and recently re- 
turned to his old home, on Nov. 25, 1912, 
purchasing 115 acres of the old homestead in 
Burrell township, where he expects to remain ; 
Alice, who married Dr. Arthur DeVoe, and 
lived in Seattle, Wash., dying Jan. 8, 1887 
(she is buried at Blairsville, Pa.) ; Charles 
Butler Campbell; and Margaret, who died 
in infancy. 

Charles Butler Campbell Coleman was born 
Aug. 14. 1854, on his father's farm in Bur- 
rell township, formerly the Campbell farm. 
He obtained his education in the local public 
schools and at Blairsville academy and the 
Millersville State normal school, in Lancaster 
county. After leaving school he remained on 
the home place engaged in farming, and also 
became interested in the hay and grain trade 
with his father, their business being conducted 
under the firm name of A. Coleman & Son. 
He followed that line for over fifteen years 
in partnership with his father, and after the 
latter 's decease continued in it alone until 
1898, when he gave it up to devote all his 
time to the insurance business. He lived on 
the homestead and cultivated a tract of 210 
acres. In 1889 the fine barn which his father 
built was destroyed by lightning and Mr. 
Coleman has replaced it with a fine modern 
structure, besides making other improvements 
about the house and the fami. His sur- 
roundings show his artistic taste and neat- 
ness, the whole property being kept in model 
condition and giving evidence of his pro- 
gressive ideas and enterprise in putting them 
into execution. In addition to his farm work 
Mr. Coleman engages in the insurance busi- 
ness, having for over twenty years been the 
representative in Indiana and Westmore- 
land counties of the Equitable Life Insurance 
Company of New York. He has also been 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



active in the local public government, having 
served as member of the council and board 
of health for several years while a resident 
of the borough of Blairsville. In politics he 
is a Republican of the Progressive type. He 
is a member of the Presbyterian Church at 
Blairsville. 

On March 10, 1885, Mr. Coleman married 
Isabelle P. Cummins, who w5s born at Elder- 
ton, Armstrong Co., Pa., daughter of Wil- 
liam Cummins and sister of Dr. R. B. Cum- 
mins, a well-known dentist of Blairsville. 
They have had two children: Alice, who 
received her education in the public schools 
of Burrell township and Pittsburg, and at 
Blairsville College; and Archie Byron, who 
was educated in the public schools of Pitts- 
burg and high school at Blairsville. Mr. Cole- 
man and his family reside in Pittsburg dur- 
ing the winter season. Jlrs. Coleman is, like 
her husband, a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. 

Campbell. The Campbell family, from 
which Mr. Coleman is descended in the ma- 
ternal line, is of Scotch extraction, and his 
branch was founded in Indiana county, Pa., 
by Gen. Charles Campbell, who was born in 
1742 in the Conocoeheague valley in Penn- 
sylvania. His parents were of Scotch descent, 
but came to this country from Ireland. Gen- 
eral Campbell came to what is now Burrell 
township, Indiana Co., Pa., about 1772, locat- 
ing on Blacklick creek, where he erected what 
are still known as Campbell's mills, now owned 
by Andrew P. Baker. "A scant record exists 
of his captivity among the Indians and Brit- 
ish." He and "five others of the early set- 
tlers were captured by the Indians and held 
as prisoners for five years." He became a 
large land owner, having possessions on both 
sides of Blacklick creek, and was one of the 
best-known men of his day in the county, tak- 
ing a leading and active part in its develop- 
ment. The positions of trust and responsi- 
bility which he held in the county and on 
the frontier line indicate in some degree the 
estimation in which he was held by tlie citi- 
zens and State authorities. He was noted for 
his military prowess, having had honorable 
and useful connection with the militia of tlie 
county and district ; it is not positively known 
whether he did or did not take part in the 
Revolution. He died in 1828, when over 
eighty years old, respected by all who knew 
him. He was a leading member of the Bethel 
Presbyterian Church and for some years one 
of the ruling elders. By his first wife, Mar- 
garet Clark, he had twelve children: Bar- 



bara, wife of James McLain; Michael; Re- 
becca, wife of Samuel Denniston ; Sarah, wife 
of Fullerton Woods ; Mary, wife of John Den- 
niston; Jane, wife of Dr. Jonathan French; 
James, who married Amy Howard ; Margaret, 
who married Abram Spears; Tennwell, wife 
of Robert Doty; Eliza, wife of Alexander 
Spears; Charles, who married Matilda Hen- 
derson and (second) Mary Cummins; and 
Thomas, who married Elizabeth Fair. After 
the death of his wife ilargaret, Mr. Camp- 
bell married Mrs. Elizabeth Ramsey, widow 
of Maj. William Ramsey. She died in 1821. 

We quote the following from an old ac- 
count: "Mrs. Mary (Cummins) Campbell 
had several teaspoons over one hundred years 
old, that were used by General Campbell. Ma- 
tilda, daughter of late Charles Campbell, has 
General Campbell's gold watch; this is a 
unique specimen of old mechanism. It is 
marked 'M. and A. No. 5106.' " 

Michael Campbell, son of Gen. Charles 
Campbell, was born in what is now Burrell 
township and there grew to manhood. He 
became engaged in farming and stock raising, 
o^vning a large acreage in Burrell township, 
and died there in 1833. To him and his wife 
Elizabeth Ramsey, daughter of Maj. William 
and ]\Iary (Potter) Ramsey, were born ten 
children : Charles Butler, born Aug. 25, 1807, 
died Aug. 30, 1863 : James Ramsey, born Jan. 
17, 1809, died Oct. 7, 1880 ; Elizabeth Ramsey, 
born Jan. 26, 1811, died June 5, 1872, mar- 
ried Absalom Woodward; Michael, born Feb. 
20, 1813, died in Ohio, in 1836; Margaret 
Clark, born April 18, 1815, married Porter 
Turner; Thomas, born March 8, 1819, died 
June 6, 1886, in Villisca, Iowa, married Eliza- 
beth J. Wilson; Sarah Jane, bom June 17, 
1821, married Thomas Wilson, and died in 
June, 1853 ; Mary Alice, born June 17, 1823, 
married June 17, 1846, Archibald Coleman; 
John Ramsey, .born Oct. 26, 1826, died Jan. 
2, 1884, married Agnes Jane Hill April 11, 
1853 ; George Washington, bom Sept. 1, 1828, 
married Sarah Giberson, and died at Peabody, 



JAMES A. McQUOWN. .iustiee of the 
peace, ex-count.v conunissioner of Indiana 
county, and farmer of Grant township, was 
born in Rayne township, Indiana Co., Pa- 
Sept. 24. 1847, son of William and Margaret 
(Shields) ]\IcQuown. 

David McQuown, the great-grandfather of 
James A. McQuown, was born in Ireland, 
and came to the United States in young man- 
hood, locating in Westmoreland county. Pa.. 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



969 



where he was one of the pioneer settlers. He 
married a daughter of John Harris, the 
founder of Harrisburg, and spent the rest 
of his life in Westmoreland county, where his 
death occurred. 

Lawrence McQuown, son of David Mc- 
Quown, and grandfather of James A. Mc- 
Quown, was born in 1777 in Westmoreland 
county, and there grew to manhood on the old 
homestead place. He enlisted from West- 
moreland county in the American army dur- 
ing the war of 1812. In 1827 he came to 
Indiana county and settled in Eayne town- 
ship, where he engaged in farming and stock 
raising, continuing to work faithfully and in- 
dustriously making a home for his family un- 
til he passed away there, when fifty-three 
years of age, in 1830. He was a Whig in 
his political views and a faithful member of 
the Presbyterian Church, and was buried in 
the old Washington cemetery in Rayne town- 
ship. Mr. McQuown married Mary Cham- 
bers, and they had a family of thirteen chil- 
dren, as follows: Nancy, who married Wil- 
liam Fox; David, who married Isabella Bor- 
land ; Jane, who married Robert Daugherty ; 
John, who mai-ried Hannah Walls; James, 
who married Jane McQuown ; Ellen, who mar- 
ried Alexander Downey; Lawrence, who mar- 
ried Susannah J. Robinson ; Thomas, who mar- 
ried Ann M. Robinson; Margaret, who mar- 
ried John Elder ; William, the father of James 
A. McQuown; Mary, who married William 
Black; Eliza, who married James Bash; and 
Samuel, who married Keziah Snyder. 

William McQuown, son of Lawrence Mc- 
Quown, and father of James A. McQuown, 
was born in 1825, in Rayne township, Indiana 
Co., Pa., and there attended the district 
schools and grew to manhood. Reared to 
agricultural pursuits, he early engaged in 
farming in his native township, but later 
moved to Bast Mahoning township, where he 
continued to carry on operations on rented 
property. In 1862 he came to Grant town- 
ship and settled down to farming on a forty- 
five-acre tract which he purchased from Cal- 
vin Young, and there erected a frame house 
and continued to farm for some years. In 
his later life he moved to Franklin, Venango 
county, where he was an officer of the court 
under Judge Creswell until 1903, resigning 
at that time because of advancing age. He 
died in Franklin, May 16, 1905, aged eighty 
years, and was buried in the Franklin ceme- 
tery. He was first a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, bvit later transferred 
his membership to the Presbyterian. In polit- 



ical matters Mr. McQuown was a Whig and 
later a Republican, and while a resident of 
Grant township served in the capacity of 
overseer. During the Civil war he enlisted 
in Company E, 67th Regiment, P. V. I., 
under Col. Harry White, and in the battle 
of Winchester was captured by the Confed- 
erates. He was subsequently confined in 
Libby prison, and before he was finally dis- 
charged had become greatly emaciated from 
his sufferings. On his release he was trans- 
ferred to Company G, Veteran Reserve Corps, 
and while in the .line of duty some time later 
was hurt in a railroad accident, receiving a 
severe injury to his arm. He left the serv- 
ice with a record for bravery and faithful 
devotion to duty, and with the respect alike 
of his comrades and officers. 

Mr. McQuown was married to Margaret 
Shields, daughter of Col. William Shields, of 
the State militia, and she passed away at 
the home of her son in Clearfield county. 
Mr. and Mrs. McQuown became the parents 
of the following children : James A. ; Annie 
M., who married John Potts, and resides at 
Punxsutawney ; William W., who married 
Susan Shaffer, and lives at Mahaffey, Clear- 
field county; Hon. Martin Luther, ex-State 
senator, former superintendent of schools of 
Clearfield county, and now editor of the Rafts- 
men's Journal, at Clearfield, who married Vir- 
ginia Flegel ; Emma, who married Robert Mc- 
Garvey, and resides at Gazzam, Pa. ; and Nina, 
who married George Edmondson and resides 
at Indiana, Pennsylvania. 

James A. McQuown, son of William Mc- 
Quown, attended the public schools of Rayne 
and East Mahoning townships, and worked 
on his father 's farm until he was sixteen years 
of age, at which time he enlisted in Company 
C, 11th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantiy, un- 
der Colonel Richard Coulter and Captain 
Schall, Feb. 29, 1864, and served until the 
close of the war. At the battle of the Wilder- 
ness, May 6, 1864, he was wounded in the right 
side by a minie ball, and sent to the hospital. 
In September, 1864, he was discharged there- 
from and rejoined his regiment, succeeding 
which he participated in the battles of Hatch- 
er's Run, Boydton Plank Road, Gravelly 
Run and Five Forks, and was present at the 
surrender of General Lee, at Appomattox. 
Following this he was stricken with intermit- 
tent fever and was confined in the hospital at 
Washington, D. C, but managed to be dis- 
charged therefrom in time to Avitness the 
grand review. On being mustered out of the 
service, Ma,y 31, 1865, he returned to his 



970 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



home, and almost at once took up the carpen- 
ter's trade with Peter Beer, following that 
occupation for some time in Jefferson and 
Clearfield counties. In 1876 ]\Ir. McQuown 
went to the oil fields, where he was engaged 
in working at his trade. In 1868 he pur- 
chased his present property, a tract of sixty 
acres, on which he erected a round log cabin 
in the woods. Since 1878 he has given his 
time and attention to farming and his ven- 
tures have proved eminently satisfactory. 
From time to time he has made valuable im- 
provements on his land, which is now con- 
sidered one of the valuable tracts in his 
township, and his substantial buildings, his 
well-graded fields and his sleek, well-fed cat- 
tle, all testify to the presence of able man- 
agement, thrift and industry. 

Mr. McQuowu was a Republican until the 
year 1880, at which time he cast his fortunes 
with the Greenback party, and on that ticket 
was elected county commissioner, his col- 
leagues being James Johnson, of Center town- 
ship, and William Mabon, of East Mahoning 
township. During his administration several 
county bridges were built, including the stone 
arch bridge at Kelleysburg, which cost $1,200 
and is still in a good state of preservation, 
not having cost the county one dollar for 
repairs up to the present time. At this time 
Mr. JIcQuown is independent in his political 
views. In 1902 he was elected justice of the 
peace, receiving his commission from Governor 
Stone, and in 1907 was reelected and received 
his commission from Governor Pennypacker, 
his present term expiring in 1914. He is a 
popular comrade of Frank Brown Post. No. 
266, Grand Army of the Republic, at Rich- 
mond, and his religious belief is that of the 
Christian Church. He has always labored 
faithfully in behalf of the welfare of his com- 
munity, and has been the incumbent of many 
offices. For fifteen years he was a member 
of the school board, and during that time at 
different periods served as president, secre- 
tary and treasurer ; for twenty-eight years he 
was .iudge and inspector of election; and he 
has also served as auditor, township clerk and 
assessor. Although a man of pronounced 
vie^ys as to what constitutes right and wrong, 
he is always fair and unbiased in his official 
decisions, and respects the rights and opinions 
of others. He is domestic in his tastes and 
temperate in hi.s habits, a public-spirited citi- 
zen, an excellent official, and a whole-souled, 
generous man, who has succeeded in his own 



life and is ready at all times to assist others 
to success. 

On Aug. 14, 1869, James A. McQuown was 
married to Mary J. Shankle, who was born in 
Cherryhill township, Indiana Co., Pa., daugh- 
ter of Elias and Susan (Ayers) Shankle. old 
settlers of Cherryhill township. Nine chil- 
dren have been born to this union, as follows : 
Harry E., a farmer of White township, mar- 
ried Clara Gardner; Ada M. married Willis 
J. Farnsworth, a farmer of Grant township ; 
Martin Luther, residing at Decker's Point, 
married Rose Riethmiller; James Ernest, a 
farmer of East Mahoning township, married 
Jlinnie Rorabaugh ; Charles resides at home ; 
Hazel Virginia, a graduate of the Summer 
normal school and Purchase Line academy, is 
now a public school teacher; Murray Clif- 
ford resides at Dixonville: Paul V. was edu- 
cated in the public schools and summer nor- 
mal school, and has been a teacher in Grant, 
Montgomery, Banks and Canoe townships ; 
Ted is engaged in farming and resides at 
home. Murraj^ C. and Ted McQuown are 
members of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

A. J. WEIR ROBINSON, a farmer and 
stock raiser of Conemaugh township, was born 
in that township Aug. 14, 1856, son of James 
W. Robinson. 

John Robinson, his grandfather, married 
Mary Weir as his first wife, and second Jane 
Marshall. Of the first union three sons were 
born : Robert W., who married Jane Ritchey, 
of Indianapolis, Ind. ; Adam, who married 
Mary Foster, and lived in Westmoreland 
county, where he followed fanning ; and James 
W. Of the second union, there were four 
sons and five daughters, as follows : John M., 
William I\r., Samuel S.. Thomas W., Jennie 
S., Rachel. Jane, Eliza M. and Maria W. 

James W. Robinson, father of A. J. Weir 
Robinson, was born Feb. 21, 1803, and died 
Feb. 4. 1865. He married Rebecca Weir, 
of Pigeon Creek. Washington Co.. Pa., who 
was born in 1813 and died in 1895, and both 
are buried in Edgewood cemeteiy, at Salts- 
burg. They were the parents of six children : 
Sarah M., born Oct. 30. 1834. died unmarried; 
Rebecca J., born Sept. 25, 1836, married Rev. 
W. W. Woodend, D. D., a Presbyterian min- 
ister, and is deceased; INIartha E., boni June 
30, 1839, married Rev. S. J. Berlin, a Luth- 
eran preacher, and both are deceased ; Wil- 
liam Thomas, born April 27. 1841, served in 
the Union army during the Civil war. hav- 
ing enlisted in 1863. and died in 1865 ; Ella 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



971 



M., boru Sept. 13, 1849, died unmarried; A. 
J. Weir is mentioned at length below. 

James W. Robinson was reared on his 
father's homestead in Conemaugh township, 
and there spent his useful life. In time he 
became the owner of 200 acres of fertile land, 
and having learned agriculture from the in- 
itial steps pursued that calling all his life 
with very satisfactory results, branching out 
until he became an extensive stockman, rais- 
ing cattle and horses that were recognized as 
the best in this part of the State, all of blooded 
stock. In 1833 he erected a substantial and 
comfortable residence, now the property of 
his son A. J. Weir Robinson, and remodeled 
it in 1859. In addition he put up barns and 
other outbuildings to correspond, and took 
a pride in keeping his premises in excellent 
order. Although he died before many mod- 
ern inventions came upon the market, he took 
advantage of the assistance offered by those 
of his day, and his farm was a model for his 
neighbors. 

Early recognizing the importance and neces- 
sity of good roads, he advocated improving 
the public highways, and after the office was 
created was one of the first men to serve as 
road supervisor. While always active in town- 
ship affairs he did not desire office, but pre- 
ferred to use his influence in his private capac- 
ity. Generous and consistent as a member of 
the Presbyterian Church, his devotion was re- 
warded by his election as elder, but he de- 
clined the honor, declaring he felt that with 
the numerous duties resting upon him as a 
farmer and business man he could not do jus- 
tice to the office. During the years of his 
mature life, he kept the interests of Cone- 
maugh township close to his heart and when 
he died this locality lost one of its best and 
most representative citizens. Devoted to his 
home and family he found his pleasures in 
the circle of his relatives, and was deeply 
mourned when death claimed him. 

A. J. Weir Robinson, son of James W. 
Robinson, was brought up in his native town- 
ship, and early taught the habits of industry 
and economical management that have aided 
him in his more than ordinarily successful 
career. During his boyhood he attended the 
Robinson district school, No. 1, and later for 
two terms went to the old Saltsburg academy. 
Being only nine years old when he lost his 
father, he owes his careful training to his 
good mother. He assisted with the work at 
home until seventeen years of age. and then, 
although young for the responsibilities, took 
charge of the farm, then consisting of 200 



acres, and has since continued to carry on his 
agricultural interests, although at times he 
has branched out in other directions. His 
farm is one of the finest in Conemaugh town- 
ship, and he devotes it to general farming and 
stock raising, conducting his operations ac- 
cording to advanced methods, for he is a 
firm believer in scientific agriculture. His 
property is well supplied with modern machin- 
ery and he takes advantage of governmental 
experiments to aid him in his work. His resi- 
dence is the one built by his father in 1833, 
and rebuilt in 1859, and Mr. Robinson has 
added much to its original equipment in the 
way of comforts, having a very desirable 
home. His barns are thoroughly up-to-date 
in every respect, and it would be difficult to 
find any agriculturist of Indiana county who 
has a better equipment all through than Mr. 
Robinson. 

In 1898 Mr. Robinson built a butcher shop 
near his residence and went into the whole- 
sale and retail meat business which he carried 
on until the spring of 1912, when he retired. 
At one time he operated several butcher 
wagons, which carried meat about the town- 
ship. Mr. Robinson drilled a well one hun- 
dred feet deep, and pumps this bountiful sup- 
plj' by the Kewanee system to his house, barns 
and outbuildings. When the Eldersridge 
and West Lebanon Telephone Company was 
organized- he was one of its promotors and 
foundei-s, and carries a large amount of its 
stock. The Saltsburg' Presbyterian Church 
has in him a warm supporter, and for the 
last twenty-eight years he has been one of 
its trustees, and for eight years has been an 
elder. From 1883 to 1898 he rendered val- 
iiable service as a school director, has been 
township assessor for the past ten years, and 
like his father has always been deeply inter- 
ested in the welfare of the township and the 
betterment of its conditions. 

On Feb. 16, 1882, Mr. Robinson married 
Eva L. Guthrie, daughter of William and 
Eliza M. (Robinson) Guthrie, of Dayton, 
Armstrong Co., Pa. One daughter has been 
born of this union, Ella Maud, boni Feb. 16, 
1883, who is at home, a most charming young 
lady. Mrs. Robinson presides over her home 
delightfully, and she and her daughter en- 
tertain hospitably, liaving drawn about them 
a congenial circle. 

WADDLE. The Waddle family is counted 
among the old established residents of Penn- 
sylvania, dating back to Colonial days, and 
its representatives have been prominent fac- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



tors in the maintenance of peace and the de- 
velopment of the natural resources of their 
country. 

James Waddle, grandfather of Samuel and 
James Elmer Waddle, was born in West- 
moreland county, near Loyalhanna, and died 
in that locality, being interred with his three 
wives in the cemetery at the Loyalhanna 
Church, in Westmoreland county. James 
Waddle was married first to Anna Burns, who 
became the mother of the following children : 
Frank, William, John, James, Samuel, Mar- 
tha, Mary, Margaret, Jane and Sarah. He 
was a farmer, operating extensively on a large 
tract of land, and was one of the leading agri- 
culturists of Westmoreland county in his day. 

Samuel Waddle, son of James Waddle and 
father of Samuel and James Elmer Waddle, 
was born near Loyalhanna, Westmoreland 
Co., Pa., in 1818, and died in 1894. In 1846 
he came to Indiana county, settling in Cone- 
maugh township, where he bought the salt 
works on the Osprey tract from a Mr. Ral- 
ston, as well as the farm known as the Thomas 
Reed property. This latter was one and a 
half miles from ^7hat was then known as 
Kelly's station, now Tunnelton. Here he 
continued to manufacture salt and operate 
his farm for the remainder of his life, although 
the last ten years he lived somewhat retired 
from arduous work. Although interested in 
the development and advancement of his town- 
ship and county, he did not take an active 
part in politics, for he was a retiring man, 
happiest when at home with his family. The 
Baptist Church at Tunnelton held his mem- 
bership and received his generous support. 
At his death he was laid to rest in the Salts- 
burg cemetery. 

Samuel Waddle married IMartha Smith, 
daughter of William and Elizabeth (Ander- 
son) Smith, who now resides with her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Dick, in Conemaugh township. The 
following children were bom to Samuel Wad- 
dle and his wife : Anna Elizabeth, born Aug. 
30, 1845, is deceased ; Martha Ellen, born Dec. 
22, 1847, married Michael F. Dick, and had 
children Roy and Roxie, the former being in 
charge of the farm; Mary C, born April 29, 
1850, married J. H. Lyttle; John A., bora in 
July, 1853, married Mary Badger, and is a 
farmer of Westmoreland county; Samuel is 
mentioned below; Frank E., born Dec. 13. 
1859, married Matilda Patent, and died March 
11, 1892; William S., born June 2, 1862, mar- 
ried Sarah Wiuings, and is a farmer of Derry 
township; James Elmer is mentioned below. 

Samuel, W.vddle, son of Samuel Waddle 



and grandson of James Waddle, was born 
May 28, 1857, in Conemaugh township, Indi- 
ana Co., Pa. He grew up in the locality, re- 
ceiving his educational training in the local 
schools, and taught habits of industry and 
thrift by his parents, while living at home 
and assisting his father in the salt works and 
on the farm. In 1881, after he had attained 
to his majority, Mr. Waddle bought the old 
John Kelly farm of 131 acres, which he has 
devoted to general farming and stock raising. 
Later he purchased a sixty-acre tract in West- 
moreland county and operated it for many 
years, but sold it finally to the Keystone Coal 
Company. The Waddle homestead is beau- 
tifully situated on the Conemaugh river near 
Tunnelton, and it is well improved, Mr. Wad- 
dle having erected a comfortable residence, 
commodious barn and other outbuildings, as 
well as installed numerous modern conveni- 
ences that aid him in the conduct of his 
operations. 

Samuel Waddle married Ida Anna Dixon. 
daughter of Joseph and Martha (Pierce) 
Dixon, of Conemaugh township. Mr. and 
Mrs. Waddle are the parents of seven chil- 
dren : Edward Ray, born in April, 1887, died 
in November, 1910, and is buried in Saltsburg 
cemetery; Floraf M. attended the Indiana 
normal school, was gi-aduated from the Cline 
noi-mal school and is now a teacher, having 
taught two terms at Tunnelton and being now 
engaged at Salina, Pa. ; Phyllis IM. taught 
two terms of school at Tunnelton and is now 
teaching at Avonmore, Westmoa-eland Co., 
Pa.; Adella Ruth is now attending normal 
school at Indiana town ; Susan Martha, How- 
ard Samuel and Ethel Elizabeth are at home. 

A strong Democrat, Mr. Waddle has taken 
an intelligent interest in polities in his neigh- 
borhood, serving capably as township auditor 
for three years, supervisor for six years, and 
school director for six years. The Presby- 
terian Church holds his membership, and he 
served it for an extended period as trustee. 
A thoi-oughly reliable man and public-spirited 
citizen, Mr. Waddle has not only attained to 
well-merited prosperity, but has given his 
community faithfully service extending over 
many years, which is appreciated by his fel- 
low citizens. 

James Elmer Waddle, son of the elder 
Samuel Waddle, was born May 29, 1865, in 
Conemaugh township, Indiana Co., Pa. Grow- 
ing up amid the iisual surroundings of a 
country boy of his day and community, Mr. 
Waddle attended school in district No. 9. 
While going to school, his youthful energies 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



973 



were employed at the salt works owned by 
his father and in tasks about the fai*m. After 
attaining to his majority, Mr. Waddle be- 
came interested along several lines of en- 
deavor before devoting himself to farming 
and stock raising. For a number of years 
he conducted a large general store at Tunnel- 
ton, and when the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company was doing its new grading in 1907, 
Mr. Waddle was superintendent for C. A. 
Sims & Co., who held the contract for the 
work. After his father's death Mr. Waddle 
bought out the other heirs and now owns the 
old Waddle homestead of nearly two hundred 
acres, on which he carries on general farm- 
ing and I'aises stock. He also is a heavy stock 
buyer and dealer, shipping to Pittsburg. 
Owing to his experience and the extent of his 
operations, Mr. Waddle is known all over the 
county as an expert on cattle, and his opin- 
ions are respected in relation to this line, of 
work. 

James Elmer Waddle was married to Mar- 
garet Elizabeth Elrick, daughter of Robert 
and Jane (Anderson) Elrick. Mrs. Waddle 
was born near Social Hall, Westmoreland 
Co., Pa., but later lived at Lewisville, in 
Conemaugh township, Indiana Co., Pa. Mr. 
and Mrs. Waddle are the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: Carrie Irene, born Nov. 
21, 1887, married Clyde Lowman, son of 
Squire Hugh Lowman, and their children are 
Olive Gayle and Genevieve; Mary Bell, born 
March 14, 1890, married Dr. William Johns, 
of Mechanicsburg, Brushvalley township (she 
attended the Indiana normal and taught 
school for three terms in Conemaugh town- 
ship and one term in Saltsburg) ; Olive Mar- 
guerite was born Nov. 9, 1892; Velma Jane, 
Sept. 12, 1895 ; Arthur James, Feb. 7, 1898 ; 
Marion Elrick, Oct. 8, 1900; Samuel Paul, 
Feb. 22, 1903 ; Helen Elizabeth, April 14, 1906, 
and William Keneth, March 17, 1912. Olive 
and Velma graduated from the Saltsburg high 
school in 1911, and Velma is now attending 
school at Mechanicsburg. 

Having virtually spent his life in Cone- 
maugh township, Mr. Waddle is naturally in- 
terested in local affairs and has given time 
and money to improve conditions. For nine 
years he rendered efficient service as super- 
visor of roads, and has often been selected as 
judge or inspector of elections. 

The name of Waddle has long stood for in- 
tegrity of purpose and uprightness of living 
and those who bear it now are living fully up to 
the high standards raised by those who have 
gone before. They are proud of their family 



and what its members have accomplished, and 
are earnest in their endeavors to do nothing 
to take from its prestige. 

SAMUEL A. KRIDER, who is in the grain 
business at Starford, Indiana Co., Pa., where 
he operates a flour and feed mill, was born 
in Center county. Pa., Feb. 9, 1874, son of 
Rev. Samuel and Mary (Royer) Krider. 

John Krider, his grandfather, was bom in 
the eastern part of Pennsylvania and in early 
manhood came to Center county, where he 
established the family. He lived and died on 
his old farm there. 

Rev. Samuel Krider was born at Gatesburg, 
Center county, and was reared in that county. 
Up to the age of thirty years he was mainly 
engaged in teaching school, at that period 
of his life entering the ministry of the Lu- 
theran Church. Enlisting in the army at 
the age of eighteen, in September, 1861, he 
was discharged at the expiration of his term, 
in the j^ear 1864. He belonged to Company 
E, 45th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, 
and took part in the following engagements: 
James Island, S. C. ; Fort Pulaski, Falmouth, 
Va.; South Mountain, Md. ; Antietam; Fred- 
ericksburg, Va. ; Jamestown, Ky. ; Vicks- 
burg, Miss. ; Jackson, Miss. ; Cumberland Gap, 
Md. ; Blue Springs, Ky. ; Campbell Station, 
Ky. ; Knoxville, Ky. ; Wilderness, Va. ; Cold 
Harbor, Va., and Spottsylvania, Va. He was 
wounded at Spottsylvania courthouse in the 
left arm and wrist, in October, 1864. After 
the war he taught school for nine years and 
then entered Susquehanna University, at 
Selinsgrove, graduating in 1884. He received 
his first call to Turtle Creek, Allegheny Co., 
Pa., where he was stationed for three years; 
his second charge was at Elderton, Armstrong 
Co., Pa., where he labored for several years, 
after which he was located seven years at 
Cookport, Indiana Co., Pa. ; next at Hoovers- 
ville, Somerset Co., Pa., two years; then at 
Portage, Cambria Co., Pa.; lived in Greens- 
burg a little over one year, but was not in 
active work while there; and lastly was at 
Johnstown, Pa., after which he retired. 

Mr. Krider married Mary Royer, who was 
born at Center Hill, Center Co., Pa., daughter 
of Samuel Royer, a native of Germany, who 
came to the United States and settled in Cen- 
ter county. Pa. He was a miller and eon- 
ducted what was known as the Red mill, in 
Center Hill. Three children were born to 
Rev. Samuel and Mary Krider, namely: 
Samuel A. ; John R., who died in 1904 ; and 



974 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Alva R., who is in the news and stationery- 
business at Johnstown. 

Samuel A. Krider attended public school 
in Green township, and afterward taught 
school at what is now called Union town (Ber- 
ringer post office). He then became a clerk 
in a business house at Johnstown and while 
in that town was connected with the Johns- 
town Daily Times. His first independent 
start in business was made in July, 1898, at 
Windber, Somerset Co., Pa., when he had a 
general store which he conducted only a 
short time. After quitting the store he be- 
came engaged with the Kirk Hardware Com- 
pany, in that same place, and was manager for 
a little over one year, after which he entered 
the employ of the Eureka Supply Company, as 
assistant bookkeeper. He was with that com- 
pany for over four years, during whjch time 
he attained the position of head bookkeeper, 
holding that position until the latter part of 
1904, when he resigned and returned to Indi- 
ana county, locating at Pleasant Valley. How- 
ever, during this time, in October, 1900, he 
entered into partnership with A. N. Buter- 
baugh, in the general mercantile business, in 
Windber, Mr. Buterbaugh taking charge per- 
sonally. The.v continued same until October, 
1904, when they moved their stock from there 
to Pleasant Valley, Indiana county, and car- 
ried on the business there until January, 1905, 
when they sold out to another party. At that 
time they started in the feed business in 
Starford, Pa., under the name of Buterbaugh- 
Krider Company, and continued that until 
1908, when Mr. Krider bought Mr. Buter- 
baugh 's interest. He has since conducted the 
business himself. He was one of the pioneer 
business men at Starford and has resided 
there ever since the town was started. 

Mr. Krider was married at Lovejoy, Dee. 
24, 1896, to Agnes P. Buterbaugh, daughter 
of A. N. Buterbaugh, whose father was one 
of the early settlers in Green township. Mrs. 
Krider is one of the following family : Harry 
R., who lives at Starford; Ollie, who is the 
wife of Thomas Fleming, of Windber; ]\Irs. 
Krider; J. H., who is manager of the Dixon 
Run Lumber Company, Starford, Pa. ; Louie, 
who is the wife of M. L. McQuown, of Jose- 
phine, Pa.; and Blair, deceased. Mr. and 
Mrs. Krider have two children, Beulah and 
Harry R. They belong to the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. Mr. Krider has some addi- 
tional business interests, and is a director of 
the Clymer National Bank. He is active in 
Masonry, belonging to the minor branches at 



Ebensburg; to the Consistory at Williamsport, 
and to the Mystic Shrine at Altoona. 

CAPT. JOHN KINTER has been one of 
the most prominent residents of Rayne town- 
ship, Indiana county, a leader in movements 
for the welfare of his locality and a public 
official whose services have lieen satisfactory 
in evei'y position to which he has been chosen. 
He was born Aug. 6, 1841, on the old Kinter 
homestead, in Washington township, now in- 
cluded in Rayne township, son of Isaac and 
Hannali (]Myers) Kinter, and is the last sur- 
viving member of their family. He still oc- 
cupies the old homestead — the third genera- 
tion of his family to live there. 

Philip Kinter, the first ancestor of this 
family in America, came to this country from 
Holland and settled in Huntingdon (now Cen- 
ter) county, Pa., at the headwaters of Spruce 
creek. He died in that county. He married 
Barljara King. 

John Kinter, son of Philip, served as a 
soldier in the Revolution, enlisting three times 
and serving two months on each call. He 
married Isabella Findley and they had eight 
children, among whom were Isaac, Henry and 
John. In 1808 he removed from Center coun- 
ty to what is now Rayne township, Indiana 
Co., Pa., settling near Kintersburg, which 
was named after him. He died aged eighty- 
two years, his wife living to the advanced age 
of ninety-one. One of their sons, Henry, 
served in the United States army during the 
war of 1812 and was at one time sheriff of 
Indiana county. 

John Kinter, son of John and Isabella 
(Findley), was bom in 1786, came to Indiana 
county in 1808, and died on a farm near the 
old homestead at the age of ninety-six years. 
His wife, Sarah (Ross), lived to the age of 
ninety. Their son, Isaac Kinter, born in Cen- 
ter county, Aug. 6, 1805, was the father of 
Capt. John Kinter. He was one of the fore- 
most citizens of this section in his day, serv- 
ing for years as township treasurer, was su- 
pervisor and school director, and for one term 
county auditor. He married Hannah Myers, 
and they had eight children, all now de- 
ceased but John; his last brother died in 
1912. The family have all been fighters and 
ready to give their services to their country, 
and three of the sons of Isaac Kinter served 
during the Civil war, John, D. M., and Peter 
('. ; D. M. Kinter was a first lieutenant in the 
6th Regiment, Missouri State militia (he be- 
came a minister of the Christian Church), and 
Peter C. Kinter became a member of Com- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



975 



pany I, 135th Pennsylvania Volunteer In- 
fantry, dying of typhoid fever Oct. 18, 1862, 
at Washington, D. C. 

John Kinter, son of Isaac, was reared to 
manhood on the homestead and followed farm- 
ing, which has been his occupation through- 
out life. On Aug. 7, 1862, the day after he 
reached the age of twenty-one, he enlisted in 
Company I, 135th Regiment, Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, which was assigned to 
the 1st Brigade, 3d Division, 1st Army Corps. 
In 1862 the regiment did guard duty and 
patrol service at Washington, D. C, and Mr. 
Kinter saw service at the battles of Chancel- 
lorsville and Fredericksburg. He was dis- 
charged in May, 1863, and again entered the 
service in March, 1865, this time .joining 
Company F, 74th Pennsylvania Volunteer In- 
fantry, as tirst lieutenant, and was subse- 
quently promoted to captain, sei-ving with 
that rank until discharged, Aug. 29, 1865. He 
was one of the scouting party that went out 
after Mosby. During his first enlistment he 
had served as drum major, and he still has 
the drum he carried. He is an honored mem- 
ber of John Pollock Post, G. A. R., and be- 
longs to the Park Veteran Military Band of 
Marion Center, Indiana county. 

At the close of his army service Captain 
Kinter returned to Indiana county and set- 
tled on the home farm in Rayne township, 
which he still cultivates. He has been a suc- 
cessful farmer and progressive in his ideas, 
supporting every movement which appeals to 
his judgment as effective for the advancement 
of the general welfare. He served two years 
as president of the Patrons Mutual Fire In- 
surance Company of Indiana County, and he 
has taken an active part in public affairs, 
serving the township as auditor, clerk and 
supervisor. He was at one time the nominee 
for sheriff, but failed of election. His polit- 
ical connection is with the Republican party. 

On May 21, 1868, Captain Kinter married 
Elizabeth Lingenfelter, who was born Oct. 
6, 1847, in Jefferson county, Pa., daughter of 
John and Catherine (Mauk) Lingenfelter. 
They have had a large family, seven of whom 
are still living, namely: Isaac W., a farmer 
of Rayne township, who married Sadie 
Wohlers, of that township; P. Watson, who 
is mentioned below; Mabel M., who lives at 
home; Elizabeth, who graduated at the Indi- 
ana normal school in June, 1913 ; John L.. 
an electrician ; Andrew R., an electrician ; and 
Martha, who graduated from the business 
college at Indiana, and is stenographer for 
the Penn-Mary Coal Company at Heilwood, 



Pa. Three sons and one daughter are de- 
ceased : Guy N., who died in 1902 ; D. Benton, 
who died in 1906, survived by his wife, Clara 
(Hines) and son Benton; Frank D., who died 
in 1912, leaving his wife, Lelia A. (Shields) ; 
and Laura B., who married Rev. H. S. Mc- 
Clintock, of Somerset, Pa., and died in 1904, 
leaving her husband and one child, Laura E., 
who lives with her grandfather, Captain Kin- 
ter. 

Captain Kinter and his wife are members 
of the Church of Christ, in which he was at 
one time quite an active worker, serving as 
deacon. 

P. Watson Kinter, best known as "Watt" 
Kinter, proprietor of the hotel at Chambers- 
ville, Indiana county, was born April 11, 
1873, at Kintersburg, this county, son of 
John and Elizabeth (Lingenfelter) Kinter. 
He attended the Shields school in Rayne town- 
ship. In his early life he worked in the 
woods for some time, peeling bark, and made 
a trip to the West, where he was employed at 
threshing and cow punching. In 1899 he 
bought a restaurant at Guthrie, Okla., which 
he carried on for one year. In February, 
1902, he became engaged as a plumber in 
St. Louis, Mo. On May 27, 1904, Mr. Kinter 
opened a hotel at Creekside, Indiana county, 
which he conducted for one year, at the end 
of that time buying the Chambersville hotel, 
to which he has since given all his attention. 
He is well adapted for the business, in which 
he has met with continued success, his estab- 
lishment being well patronized. Mr. Kinter 
is a member of the B. P. 0. Elks, and in 
politics he is a Republican. 

On June 1, 1904, he married Olive Cost, 
of Indiana, Pa., daughter of Joseph and Mary 
Elizabeth Cost, the former a plumber. Three 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Kin- 
ter, Joseph Watson, Mary Elizabeth and 
Ebcrt Paul. 

HARMON L. McCULLOUGH, M. D., phy- 
sician and surgeon at Cookport, Indiana Co., 
Pa., was born in Montgomery township, Indi- 
ana county, Aug. 29, 1853, and is a son of 
David and Rachel (Lovelace) McCullough. 

John McCullough, the Doctor's grand- 
father, spent his early life in Shelocta, Indi- 
ana county, but later moved to Clearfield 
county, settling in Bumside township, where 
he cleared a farm and spent the rest of his 
life in tilling the soil. 

David ^IcCullough, son of John and father 
of Dr. McCullough, was born in Shelocta, In- 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



diana Co., Pa., and was reared to agricultural 
pursuits, which he followed in Montgomei-y 
township for many years. In 1870 he moved 
to Cookport, and there his death occurred 
March 27, 1888. He married Rachel Love- 
lace, who was born in York county, Pa., and 
came to Indiana county with her sister when 
both were young- women, the other members 
of her family following some time later. She 
died Dec. 25, 1891, the mother of six children, 
four of whom lived to maturity : George W., 
who resides in Green township; Bruce, who 
Lives on the old homestead in Montgomery 
township ; Dr. Harmon L. ; and Samuel I., a 
merchant of Cookport. 

William Lovelace, the maternal grand- 
father of Dr. McCullough, was a native of 
York county, and there his entire life was 
spent in agricultural pursuits. 

Harmon L. McCullough 's boyhood was 
spent on the home farm in Montgomery town- 
ship, and there he attended the district schools. 
He was seventeen years of age when he ac- 
companied the family to Cookport, and shortly 
thereafter he entered the State normal school, 
at Indiana. Afterward he became a student 
in the Western Reserve School of Medicine, 
at Cleveland, Ohio, and there received his de- 
gree in 1883, immediately after which he es- 
tablished himself in practice in Cookport. He 
has built up a large professional business, 
and is widely known in the medical fraternity 
of Indiana county, as well as being prominent 
in financial circles as a director of the Sav- 
ings & Trust Company, of Indiana. 

Dr. McCullough has interested himself in 
promoting the cause of education, and dur- 
ing the last twenty years has been a member 
of the board of school directors of Green town- 
ship. His religious connection is with the 
Baptist Church. 

JAMBS DOWLER AKE now gives the 
greater part of his time to his farming and 
banking_ interests, but in his numerous busi- 
ness activities he has proved himself a man 
of varied resources in the success he has made 
of all his undertakings. He has had promi- 
nent connection with some of the important 
projects in this part of the State carried 
through to successful completion, and his ex- 
ecutive ability is recognized by all who have 
been associated with him. As a promoter of 
large enterprises he has aided notably in the 
progress and development of this region. 

Mr. Ake was born Dec. 11, 1853, at New 
Washington, Clearfield Co., Pa., son of Jacob 
G. and Eliza (Nuttley) Ake. The father was 



a merchant, lumberman and farmer, engaging 
m merchandising at different times in New 
Washington. But he finally returned to In- 
diana county, in 1865 opening a store at Hills- 
dale, m Montgomery township, which he sold 
m 1866, retiring to his farm at Hillsdale. 
James D. Ake obtained his education in the 
public schools. He was reared on the farm 
with his father, whom he assisted in his agri- 
cultural work as well as in the general store 
at Hillsdale, also lumbering, until he reached 
the age of twenty-five years. From that time 
he has been in independent business. For a 
time he conducted sawmills near Indiana and 
Saltsburg, Indiana county, and sold lumber to 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Compan}^ Then 
he engaged in lumbering on the Susquehanna 
river and in partnership with his brother D. 
S. Ake conducted a store, also buying cattle 
and other stock. Buying out his brother he 
became associated in business with George Me- 
Keage, and for some time was extensivelv en- 
gaged in railroad building, constructing a 
road for the New York Central Railway Com- 
pany, a line near Williamsport, the line to 
Arcadia (Indiana county), the Pittsburg & 
Eastern road, the road from Rossiter Junction 
to Rossiter and from Potts Run to Madina, 
and part of the road from Burnside to Cherry- 
tree. He also conducted a store at Burnside, 
in 1902. His lumbering operations have been 
extensive. In partnership with Horace Tomp- 
kins he put in 78,000,000 feet of lumber on 
the Susquehanna river, putting the logs in 
at the head of the river. He was a partner 
of the late J. W. Clark, in the manufacture 
of lumber, rough and dressed, of all kinds. 
Mr. Ake built the street car system of the In- 
diana County Street Railroad Company at In- 
diana and was general manager during the 
construction. He is prominently identified ' 
with local banking interests, being one of the 
vice presidents of the First National Hank 
of Glen Campbell and a director of the Farm- 
ers' Bank of Indiana. He is a director of the 
Juniata Manufacturing Company, of Wil- 
liamsburg, manufacturers of blank books, etc. ; 
is connected with the Hillsdale Coal & Coke 
Company of which he is president (the firm 
composed of J. 0. and H. E. Clark), whose 
mines are located at Madeline, Indiana Co., 
Pa. ; and is president of the Arcadia Water 
Company and president of the Arcadia Land 
Company. Mr. Ake has a farm of 200 acres 
in Montgomery township, Indiana county, in 
rhe cultivation of which he is now actively 
engaged. It is thoroughly modern in all its 
appointments and up-to-date ideas and meth- 




(JymlA 



%-,aki 



HISTORY OP INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



977 



ods are eveiywliere in evidence about the 
property. The town of Hillsdale lies on the 
south side of the farm. 

On June 19, 1883, Mr. Ake man-ied Sarah 
Prances Churchill, of Hillsdale, Pa., daugh- 
ter of Philander and Elizabeth (Rank) 
Churchill, and six children have been born to 
them, one of whom, Wilfred Hall, died when 
five and a half years old. The others are: 
Almont, who is engaged in school teaching; 
Everett Camp, who is assistant cashier of the 
Pirst National Bank at Glen Campbell; Phil- 
ander, a student ; Elizabeth Rank ; and James 
Hubert. 

CLARK G. MARSHALL, a farmer and 
stockman of South Mahoning township, In- 
diana Co., Pa., was born on the old Marshall 
homestead, near his present farm, Dec. 6, 
1855. 

(I) William Marshall, the first of this 
branch of the family in Pennsylvania, was 
born in Ireland in 1722, and there grew to 
manhood and married Elizabeth Armstrong. 
In 1748 he came to the American Colonies 
and settled in the eastern part of Pennsyl- 
vania, where he followed farming. Later he 
moved to what is now Indiana county, but was 
then included in Westmoreland county, to 
which his son John Marshall had gone some 
years previously. The family secured prop- 
erty in Conemaugh township, and on it Will- 
iam Marshall rounded out his useful life, 
passing away in 1796. He was a man of sub- 
stance in his community, and highly respected 
by all who knew him. His remains were laid 
to rest in Ebenezer Church cemetery. He was 
a Presbyterian in religious faith, and devoted 
to his church. Hisr excellent wife passed 
away in 1806, having survived him for some 
ten years, and was laid by his side' in the little 
old cemetery. Among their children were: 
John, James, William, Andrew, Samuel and 
Margaret. 

(II) William Marshall, son of William 
Marshall, the immigrant ancestor, came to 
Conemaugh township with his parents and 
there engaged in farming, becoming the own- 
er of a tract of 428 acres. Later he moved to 
Armstrong county, settling near Glade Run, 
where his cousin Archibald Marshall had lo- 
cated. On this farm he spent the remainder 
of his life. His children were : Joseph mar- 
ried Elizabeth Marshall; William married 
a Miss Lewis; John married Martha Kirk- 
patrick; Elizabeth married John McClellend; 
Mary married Abel Pinley; Margaret mar- 
ried Benjamin Irwin ; James W. is mentioned 



below; Robert married Mary Hindman; 
Samuel married Julia Lentz. 

(III) James W. Marshall, son of William 
Marshall, was born on Blacklegs creek, in 
Conemaugh township, and was taken to 
Glade Run, Armstrong Co., Pa., by his 
parents. There he grew to manhood, and in 
1820 settled in what is now South Mahoning 
township, Indiana county, near the home place 
of others of the family. This was almost on 
the line dividing the south and west divisions 
of Mahoning. His tract was a large one, 
and he went to work at once to clear it of 
the heavy timber. Although he had devel- 
opments well started at the time of his death, 
he passed away while still in the prime of 
life, in 1844, when fifty-one years old. 

James W. Marshall married Margaret Mai-- 
shall, a daughter of Archibald Marshall, who 
settled in Glade Run, Armstrong Co., Pa., 
where his cousin, William Marshall, also lo- 
cated. Mrs. Marshall died in 1873, having 
survived her husband many years. Their 
children were : William ; Margaret, who mar- 
ried Thomas Davis, and (second) Nathaniel 
Doty; Joseph ,W. ; Archibald, who married 
Mary Ann Wadding ; Robert ; and Catherine, 
who mai-ried Lewis Marshall, and (second) 
Henry Bowser. 

(IV) Joseph W. Marshall, son of James 
W. Marshall, was born Dec. 11, 1827, on the 
farm in South Mahoning township. When 
he was seventeen years old he had the misfor- 
tune to lose his" father. Prior to that he. 
had attended the local schools, and after his 
father's death he continued working on the 
homestead. Wlien he attained his majority 
he obtained a tract of 120 acres of the home 
farm, ten acres of which were already cleared. 
With characteristic energy he began making 
improvements, putting up all the buildings on 
the property, including a frame residence and 
barn, and carried on general farming and 
stock raising throughout his active years. 
Wliile his life has been uneventful, he did 
his duty at all times and brought up his fam- 
ily to be an honor to the name. A strong 
Whig, he espoused the principles of the Re- 
publican party upon its formation, and held 
many offices, including those of school di- 
rector, assessor, supervisor and member of 
the election board. The Presbyterian Church 
holds his membership, and he was an elder in 
that body for yeajs, being connected with the 
congi-egation of that faith at Plumville. Al- 
though he is now eighty-five years old, he 
still possesses most of his faculties. He makes 



978 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



his home with his children, by whom he is 
much beloved. 

Joseph W. Marshall married Jane Davis, 
of South JIahoning township, a daughter of 
Abraham Davis. She died in 1863, and is 
buried ia the cemeterj' of the Mahoning Bap- 
tist Church, having been a consistent member 
of that church. Children as follows were 
born to this marriage: Adoniram Judson, 
who resides in Los Angeles, Cal., married 
Clara Irwin and (second) Jane Orr; one son 
died in infancy, unnamed; Louise Ann mar- 
ried Job W. Luckhart, of Punssutawney, Pa., 
and is deceased; Clark G. had a twin sister, 
who died in infancy. In 1865 Mr. Marshall 
married (second) Mary Stewart, a daughter 
of Thomas Stewart, who survives. They 
had the following children : Rebecca J. ; 
Margaret E., who married Clark Sink; Har- 
vey S., who is deceased (his widow, Bessie 
Hamilton, married John Kirkpatriek) ; Nettie 
Irwin, deceased; Alice R., who married El- 
mer Shaffer, of Punxsutawney, Pa. ; Lawrence 
J., of Rochester, N. Y. ; Minerva Mary ; Rainey 
W. ; Rosella Sarah, who is deceased; Mason 
Forbes, of Punxsutawney, Pa. ; Esther Fran- 
ces, who married Homer Hiskell ; and Bertha 
Dean, who maiTied Homer Sadler. 

The ^Marshall family is one of the largest 
in Indiana county, and -its representatives 
have given much attention to agricultural 
matters. Many of the finely developed farms 
of this locality are owned and operated by 
. descendants of the fir,st "William Marshall. 
The Marshalls are not confined to Indiana 
county, however, or Pennsylvania either, for 
they have spread over the country, and 
wherever found are prosperous and indus- 
trious, a credit to their name and a valuable 
addition to the community. Good blood tells, 
and careful raising brings forth the best in 
a man. The posterity of the original Mai-shall 
who braved all the dangers, not inconsider- 
able in those early days, of crossing the ocean 
to an almost unknown land, does him credit. 
(V) Clark G. Marshall is one of the best 
examples of what a man can accomplish when 
he is temperate, industrious and fiiigal. He 
was educated in the local schools, and learned 
farming from its simplest to its most com- 
plicated operations. Until he was twenty-six 
he remained at home, and then settled on a 
portion of the old homestead,' comprising 
sixty-three acres. On this property he has 
made all the present improvements, all of 
which reflect credit upon him, for they are 
modern in character and kept in excellent 
order. In addition to his original holdings he 



bought 119 acres of land in South IMahouing, 
and operates both farms, carrying on general 
farming and stock raising. A progressive 
man, he believes in applying up-to-date meth- 
ods in his work, and his success proves that 
he is right in his ideas. 

In 1881 Mr. Marshall was married to 
Nancy Thompson, of Armstrong county. Pa., 
who has proved a most excellent wife and 
mother and a true Christian woman, being 
connected with the Presbyterian Church as 
a member and active participant in all its 
good works. Children as follows have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Marshall: Salome is 
at home ; Lottie married Professor Ambrose, 
and resides at Pittsburg; Bessie, Eva, Merl, 
Wilson and John are at home. 

Mr. Marshall has always taken a deep 'in- 
terest in educational matters, and donated the 
land for the Cross Roads school which is on 
his farm. In addition to this liberality he 
served as school director for many years, and 
for twelve years was president of the board. 
For one term he was township supervisor. 
His support of the Presbyterian Church, of 
which he is a member, has always been gen- 
erous and valuable, and he has been one of 
its elders and trustees for many years. 

A strong Republican in his political convic- 
tions, Jlr. Marshall is, however, particularly 
favorable to any candidate who carries out his 
ideas regarding temperance. He believes the 
greatest evil of the times is the liquor traffic, 
and he is unalterably- opposed to encourage- 
ment of it in any way whatsoever. Very tem- 
perate in his personal habits, Mr. Marshall 
is proud of the fact that he has never taken 
a drink in his life, so that he sets an excel- 
lent example, and teaches it that way as 
well as by precept. He feels that he owes 
much of his success in life to the fact that 
he has not wasted his strength and money 
in intemperate living. Always regi-etting his 
own lack of educational advantages, he has 
labored hard and long to provide suitable 
schools and teaehera for the children of his 
district, and manv of the present desirable 
conditions have been brought about through 
his public-spirited efforts. Such a man as 
]\Ir. ]\Iarshall lends solidity to any locality, 
and he can be counted upon to give sxibstan- 
tial assistance to any movement that has for 
its object the better teaching of the masses to 
a thorough understanding of right living. 

EDWARD NT:X0N, a lifelong resident of 
Indiana, Indiana county, was the second male 
child born at that place, where his fatlier set- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



979 



tied in the early part of the last century. 
He was a relative of Col. John Nixon, who 
first read the Declaration of Independence to 
the people of Philadelphia on July 8, 1776. 

The Nixon family is of Irish extraction, 
Mr; Nixon's grandfather, Edward Nixon, 
having been born in Ireland, where he mar- 
ried a Miss Bracken and reared a family. 

Robert Nixon, son of Edward, above, was 
born in 1780 in County Donegal, Ireland, and 
came to this country when twelve years old 
with his parents, the family settling at Bask- 
ing Ridge, N. J. He came to the vicinity of 
Carlisle, Pa., in 1794, but removed the next 
year to Washington county, and then in 1798 
to Newport, on Blacklick creek, Indiana coun- 
ty, where he was engaged as a clerk in a 
store for several years with his second cousin, 
Robert Nixon. In 1803 he purchased some 
of the first lots sold at Indiana, and erected 
a story and a half hewed log house on the 
corner of Philadelphia street and Carpenter 's 
alley, on the site of the present Savings & 
Trust building. He began business as a mer- 
chant in the upper part of this house, the 
store room being reached by a pair of out- 
side stairs, and from this modest start became 
a man of affairs in the town, where he spent 
the remainder of his life. In 1812 he re- 
moved his store to larger quarters, and in 
1832 opened the celebrated "Nixon Hotel," 
on what is now the site of Godfrey Marshall 's 
residence, and was proprietor of same for 
several years. He died at Indiana in 1850, at 
the age of seventy years. Mr. Nixon was 
married in New Jersey to Mrs. ilary (Sutton) 
Ayers, daughter of Peter Sutton, Jr., and she 
died in 1851, at the age of seventy. They 
were originally members of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, later joining the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church. Their children were : 
Edward ; George, who died in Indiana ; James, 
who died at Broad Top, Pa.; Mary, wife of 
Rev. Robert "White, an M. B. minister; and 
Robert. 

Edward Nixon, son of Robert and Mary 
(Sutton) Nixon, was born Feb. 25, 1808, at 
Indiana, and received his education there, in 
the common schools. He became an excellent 
mathematician and one of the finest penmen 
in the State. When a boy he began clerking 
in the store conducted by his father, whom 
he also assisted in the work of conducting 
the "Nixon Hotel," and he early gave evi- 
dence of the business ability which won him 
such a substantial place among the successful 
men of the borough. His first business ven- 
ture was in partnership with John Thompson. 



They had a small country store at Sharp's 
mill, in this county, and also operated Sharp 's 
mill during that time, doing business there 
for four years, after which Mr. Nixon re- 
turned to Indiana and opened a store in what 
is now the Hassinger bakery. In 1843-44 he 
built a home at No. 34 North Sixth street, a 
very substantial structure of brick; part of 
the foundation was made of stone from the old 
jail, and the old jail bolt is still used on the 
cellar door. The house being so large Mrs. 
Nixon suggested that he use the south side 
for his store, which he did, carrying on mer- 
cantile business there until 1861, when he 
gave it up because of impaired health. He 
then turned the store quarters into law 
offices, Judge Clark having an office there 
from 1874 until he was elected to the Supreme 
bench. When Mr. Nixon's daughter. Miss 
Fanny W. Nixon, was appointed postmisti-ess 
of Indiana on March 17, 1886, she kept the 
office in the old store room of the house. Mr. 
Nixon was more or less of an invalid from the 
time of his retirement, in 1861, until his death, 
which occurred at his home June 2, 1889. 
His remains were interred in Oakland eeme- 
tei-y. Few citizens of the borough were held 
in higher esteem. He was honored as one of 
the most progressive and intelligent members 
of the community, and left a reputation for 
integrity and real worth of which his family 
may well be proud. For many years he was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
but some years prior to his death he and his 
wife joined the Protestant Episcopal Church. 
In political opinion he was a lifelong Demo- 
crat. 

On July 3, 1843, Mr. Nixon was married 
to Phebe Birg Keely, who was born in 1818 
at Mifflin, Mifflin Co., Pa., daughter of Henry 
Keely, and died in 1906, at the advanced age 
eighty-eight years. Five children were born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Nixon : Robert Henry, who 
died in 1901, married Lizzie Haws, of Johns- 
town, Pa., and she and their three children 
were drowned in the great flood there in 
1889; he was at one time a clerk for the 
Cambria Iron Company and later a clerk in 
the post office at Indiana. Fanny W., who 
lived at the old home, died in a hospital at 
New York City, Feb. 20, 1913, and is buried 
in Oakland cemetery, at Indiana. Emma 
Theresa died May 31, 1890, unmarried. Mary 
Belle married Philip A. Williams and (sec- 
ond) Frank T. McAvoy, of Duke Center, Pa., 
who is now doing business as a merchant. 
Virginia Burye is the wife of John McCune, 
of Johnstown, Pa. Of these, Fanny W. Nixon 



980 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



received an excellent education in public 
and select schools at Indiana, and acted as 
clerk in Judge Clark's law ofSce for eight 
years. She was commissioned postmaster of 
Indiana for four years, under Pi-esident Cleve- 
land's first administration, and in that in- 
cumbency made a record as having one of 
the best conducted and most systematically 
managed offices in Pennsjdvania. 

"WORK. The "Work family of East Mahon- 
ing township is of early pioneer stock of that 
section of Indiana county. Its representa- 
tives are numerous and now to be found in 
every part of the Union, and in many walks of 
life, a number having attained eminence in 
the professions, but here they have been for 
the most part engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits and allied lines of industry. They have 
become noted for enterprise, thrift, ability — 
the several qualities which make for success 
and substantial worth to the community. 

The founder of the Work familj- in Indi- 
ana county was William Work, a native of 
Cumberland county. Pa., born in 1760, of 
Scotch-Irish descent. He grew to manhood 
there, and it is not known whether or not 
he took part in the Revolutionary war. In 
1792 he married Miriam Scroggs, who was 
also born in Cumberland county, in 1775, 
daughter of Alexander and Rachel (Ireland) 
Scroggs, the former a Scotchman. Mr. and 
Mrs. Work crossed the Allegheny mountains 
in 1801 and made a location in "Westmoreland 
county. Pa., near what is now New Florence, 
spending three years there. Thence they 
moved to Indiana county in 1804. settling in 
what is now the western part of East I\Iahon- 
ing township, in which section Jlr. Work 
vras a pioneer farmer. He was also one of 
the first teachers there, when the schools were 
run on the subscription plan, and held in log 
structures with oiled paper windows and 
primitive furnishings. Here he passed the 
remainder of his days, dying Aug. 1, 1828, 
of cancer; he was buried in Gilgal cemetery. 
Mr. Work was one of the founders of Gilgal 
Church, from which he withdrew, however, 
in 1818, on account of doctrinal differences, 
joining the organization of the Associate 
Church at Mahoning. His wife died July 
28, 1850, and is buried in the same cemetery. 
They were the parents of fourteen children: 
(1) Rachel, born Oct. 6. 1793, married Robert 
Hamilton, and died April 8, 1878. (2) James, 
bom March 2, 1795. married Mary Ewing, 
and died Aug. 17, 1860. (3) Lettice, born 
July 7, 1796, married John Ewing, and died 



Aug. 23. 1871. (4) A. Scroggs, bom Dec. 
7, 1797, married Margaret Brown and. (sec- 
ond) Nancy Beatty, and died Oct. 23, 1878. 
(5) John, bom June 24. 1799, married Martha 
Hamilton and (second) Sarah Beattv, and 
died jMareh 6, 1872. (6) William, born Dec. 
10, 1800, is mentioned below. (7) Allen N.. 
born June 6, 1802, married Lydia Lewis, and 
died Jan. 30, 1852. (8) Sarah, born April 
17, 1805, married ]\Iatthew Steele, and died 
April 1, 1887. (9) Aaron, born Oct. 26, 1806, 
married Nancv Smith and (second) Elizabeth 
Spencer, and died Julv 21, 1892. (10) Mary, 
born Oct. 12, 1808, died Dec. 27. 1853. (11) 
Miriam, born July 25, 1810. married Alpha 
Limerick, and died Aug. 11, 1850. (12) 
Closes Thompson, boni Dee. 5, 1812, is men- 
tioned elsewhere. (13) Susan, born Sept. 30, 
1815, married John Smith, and died Feb. 24, 
1844. (14) Elijah I., bom Nov. 23. 1818, 
married Margaret McCreerj^ and died June 
25, 1892, 

WiUiam Work, son of William and Miriam 
(Scroggs) Work, was bom Dec. 10, 1800, 
in Ligonier Valley, in Westmoreland coun- 
ty, and was brought by his parents to 
what is now East Mahoning township, Indi- 
ana county, in early childhood. He received 
a thorough common school training under his 
father's tuition, and began to follow farming 
in his boyhood, continuing that calling all 
his life. He owned a farm near Little iMahon- 
ing creek, near what is now Richmond, and 
spent the rest of his days there, successfully 
engaged in general agi-icultural pursuits and 
stock raising. On July 15, 1827, Tilr. Work 
married Nancy Brown, who was born 'May 12, 
1809, daughter of Jeremiah Brown, and died 
Sept. 24, 1854. She was a member of the 
LTnited Presbyterian Church, and is buried 
in the IMahoning Church cemetery'. Ten chil- 
dren were born to this union: (1) Jeremiah 
Brown, born Oct. 24, 1828, died March 23, 
1852. (2) James M., born April 8. 1830. was 
engaged in business as an undertaker at 
Marion Center, and served as countv com- 
missioner. He died Nov. 23, 1895. On Oct. 
13, 1853, he married Margaret Hamilton, and 
for his second wife he married ]\Irs. Annie 
Rebecca (Getty) IMorton. (3) David B., bom 
]\rareh 14, 1832, is mentioned below. (4) 
Euphemia S., born JIarch 30, 1834, Tunri'ied 
William Hamilton Oct. 15, 1856, and died 
about 1890. (5) Elizabeth B., born April 21. 
1836, died Sept. 23, 1853. (6) Susan C. bom 
May 23, 1838, married in 1860 J. Thompson 
fiamilton, of East Mahoning township, and 
died in January, 1908. (7) Mary Jane, born 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



981 



June 8, 1840, married Jan. 12, 1860, Amos 
S. Miller, of Canoe township, this county, and 
died Dec. 10, 1910. (8) William Alexander 
Scroggs, born Feb. 2, 1843, is mentioned be- 
low. (9) Joseph B., born April 22, 1845, 
died April 11, 1852. (10) Silas Warren, born 
Sept. 19, 1848, is mentioned below. 

On Dec. 17, 1863, William Work, the father, 
married (second) Mary T. Hamilton, who was 
born Feb. 3, 18 — , daughter of James Hamil- 
ton, and they had two children: Clara B., 
born Sept. 17, 1868, mart-ied Samuel L. Rowe, 
justice of the peace, of Bast Mahoning town- 
ship ; John C, born Feb. 22, 1870, a resident 
of East Llahoning township, maiTied Olive 
Winecoop and (second) Mrs. Shugart. Mr. 
Work died on his farm Nov. 7, 1878, and was 
buried in the Mahoning Church cemetery. 
He was a member of the United Presbyterian 
Church. 

D.WHD Brown Work, third son of William 
and Nancy (Brown) Work, now living re- 
tired on a part of the old Work homestead 
near Richmond, in East Mahoning township, 
was born on the paternal farm March 14, 1832. 
He attended school in the home district, but 
as school was held only three months of the 
year, during the winter season, he had more 
opportunity to acquire knowledge by experi- 
ence, helping with the work on the home farm 
from early boyhood. He was thus engaged 
until twenty-four years old, when he bought 
a seventy-acre farm in the same township, 
near Marion Center, known as the Robert 
Hastings place, which he operated for a year. 
In 1857 he went to Canoe township, this 
county, and bought a tract of 125 acres in 
the woods, which was owned by John Pollock, 
and on which stood a log cabin. There he 
settled down to what was practically pioneer 
life. He cleared 100 acres of the land, and 
put it under cultivation, this tract being now 
cultivated by his sons. In 1860 he built a 
frame barn, later erected a substantial frame 
dwelling, and during his long residence on the 
place put up other buildings convenient or 
necessary, having a well-equipped property. 
There he made his home until 1895, in which 
year he returned to Bast Mahoning township, 
settling on forty-five acres which formed part 
of the old family homestead tract, and on 
which he made numerous improvements. He 
erected a dwelling house, barns and other 
buildings, and engaged in farming and stock 
raising there until 1911, since when he has led 
a retired life. He now occupies a house op- 
posite that tract, which his younger son now 
operates. Though he has always had agricul- 



tural interests, Mr. Work was engaged in the 
lumber business for seven years while a resi- 
dent of Canoe township, running a sawmill, 
and he was as successful in that line as he has 
been in his other undertakings. Though past 
eighty, and a steady worker throughout his 
active years, he enjoys excellent health, and, 
surrounded by his children and grandchil- 
dren, in comfortable circumstances, is pass- 
ing his years in enviable content. 

Mr. Work has been actively interested in 
the various vital issues which have agitated 
the country in his day. He served in the 
Union army during the Civil war under two 
enlistments, the first time joining Company 
A, Independent Battalion, under Col. John 
C. Lininger and Capt. Thomas J. Moore, for 
six months, at the end of which time he re- 
ceived an honorable discharge. On Aug. 26, 
1864. he again enlisted, becoming a member 
of Company A, 206th Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, under Capt. Thomas J. Moore and 
Col. Hugh J. Brady, and was out until the 
close of the war, his command being one of 
the first to enter Richmond after the sur- 
render. He was mustered out June 26, 1865. 
IMr. Work suffered neither sickness nor in- 
juries during his army service, and returning 
home at its close resumed his agricultural 
work. 

Formerly a Republican in his political 
views, Mr. Work now supports the Prohibi- 
tion party, being a stanch believer in temper- 
ance and an earnest advocate of the cause, 
which he has aided by example and influence 
for many years. He has taken some part in 
the administration of local affairs, having 
served twelve years in Canoe township and 
three years in East Mahoning township as 
assessor, and he was tax collector in Canoe 
township in 1869. He is a member of the G. 
A. R., belonging to Brown Post at Richmond. 
His religious connection is with the United 
Presbyterian Church. 

In 1854 Mr. Work was married, in South 
Mahoning township, to Sarah E. Colkitt, a 
native of that township, daughter of John and 
Elizabeth (Stout) Colkitt. She died in Jan- 
uary, 1867, the mother of five children, four 
of whom, however, died in infancy, the sur- 
vivor being Ida M., wife of Peter C. Pierce ; 
they have three children, Veda (wife of Ed- 
wai-d Potts), Hallie (who married Charles 
McCullough), and Floyd, the daughters liv- 
ing in Canoe township, the son at Akron, 
Ohio. On Sept. 3, 1867, Mr. Work married 
(second) Frances Emaline Colkitt, who was 
born in South JIahoniug township, daughter 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



of John and IMary (Hover) Colkitt, being a 
half-sister of his fii-st wife. Five children 
have been born to this marriage, viz. : Charles 
C, who is now on his father's old homestead, 
is unmarried ; Silas Clark, who is working his 
father's old homestead in Canoe township 
with his brother Charles, married Nancy 
Brochler, and they have three children, Ru- 
fus. Myrtle E. and Earl ; Alice married Aus- 
tin Gary Bowers, of Canoe township, and has 
four children, Chai'les, Laura, Flora and ^lil- 
dred; Floretta C. married Harvey D. Wid- 
dowson, a merchant, of Rochester Mills, this 
county, mentioned elsewhere; Edgar S., who 
is operating his father's East Mahoning farm, 
married Lizzie Simpson, daughter of Wesley 
Simpson, and they have four children, Mary 
Alice, David Brown, Prank Wesley and Lile 
Roy. 

W1LL1.VM Alexander Scroggs Work, son 
of William and Nancy (Brown) Work, re- 
ceived his education in the home locality and 
worked on the home place until he was seven- 
teen years old. He then began work in the 
lumber regions, being employed in Clearfield, 
Forest, Elk and Clarion counties, teaming and 
jobbing during the winter season. He got out 
■considerable boat lumber, ship timbers and 
spars. In August, 1861, he enlisted for serv- 
ice in the Union army, becoming a member 
of Company A, 61st Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, under Captain Creps, of Indiana 
county, and Col. 0. H. Rippy, of Pittsburg. 
The command was attached to the 6t.h Corps, 
Light Division, of the Army of the Potomac, 
and Mr. Work participated in many battles, 
including Fair Oaks. Malvern Hill. Autie- 
tam, Williamsport (Md.), Fredericksburg, 
Marye's Heights, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, 
Cold Harbor, Fort Stevens. Charleston, Ope- 
quan, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, Petersburg, 
siege of Petersburg and fall of Petersburg. 
He served over three years, was promoted to 
sergeant at Bellplain, and was mustered out 
at Pittsburg in 1864. Returning home he 
remained there two yeai-s, working on the 
farm, and was engaged in lumbering one 
winter season. Then he commenced farming 
for himself in Canoe township, Indiana coun- 
ty, buying a tract of fiftj'^ acres, to which 
he subsequently added thirty acres, operating 
in all eighty acres, devoted to general crops 
and stock raising. He also dealt in cattle 
and horses. In 1889 Mr. Work sold out his 
interests there and moved to the Simnu'l Rc^ss 
farm ( his father-in-law's) in East Mahoning 
township, a tract of eight>'-five acres, where 
he carries on general farming and stock rais- 



ing. He has made numerous improvements 
on the place, which is generally considered 
one of the best kept properties in the town- 
ship, Mr. Work and his wife taking great 
pride in its neat and attractive appearance, 
bespeaking the thrift and good taste of the 
occupants. Besides looking after his own 
affairs Mr. Work has given considerable at- 
tention to public matters and has taken an 
active part in their administration in his town- 
ship, having served as tax collector, as su- 
pervisor, and for thirteen years as member 
of the school board, of which he has also been 
treasurer. He has been active in politics as 
a stanch Republican, and has been a member 
of the township election board, serving as 
election inspector. 

On Oct. 5, 1865, Mr. Work married Mary 
Ann Ross, who was born March 21, 1847, 
daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Cowan) 
Ross, the former a native of Comity Monag- 
han. Ireland, and a pioneer settler in East 
ilahoniug township. Thev have had children 
as follows: (1) Harry C. bom Aug. 31, 1866, 
now acting as agent for the National Biscuit 
Company, mamed Florence Hunt. (2) Bes- 
sie L., born April 20, 1868, married Oct. 18, 
1887, Harvey Widdowson. (3) Ross B., born 
Dec. 27, 1870, now engaged in business as a 
shoe dealer at Grinnell, Iowa, married Rachel 
Pollock. (4) N. Jean, born ilay 11, 1873, 
married McMurry J. Thompson, a history of 
whose family will be found elsewhere, and 
they reside at Heilwood, Pa. (5) Mary Eva- 
line, born June 3, 1878, mamed James 'Slor- 
ris, a railroad engineer on the Buffalo. Roch- 
ester & Pittsburg road, and they reside at 
Punxsutawney, Pa. (6) Homer Ney, born 
June 6, 1881, now general foreman for the 
Western Union Telegi-aph Company at Al- 
bany, N. Y., married Mary Griffith, of Marion 
Center. (7) Lola Nell, 'born Oct. 15, 1886, 
married Robert M. Sutter, who is superin- 
tendent of the electric light plant at John- 
sonburg, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. and Mrs. Work are membei-s of the 
United Presb^■terian Church at Richmond, 
this county. He belongs to the G. A. R,, 
holding membership in the post at Punxsu- 
tawney. 

Silas W. Work, youngest son of William 
and Nancy (Brown) Work, was born Sept. 
19, 1848, on the farm near Richmond in East 
Mahoning township. He grew to manhood on 
that place, and in his boyhood attended the 
country school taught by Thomas Hindman, 
I\fr. Weiner, Miss Rachel Lewis and ]\Iiss 
Elizabeth Lewis. Leaving school when thir- 



HISTORY OF INPIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



983 



teen years old, he helped with the work at 
home until his enlistment, when he was but 
a boy of fifteen, for service in the Union army. 
His brothers David and Alexander were at the 
front, and as he was rather lonesome at home 
he determined to follow their example, his 
father's opposition proving in vain. In 1863 
he became a member of Company C, 2d Bat- 
talion, under Capt. William Neal and Colonel 
John C. Lininger, for six months' service, 
after which he reenlisted, becoming a member 
of Company B, 67th Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, under Capt. Samuel McHenry, sei-v- 
ing to the close of the war. He was the 
youngest from this section to carry a gun in 
defense of the Union. Returning home at 
the end of the war he remained on the home 
farm until his marriage. He then bought and 
located upon the farm in Grant township 
where he continued to live for a number of 
years, thence coming in 1886 to his present 
place, a tract of thirty-two acres in East ]\Ia- 
honing township, within the limits of the bor- 
ough of Marion Center. He is engaged in 
farming and draying, and is well and favor- 
ably known in this district, being one of the 
useful and esteemed citizens of his community. 
He has taken an active part in the adminis- 
tration of civil affairs in Marion Center, hav- 
ing served as street commissioner, and being 
at present a member of the borough council. 
He is a member of the United Presbyterian 
Church, and in political association was a Re- 
publican until the organization of the new 
Progressive party, whose principles he favors. 
On Jan. 1, 1868, Mr. Work married Caroline 
Simpson, of East Mahoning township, daugh- 
ter of John Simpson, who married Mary Ann 
Hastings. Mrs. Work died April 8, 1913. 

PETER RIDDLE, late of Indiana, was for 
over twenty years of his active life engaged 
in business as a drover, and after settling in 
the borough of Indiana carried on the livery 
business a few years before retiring. He was 
born Jan. 24, 1834. in East Mahoning town- 
ship, Indiana county, and the family is of 
Scotch-Irish extraction. His grandfather, 
William Riddle, was a farmer in East Mahon- 
ing townsliip. Indiana county. 

Michael Riddle, father of Peter Riddle, 
was born in East Mahoning township, was 
reared to . farming, and followed that voca- 
tion all his life. After the death of his first 
wife, Catherine Pounds, he moved out to the 
State of Indiana, settling at Roekville, and 
died there. He remarried. By the first union 
he had four children : Willjam J., born May 



5, 1831, who married a Miss Henry and lives 
in Clarion county. Pa. ; Margaret, Mrs. Henry 
Orr, who died in Indiana borough ; Peter ; and 
Mary Jane, Mrs. Sharp Neal, of Jefferson 
county. Pa., where she died. 

Peter Riddle was but four and a half years 
old when his mother died, and his father mov- 
ing out west to the State of Indiana he went 
to live with his maternal grandmother, Mrs. 
Margaret Pounds, who raised him. She kept 
tavern for many years at Georgeville, Indi- 
ana county, having a double log building of 
six rooms, known as the Georgeville Tavern, 
and young Peter did chores around the place 
in his early years. He was well looked after, 
was allowed to attend school part of each year 
until he reached the age of nineteen, and had 
the usual experiences of the youth of that 
day. His first teacher was James Van Horn. 
The old subscription school was held in a log 
building, furnished with slab benches and 
heated by a log fire, the pupils chopping the 
wood during the noon hour. He lived with 
his grandmother until her death, in 1862, 
when she was eighty-five years old ; she had 
given up the hotel and tavern many years be- 
fore. After her death Mr. Riddle worked 
around among farmers, and then began to 
work as drover for his cousin, William Cham- 
bers, and his partner, John Bi-ady, receiving 
fifty cents a day. He was next employed at 
cutting pine timber, at the same wages, get- 
ting up before "sunup" and walking miles 
to the tract where the work was going on. 
After a year or two at this work he became 
a drover on his own account, in 1863, buying 
horses, cattle, sheep and hogs in Indiana, Arm- 
strong, Jefferson and Clarion counties. The 
first horse he owned was bought with money 
saved while he was working for fifty cents a 
day, in the timber. He continued to follow 
droving until 1887, when he removed to In- 
diana, at which place he afterward had his 
home. For three years after removing to the 
borough he was in the livery business in part- 
nership with Calvin Bley, and after giving 
that up he lived retired. He died Dec. 25, 
1912, in his seventy-ninth year, and is bur- 
ied in Oakland cemetery, Indiana. Mr. Rid- 
dle was always a man of honorable dealings 
and business methods that were above re- 
proach, and he was respected by all his fel- 
low citizens. He was a Democrat on political 
questions. 

On March 1, 1880, Mr. Riddle was married 
in Indiana to Mary A. Bley, of Indiana, 
daughter of Conrad and Mary (Zimmerly) 
Bley, and she continues to reside at their old 



984 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



home, at No. 45 North Seventh street, Indi- 
ana. They had no children, but they raised 
a niece, Jennie R. Bley, daughter of John 
Bley, Mrs. Riddle's brother. She died Nov. 
20, 1907; she had married Samuel J. Apple, 
and left two sons, Samuel R. and John A. 
Mrs. Riddle is a Lutheran in religious faith. 

WILLIAM E. OAKES has an extensive 
lumber business at Clymer, Indiana counts', 
where he has been settled practically since 
the town was founded. He was born April 
14, 1867, near Blairsville,this county, son of 
John G. and Sarah (Kauffman) Oakes. 

Edward Oakes, his grandfather, was from 
Ireland, as was also his wife. They came to 
Pennsylvania in 1794, first settling near Ar- 
magh, Indiana county, and later moving to 
Burrell township, same county, near Blairs- 
ville. Edward Oakes was a soldier in the 
war of 1812 and also in the Mexican war. He 
was killed near his home, by a falling tree. 

John G. Oakes, father of William E. Oakes, 
was born in 1832 in Blairsville. He was a 
farmer in his early days. In 1864 he en- 
listed in the Union army for service in the 
Civil war, becoming a member of Battery 
K, 2d Pennsylvania Regiment, and serving 
until mustered out, in January, 1866. At 
the battle of the Wilderness he was wounded 
and captured, being taken to Libby prison, 
where he was held for nine months. After 
his discharge he returned to Blairsville, and 
thence moved to the West, where he passed 
the brief remainder of his life, dying in Oc- 
tober, 1867, near lola, Kansas. Mr. Oakes 
married Sarah Kauffman, who was born in 
18-39 in Johnstown, Pa., and whose parents, 
Jonas and Sarah Kauffman, were natives of 
Switzerland. Three children were born to 
this marriage: F. J., the eldest, resides in 
Fall River, Kans. ; Jennie is the wife of J. E. 
Williams, of Johnstown; William E. is men- 
tioned below. 

William E. Oakes attended public school 
near Blairsville. His first work was on a farm 
in Kansas. He learned the carpenter's trade 
in Johnstown, Pa., and followed it there for 
fifteen years, in 1898 starting in business 
at Conemaugh, this county, where he still has 
Interests. In 1904 he came to Lovejoy, In- 
diana county, and thence shortly afterward 
to Clymer, when the town had just made a 
start as such. He has been engaged in the 
lumber trade ever since he settled there, and 
has built up a lucrative business, being re- 
garded as one of the active and progressive 
residents of the place. He is very well known 



in fraternal connections, being a member of 
Indiana Lodge, B. P. 0. Elks, and a high 
Mason, belonging to Cambria Lodge, F. & A. 
M., of Johnstown (of which he is a past mas- 
ter), to the Consistory at Williamsport and 
to the Shrine at Altoona. 

On Jan. 28, 1890, i\Ir. Oakes was married, 
at Johnstown, Pa., to Emma R. Devlin, a na- 
tive of Johnstown, daughter of Theodore and 
Lydia Devlin. Mrs. Oakes died Aug. 13, 1911. 
She was the mother of ten children, namely: 
Clifford, now residing at Dixon\'ille, this 
county, who married Ellen Clawson and has 
two children; Theodore: Earl; Ruth: Car- 
rie; Carroll; Frank; Bessie: Agnes, and 
Olive. 

E. M. BUSHNELL, M. D.. of Blacklick. 
Indiana county, is one of the county's lead- 
ing young physicians aud surgeons. He is 
a native of the State of Vermont, born at 
Williston Feb. 3, 1877, son of Nelson and 
Sarah (]\Iarrs) Bushnell. Dr. Bushnell is a 
member of one of the oldest and best-known 
families of New England, whose members have 
all been capable and useful citizens of their 
various communities. 

Dr. Bushnell obtained his elementary edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native town, 
and from there he entered Goddard Seminary, 
at Barre, Vt., from which institution he was 
graduated in the class of 1899. He then en- 
tered the medical department of the Univer- 
sity of Vermont, and after taking the full 
course in medicine graduated in the class of 
1903. Taking up the practice of his profes- 
sion in I\Iassachusetts, he stayed there a few 
months, when he determined to come West, 
and he located at Coral. Indiana Co., Pa. He 
practiced for three years here with Dr. W. 
D. Gates, now one of the well-known practi- 
tioners of Indiana, Pa., and in November, 
1906, located at Blacklick, in Burrell town- 
ship, establishing an office of his own. In the 
six years he has been there he has built up a 
most gratifying practice. He is energetic and 
conscientious, and has proved a most skillful 
physician. He is the physician for the Jose- 
phine Iron Company, where he has an office, 
and where he has an assistant for his work. 
His general pi-actice takes him over a wide 
radius of territory. He is popular, genial and 
greatly respected in his community. He takes 
a deep interest in public schools and their 
improvement, and is one of the school directors 
of the township of Burrell, giving much of 
his time and attention to that interest. Being 
public-spirited, his best efforts are given to aid 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



in the benefit of his town and county and their 
people, but he is not an office seeker. He 
votes the Repiiblican ticket. 

Dr. Bushnell married Winifred Gerard, of 
Burrell township, a lady of refinement and 
culture. She belongs ' to the Presbyterian 
Church. The Doctor is a member of I. 0. 
0. F. at Blackliek, and also a member of the 
Woodmen of the World, for which he is medi- 
cal examiner. He is medical examiner for 
several insurance organizations. 

HARRY W. TRUITT, D.D.S., now in com- 
mand of a creditable patronage in the bor- 
ough of Indiana, is a splendid type of the 
■ self-made American. He has made his way 
against many obstacles,which makes his suc- 
cess the more notable and deserved. Dr. 
Truitt was born Jan. 23, 1878, at Truittsburg, 
Clarion Co., Pa., which place was named in 
honor of his father. 

George Washington Truitt, the Doctor's 
grandfather, lived and died in Madison town- 
ship, Armstrong Co., Pa., and was a farmer 
by occupation. He married Nancy Coursin, 
who was of Welsh extraction, and they had 
three children, all sons, namely: Seth C, of 
Clarion county; Alcinus Glen; and M. M., 
of Armstrong county, who is on the old Truitt 
homestead in Madison township. 

Alcinus Glen Triiitt. son of George W. 
Truitt, was bom Jan. 30, 1844, in Madison 
township, Armstrong county, and there spent 
his boyhood. He obtained his early education 
in the subscription or public schools, later at- 
tended college, and taught school for several 
years. In 1862 he enlisted in the 14th Pa. 
Cavalry, and served during the war till its 
close. After his marriage he located at the 
Truittsburg settlement in Clarion county. 
There he carried on a general store in part- 
nership with his brother Seth C, the firm be- 
ing known as A. G. Truitt & Co. He was one 
of the most respected and popular citizens 
in that section, being the only Republican 
justice of the peace there, and the first Re- 
publican ever elected to that office in Clarion 
county. He died Feb. 2, 1885. Mr. Truitt 
was a prominent member of the Baptist 
Church, and served as superintendent of the 
Sunday school. He was married at Oakland, 
Armstrong county, to Jennie E. Corbett, of 
that county, daughter of Lewis and Lucinda 
(Mohney) Corbett, the latter a native of Ger- 
many, who came to the United States in girl- 
hood. Lewis Corbett was of Irish origin, his 
gi-eat-grandfather being the first of the family 
to come to this countrv. After Mr. A. G. Tru- 



itt 's death Mrs. Truitt returned, with her only 
child, Harry W., to her old home in Oakland. 
She now lives with him in the borough of In- 
diana. 

Hariy White Truitt was but seven years old 
when his father died, after which, until he was 
fourteen, he lived in Armstrong county. Af- 
ter his grandfather's death, he moved with 
his mother to Reynoldsville. His earliest am- 
bition was to obtain a good education, and 
his youth was one continuous struggle toward 
that end. After attending several elementary 
schools, he went to the high school and then to 
the DuBois business college. At the age of 
fourteen he became "devil" in the office of 
the Re.ynoldsville Star, and was the first boy 
to hold the position in that ofilce. He had the 
honor of helping to put the Star in running. 
While thus engaged, he attended night school. 
Some idea of the untiring efforts and the sac- 
rifices he made to continue his education may 
be gained from the statement that while he 
was taking his business course at DuBois he 
made the round trip of twenty miles daily on 
an old bicycle, because he could not afford 
to pay the extra board. While attending the 
old academy at New Bethlehem, he had to 
walk three miles from Oakland each way. 
He took private lessons in Latin and German 
from Hannah Jane Nickle, of Reynoldsville, 
where she had a five and ten cent store, paying 
for his instruction by tending to her store 
during the noon hour. He pursued his pro- 
fessional course at the Medico-Chirurgical Col- 
lege. After graduating from that institution 
he opened an office in New Bethlehem, and 
met with gratifying success while located 
there, but in June, 1906, he removed to In- 
diana, where a larger field was opened for his 
efforts. His splendidly equipped offices are 
in the Savings & Trust Company's building, 
and his beautiful buff brick house is located 
on South Seventh street. Dr. Truitt is not 
only one of the successful dentists of the bor- 
ough but also one of its leading citizens. He 
stands high in his profession, and he had the 
honor of being chosen a delegate to the Re- 
publican national convention held at Chicago, 
and later as a Progressive delegate to that 
city. He was a member of the Steering com- 
mittee at the last State convention held at 
Harrisburg, and was chairman of the Wash- 
ington party of Indiana county, until his 
resignation. 

On Oct. 4, 1900, at Reynoldsville, Jefferson 
county. Pa.. Dr. Truitt was married to Maud 
R. Riston, of Reynoldsville, daughter of David 
W. Riston. They have four children : Harry 



986 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



W., Jr.. Julia Marie, Dorothy Jane and Don 
A. Dr. Truitt is a member of the Baptist 
Church at New Bethlehem, and his wife is a 
Presbyterian. 

REV. ANTHONY BARON, pastor of the 
Holy Cross Catholic Church at Iselin, Indi- 
ana county, is a native of Silesia, Prussian 
Poland, born April 18, 1873. He was one 
of the twelve children born to Joseph and 
Mary (Serzysko) Baron, the foi-mer a land 
owner and farmer of that place. All of this 
large family siu-vive. 

Father Baron obtained his early education 
in the government schools of his native place, 
and thence went to Rome, where he prepared 
for the priesthood at the Gregorian Univer- 
sity, studying theology and philosophy. He 
was ordained in 1896 by Bishop Corsta, of 
his native diocese, after which he spent two 
years as assistant at home and also traveled 
through Russia. Returning to Rome he re- 
mained there four years, taking up the study 
of canon law and Oriental studies in the St. 
Apollinaris University, completing the course 
in 1903. in which year he came to America. 
He became assistant priest at St. Casimir's 
Polish Catholic Church at Johnstown, Pa., 
in the Altoona diocese, and was later ap- 
pointed pa.stor at St. Stanislaus Polish Cath- 
olic Church at Boswell, in the same diocese, 
administering to the spiritual wants of that 
congi-egation for two years. He then went to 
Rome on a mission to the Holy See, being ab- 
sent a year, and upon his return to this coun- 
try became assistant to Rev. Father Gorz>'n- 
ski. at St. Adelbert Church, Pittsburg, Pa., 
in the Pittsburg diocese. He remained there 
until his appointment, in January, 1911, as 
pastor of the Holy Cross Church at Iselin, 
where he has been located ever since. There 
are eight hundred memliers in this congre- 
gation, of different nationalities, iuclnding 
Poles, Italians, Huns and other southern 
Europeans. Father Baron celebrates two 
masses each Sunday and holy day, and 
preaches tliree sei-mons. one in English, one 
in Polish and one in Italian. He is a man 
of scholarly attainments, especially gifted as 
a linguist, speaking French, Spanish, Italian, 
Polish, Russian. German and English, and be- 
ing familiar with Greek and Latin and many 
of the Oriental languages. 

During his residence at Iselin Father Baron 
has done inucli toward raising the moral 
standards of his congregation, encouraging 
them to the practice of integrity, honesty and 
true Cliristianity, and he is looked up to by 



all in the vicinity who have come in contact 
with him, regardless of creed or class. 

Holy Cross parish was formed in 1907. A 
fine church and rectory have been built, and 
missions are to be esta])lished at the mining 
towns of Kent and Jacksonville. Father 
Baron is energetic and possessed of marked 
executive ability, a forceful speaker, and is 
proving a strong influence for good in the 
community where he is settled. 

THOMAS CRAVEN, one of the oldest resi- 
dents of Indiana county, a veteran of the 
Civil war. and owner of 170 acre^ of land in 
White township, was bom in Rayne township, 
this county, Jul.y 20, 1826, son of Nathaniel 
Simpson Craven. 

Thomas Craven, the grandfather, married 
twice, his second wife being a Miss Simpson, 
and she was the grandmother of Thomas 
Craven. 

Nathaniel Simpson Craven was born in 
Cherrj'hill township, this county, in 1806, and 
died in Canoe township. He was a farmer all 
his life. His wife, Rebecca (Pollock), was a 
native of County Derry, Ireland, and children 
as follows were born of this marriage : 
Thomas; ]\Iai'tha, who married AVilliam ]\Iitc!i- 
ell; Robert, who married Sarah Joyant af- 
ter going to some Western State ; Rebecca, 
who married David ]\Iitchell ; and David, Lu- 
eiuda and Jane, all of whom died in infancy. 

Thomas Craven was educated in the schools 
of his neighborhood, and when still a lad be- 
gan lumbering and did considerable rafting on 
the river. In the summer months he worked 
at farming. Believing that it was his duty 
to defend his country, he enlisted in Com- 
pany A. 206th Pennsylvania Volunteer In- 
fantry, in 1864, and sei-ved until the close 
of the war, having been an able and efficient 
soldier. 

In 1881 Mr. Craven married Martha Colta- 
baugh. who was born Sept. 29, 1847, in Dun- 
cansville. Pa., a daughter of George and Mar- 
garet (Bertuette'i Coltabausrh. After mar- 
riage ilr. Craven located in Washington town- 
.ship. but later bought his present farm, where 
he has since resided. The large coal and coke 
industries of Ernest are located on land which 
was formerly attached to his place. He is a 
heavy stockholder in the company controlling 
these holdings, and their present development 
is largely due to his business entei-prise. 

:\rr. and Mrs. Craven have had the follow- 
ing children : Annie M.. living with her par- 
ents; Aaron, who married Mary Hinton. and 
is living in White township; and Catherine, 



HISTORY OF IxNTDIxySTA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



987 



at home. Mr. Craven is independent in his 
political views, believing in electing good men 
to office without regard to party ties. He is 
very liberal in his religious ideas, x-ealizing 
that each man must work out his own plan 
of salvation. Having always been a man of 
prominence in his community, he has taken 
part in many public affairs, and has always 
maintained the full confidence and respect of 
his 



ANDREW JACKSON SMITH, custom 
shoemaker, of Indiana, Indiana county, has 
an up-to-date establishment and is one of the 
most reliable men in his line in this section. 
He is a native of the county, born Oct. 27, 
1846, at Shelocta, son of Aaron Smith and 
grandson of Jacob Smith, both of whom were 
shoemakers. The grandfather died at New 
Berlin, Union Co., Pennsylvania. 

Aaron Smith was born at New Berlin, 
Union county, but passed the greater part of 
his life at Shelocta, in Indiana county, follow- 
ing his trade there. He was married in this 
county to Elizabeth Woodward, who died at 
Shelocta, the mother of the following chil- 
dren : Pauline, Mrs. Kauffman, who is de- 
ceased ; Andrew Jackson ; and Edward, now 
deceased, who was only in his sixteenth year 
when he entered the service with his brother 
Andrew during the Civil war. For his sec- 
ond wife Aaron Smith married Margaret 
Sharp, and they had three children: J. 
Sharp, now of Brookville, Pa. ; Clarence, of 
Indiana county. Pa. ; and Hugh M. Mr. 
Smith died Oct. 19, 1898, at the home of Mrs. 
Kauffman. 

Andrew Jackson Smith grew to manhood at 
Shelocta and there obtained his education in 
the public schools. He then learned his trade 
under the instruction of his father, receiving 
a very thorough training. When in his sev- 
enteenth year he enlisted for service in llie 
Union army, being one of the youngest sol- 
diers that went into the field. He was a mem- 
ber of Company G, 2d Battalion, 57th Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving six 
months with that command, after which he 
reenlisted in Company A, 206th Pennsyl- 
vania Regiment. Upon his return he went to 
work at Gettysburg, Indiana county, at his 
trade, and was employed there until 1867, 
when he went to Kelleysburg, this county, for 
a period of three years. He has since been a 
resident of that borough. He first worked 
here for Samuel Myers, commencing in busi- 
ness on his own account in 1885. His orig- 
inal location was on Philadelphia street, where 
Jordan's shoe store is at present. Thence he 



moved to Carpenter avenue, thence to the 
Mitchell building on Philadelphia street, and 
from there to his present stand, at No. 24 
Carpenter avenue. He does custom shoe work, 
making a specialty of skillful repairing, and 
his plant is well equipped with modern ma- 
chinery and tools for carrying on this work in 
the most approved manner. He has prospered 
in business by the most commendable meth- 
ods, and is one of the substantial and respected 
citizens of the community where he has so 
long resided. 

In 1874 Mr. Smith married Lizzie Myers, of 
Indiana, daughter of Samuel Myers, his 
former employer. Mrs. Smith died in 1882, 
leaving three children: Harry E., who is 
at home ; W. Edward, of Indiana, who is mar- 
ried to Essie Swarts ; and Mabel, at home. 

In politics Mr. Smith adheres to the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party, but takes no 
active part in public affairs. 

REV. GEORGE MacKINNY RYALL, pas- 
tor of the Presbyterian Church in the bor- 
ough of Saltsburg, Indiana county, has been 
serving that congregation since June, 1900. 
He is an able and tireless worker, and has 
accomplished much toward bringing the 
church to its present prosperous condition. 

The Ryall family came from New Jersey 
but has long been settled in Pennsylvania, and 
Mr. Ryall's paternal grandparents, John and 
Janet (Bovard) Ryall, were natives of West- 
moreland county, iloving west to Ashland 
county, Ohio, they followed farming there, 
and there reared their family, which consisted 
of eight children. Grandfather Ryall died at 
the age of seventy-nine years, his wife living 
to the age of eighty-seven. 

Oliver Bovard Ryall, father of Rev. George 
M. Ryall, was born June 3, 1835, in Ashland 
county, Ohio. When a young man he became 
the representative of a publishing house deal- 
ing in school books, and while thus engaged 
■met his future wife. Margaret A. Lafferty, wlio 
at the time was teaching the Millwood school, 
in Derry township. Westmoreland Co., Pa. 
She was a native of Indiana county. Pa., where 
her father John Pettit Lafferty was also born 
(in 1800), her mother Mary (McCurdy). be- 
ing a native of Westmoreland county, John 
Pettit Lafferty was born in 1800 on a farm 
four miles from Salt.sburg, Pa. Early in his 
married life he moved to Jacksonville, Indiana 
county, where he engaged in merchandising, 
was postmaster, and justice of the peace for 
twenty-five years. It was through his influ- 
ence that Jacksonville became a borough. He 
was also one of the promoters of the Jack- 



988 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



sonville Academy, a famous school in its day, 
and served as one of its trustees as long as it 
existed. He died at the age of seventy-four 
years, his wife at the age of eighty-eight. 
They had a family of six children. Four chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Oliver B. 
Ryall: George MacKinny was the eldest: 
Wallace Wilberforee, born Aug. 17, 1874, in 
Jacksonville, Indiaia county, now engaged in 
the practice of medicine at Youngstown, Ohio, 
married Emma Vernon Stewart, of Pittsburg, 
and they have two children, Margaret and 
"Wallace ; Janet Annie, born Dec. 26, 1876, at 
Pittsburg, Pa., is the wife of Harry Woods 
Grier, who is in the employ of the Second Na- 
tional Bank of Pittsburg, and they have two 
children, Janet Ryall and Robert Jeff ry ; John 
Milton, born Oct. 27, 1879, now engaged with 
the National Life Insurance Company of Ver- 
mont at Pittsburg, married Catherine P. 
Stahl, of Homestead, Pa., and has two chil- 
dren, John M. and Catherine Elizabeth. 

George MacKinny Ryall was born July 12, 
1872, in Pittsburg, Pa., and received his early 
education there in the Twentieth ward pub- 
lic school. Later he entered the Central high 
school, took his collegiate course at Washing- 
ton and Jefferson College, Washington, Pa., in 
the class of 1895. and prepared for the min- 
istry' at the Western Theological Seminary, 
North Side, Pittsburg, Pa., gi-aduating in 
May, 1898. His first call was to West Eliza- 
beth, Allegheny Co., Pa., where he remained 
as pastor for three years, from there coming 
to Saltsburg in June, 1900. His labors in his 
present field are heavy, the church having a 
membership of 563, and his intelligent, con- 
scientious work has won the approbation of 
all classes in the borough, regardless of de- 
nomination. 

Mr. Ryall was married Sept. 6, 1901, to 
Katherine IMorrison Howard, of Pittsburg, 
• daughter of William N. and Katherine W. 
Howard, who had a family of five children. 
l\Ir. Howard is an iron broker in Pittsburg. 

He is the eldest son of Rev. William D. 
Howard, D. D., for twenty-seven years the 
well-known and dearly beloved pastor of the 
Second Presbyterian Church of Pittsburg. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ryall have had one chikl. 
William Howard, bom Aug. 17, 1904. 

JOHN SMITH ROSS, an undertaker and 
mill owner of Richmond, Indiana county, was 
born in Winslow township, Jefferson Co., Pa., 
Feb. 27, 1860. 

Robert Ross, grandfather of John Smith 
Ross, was born in Ireland, but came of Scotch 



ancestrj-. In young manhood, he left his na- 
tive land for America, and located on a farm 
near Strattonville, Clarion Co., Pa., where he 
married a iliss McKinley, of that locality, 
and to them were born the following children : 
James, Dina, Mary, Nancy, William, Mar- 
gret, Joseph, Jane, Robert, and IMartha. He 
remarried after the death of his first wife, and 
to the second union was born a son, named 
John. He died Aug. 5, 1861. 

Robert Ross, son of Robert Ross, and father 
of John Smith Ross, was born in Clarion 
countj^. Pa., June 15, 1825. Owing to the 
conditions of his time and lo(?ality, his educa- 
tional advantages were limited to those af- 
forded at the subscription school which he at- 
tended a few mouth.s during the winter season, 
his time being otherwise occupied mth assist- 
ing his father in the work on the farm. In 
early manhood he went to Winslow township, 
Jefferson Co., Pa., where he married Polly Me- 
Creight, daughter of Andrew McCreight, a 
pioneer settler of Jefferson county, and be- 
came a farmer and lumbennan. In 1864 he 
sold his faimi in Winslow township, and set- 
tled in East Mahoning township, Indiana Co., 
Pa., where he bought what was known as the 
John Bovard farm. Here Mr. Ross lived for 
fourteen years, carrying on farming and stock 
raising. In 1878 he left the farm, locating 
in Indiana, where on Nov. 12, 1878, he died : 
his remains were interred in Oakland ceme- 
tery. Twentj^-eight years latei', on Dec. 26. 
1906, his widow died, aud her body was in- 
terred by his side. From the time of the 
formation of the Republican party iintil his 
demise Mr. Ross heartily supported its prin- 
ciples and candidates, and was an honorable 
and upright man, in political as well as busi- 
ness affairs. The United Presbyterian Church 
held his membership and received his gener- 
ous support. The children of Mr. and ]\Irs. 
Ross are: Thomas M., born March 5, 1855. 
resides at Mechanicsburg, Pa.: Annie, born 
Sept. 5, 1857, married James M. ]\IcCall, and 
resides at Falls Creek, Pa. : John Smith was 
born Feb. 27, 1860; Adda B., bom Nov. 10, 
1862, married Beniwel Houffh, of Prescott- 
ville, Pa. ; and Abram B., born Sept. 25, 1865, 
i-esides at DuBois. Pennsylvania. 

John Smith Ross, son of Robert and Polly 
Ross, was but four years of age when the fam- 
ily came to East Mahoning township, so that 
he was practically reared in this locality. In 
young manhood he took up the profession 
of school teaching, which he followed about 
Iwenty years. In 1888. he settled in Rich- 
mond. Grant township, where he became a 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



989 



general merchant in partnership with Josiah 
Widdowson, under the firm name of Wid- 
dowson & Ross. Four years later he became 
a commercial traveler for George A. Horn 
& Co., of Newark, N. Y., operating in New 
York State and Michigan, and was thus en- 
gaged several years. In 1903 he associated 
himself with J. C. Weaver; under the name 
of Weaver & Ross, in an undertaking busi- 
ness, which still continues, and in which he 
has acquired the reputation of being a fun- 
eral director and embalmer of more than or- 
dinary ability. In 1912 Mr. Ross formed a 
partnership with John A. Nolf, for the pur- 
pose of buying the Patchen Roller Flouring 
Mill, now operated under the name of Savan 
Roller Mills. This plant is equipped with 
both water and steam power, with a capacity 
of forty barrels of flour per day. Mr. Ross 
and his partner are now engaged in operating 
their milling plant with very gi'atifying re- 
sults. 

In addition to the activities heretofore men- 
tioned, Mr. Ross was engaged during the years 
1903 and 1904 in leasing and developing the 
coal interests in South Mahoning township. 
Indiana Co., Pa., and in Cowanshannock and 
Plumcreek townships, in Armstrong county. 
Pa. During this time the Buffalo and Sus- 
quehanna Company bought on options taken 
by Mr. Ross over seven thousand acres of coal 
lands, and the Buffalo, Rochester and Pitts- 
burg Company bought 1,734 acres. 

Fraternally Mr. Ross is an Odd Fellow and 
a Mason, a member of Indiana Lodge, No. 
313. F. & A. M. During all the years of his 
manhood, he has been a stanch Republican, 
has served his township in the capacity of 
school director for nine years and is at pres- 
ent secretary of the board. Like his father 
he is a Presbyterian, belonging to the ITnited 
Presbyterian Church of Richmond, and is 
serving that body as an elder, while for some 
time he has been superintendent of the Sab- 
bath school. 

Mr. Ross was married (first) in 1891 to 
Electa L. Widdowson, a daughter of William 
and Louisa Widdowson, a history of whose 
family is to be found elsewhere in this work. 
Two daughters were liorn to this union : Lu- 
cile. born Feb. 19, 1896, and Louise, bom 
April 26, 1907. Mrs. Ross died May 17, 1907. 
In 1912 Mr. Ross married (second") ]\Trs. Flora 
(Hamilton') Schrecengost, daushter of Wil- 
liam and Lena Hamilton, of South Mahoning 
township. By her first husband. Park Schre- 
cengost, she had two children, Lena and Vir- 
ginia. Mr. and Mrs. Ross have no children. 



Mr. Ross is one of the most progressive 
men of his township, possessing an unusual 
degree of ability. A man of domestic tastes, 
he takes his pleasure in his family circle, 
and is proud of his home and surroundings. 
Such a man is a credit to his community and 
to his own individual efforts. 

JAMES SID WELL GETTY, a farmer and 
stock raiser of Conemaugh township, was born 
Feb. 28, 1851, in that township, on the old 
homestead of his father, James Getty. 

Andrew Getty was the great-grandfather 
of James S. Getty, and was a native of Ire- 
land. 

James Getty, son of Andrew Getty, settled 
on Blacklegs creek, in Conemaugh township, 
Indiana Co., Pa., about two miles from Clarks- 
burg, on a large tract of land opposite the 
present election house, on the road between 
Saltsburg and Clarksburg. There he followed 
farming and stock raising with good results, 
and rounded out a successful life, at the time 
of his death holding the full confidence and 
respect of his associates. He married Pru- 
dence Green, and they had children as fol- 
lows: James; Andrew, who married Mar- 
garet G. Henderson and (second) Jane 
(Deane) Kelley, widow of Albert Kelley (he 
liad six children by his first marriage) ; and 
Catherine, who married Archibald Temple-, 
ton, a brick manufacturer of Saltsburg. 

James Getty, son of James Getty, and 
father of James S. Getty, was born Jan. 6, 
1823, in Conemaugh township, and died June 
6. 1903. He attended the subscription schools 
of the period. Before he attained his major- 
ity he went to Ohio, but returned after a 
short stay and began boating on the canal, 
owning in con.iunction with John Elder the 
"Sciota," a section boat. This they ran from 
Philadelphia to Pittsburg. Mr. Getty being 
the captain. In 1848 their business had so 
increased as to justify his buying the Alex 
Templeton farm. This property comprised 
150 acres of good land, and he began oper- 
ating it as a general farmer and stock raiser. 
He became interested in the diseases of ani- 
mals, and studied veterinaiw surgery under a 
Mr. Hickey, of Westmoreland county. So 
skilled did he become that his services were 
called for by outsiders, and he soon had a 
large practice, extending over several coun- 
ties. 

Wben the country had need of his services 
Mr. Getty enlisted in Company C. 4th Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Cavalry, in September, 
1864, and served until the close of the war. 



990 



HISTOEY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



participating in the battles of Hatcher's Run 
and Five Forks, besides minor engagements, 
and was present at the surrender at Appo- 
mattox. 

First a Republican, he later changed his 
political views and died a Democrat. For 
many years he was a prominent figure in 
township affairs, and served as school director, 
overseer of the poor and supervisor. Until 
1890 he continued his fanning and profes- 
sional work, and subsequently lived retired. 
He was laid to rest beside his wife in Edge- 
wood cemetery, at Saltsburg, Pennsylvania. 

James Getty married Anna Elder Tem- 
pleton, who was born March 26, 1820, daugh- 
ter of Alex and Anna (Marshall) Templeton, 
and died Feb. 23, 1899. They had two chil- 
dren : Alex Templeton, who was born Nov. 
20, 1847, and died Oct. 27, 1863 ; and James 
Sidwell. 

James Sidwell Getty was born in a log 
house on his father's homestead and brought 
up amid primitive conditions that helped to 
strengthen his character and teach him habits 
of thrift and industry which have continued 
with him through life. In boyhood he at- 
tended the common schools of District No. 8. 
and later went to Saltsburg academy. Fol- 
lowing this he taught school for six terms in 
Conemaugh township. Having earned suffi- 
cient money, he took a course of one term at 
the Indiana normal, and a commercial course 
in the Spencerian business college at Cleve- 
land, Ohio. Returning home, he taught school 
from 1880 to 1888 in Conemaugh township, 
and afterward bought the homestead of his 
father. During the aged father's last years 
Mr. Getty and his wife took care of him and 
made him comfortable with filial devotion. 
The valuable property owned by ^Ir. Getty is 
underlaid with a rich vein of coal, now owned 
by the Mitchell -Watson Company. Mr. Getty 
is engaged in farming and stock raising and 
has met with fair success in most of his ven- 
tures. A Democrat politically, he has been 
called upon to serve as school director, and 
has also been township auditor, assessor and 
supervisor, administering the affairs of tliese 
offices creditably. 

On Dee. 23, 1886, Mr. Getty was married to 
Mary Elizabeth Rose, daughter of George and 
Lucinda (Alter) Rose. Six children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Getty, five of whom 
survive: Anna May, who is a gradiiate of 
the Indiana normal school, class of 1909, is 
now teaching at "Wilmerding, Pa. ; Ben.iamin 
died in infancy ; Sarnh Rose, who was gradu- 
ated from the Inrliiuia normal in 1911, is now 



teaching at Saltsburg Extension, after having 
taught one term in the district schools and one 
term in Lyman county, S. Dak. ; ]Maiy El- 
vira is attending the Indiana normal; AUce 
Glyndon and Thelma Theodora are attending 
school. 

Mr. Getty has gone into the cultivation of 
the soil and the kindred lines of work sensibly, 
with a due appi'cciation of the relative merits 
of intensive farming and the utilization of 
modern machinery. As a result, with but 
little more outlay, and in less time than be- 
fore, he is able to accomplish many things 
that were impossible in the earlier days. In 
his career he demonstrates that there are as 
good, if not better, openings for j'oung men 
in agricultural sections as in cities, and his 
example ought to prove beneficial in inducing 
more men to embrace agriculture as a life 
calling. 

RICHARD WILLIAMS, who is engaged 
in general farming at Grisemore, in Green 
township, is a son of William M. Williams, a 
retired farmer, also living at Grisemore. The 
Williams family is of Welsh origin and has 
been settled in this part of Indiana county 
since the first half of the last century. 

Richard W. Williams, great-grandfather of 
Richard Williams, was born in 1796 on the 
island of Anglesea, Wales, and came to the 
United States in 1832, first settling in ]\Iadison 
county, N. Y. He then moved to Pittsburg, 
Pa., living in AUeghen.v county for six j'ears, 
and thence, in 1845, came to Indiana county, 
settling in Green township, on the place where 
his grandson William M. Williams now lives. 
There he remained until his death, in 1876. in 
his eighty-first year. He was one of the men 
interested in the establishment of a Welsh 
Church and Sunday school in the vicinity. Py 
his first wife, Jane (Davis), he had a family 
of seven children, six sons and one daughter, 
all born in Wales, and all of whom came to 
this country. For his second wife he married 
Sarah James, of Pittsburg, a native of Wales, 
wlio is deceased. 

William R. Williams, son of Richard W. 
and Jane (Davis) AYilliams, was born in 1814 
in Wales, and was quite young when brought 
to this country. He came with his father to 
Indiana county, and continued to live here 
until his death, which occurred Jan. 16. 1905. 
In 1836 he married Elizabeth ^Torris. also a 
native of Wales, born in 1816. who was but a 
child when she came to America with her par- 
ents, Robert Morris and his wife. Robert, 
]\Torris was a native of North Wales. I^pon 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



991 



his arrival in this country he first settled in 
Madison county, N. Y., later, in 1840, settling 
in Indiana county, Pa., where he made his 
home in Green township, conducting a saw- 
mill for some time and subsequently devoting 
himself to farming, which he carried on the 
rest of his life. His family consisted of seven 
children. Mrs. Elizabeth (Morris) Williams 
died March 19, 1903. She was the mother of 
nine children, the eldest dying in infancy; 
William M. is mentioned below ; Robert is de- 
ceased (he was in the Union service through- 
out the Civil war, serving in Company A, 
67th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, was 
captured, and was confined in Libby prison 
and at Andereonville) ; Jane became the wife 
of Thomas Walter, of Venango county, Pa., 
and both are deceased ; Maiy, deceased, was 
the wife of Henry Kelly, of Pine Flats, this 
county, who survives; Richard is deceased; 
Elizabeth married Hugh Williams and is de- 
ceased; two died in infancy. 

William M. Williams was a boy when 
the family came to Indiana county in 1845, 
and he received a public school education in 
Green township. From an early age he as- 
sisted with the farm work and lumbering, 
and during several j^ears of his young man- 
hood conducted a water mill in this county 
which he bought from his grandfather. 
Later, with his father and brother Robert, he 
bought a steam mill with which he was con- 
nected for over forty years, and which was 
conducted by William R. Williams & Sons. 
Meantime he had also become interested in 
farming, which he continued until his decease 
on Jan. 28, 1913, on the old homestead near 
Grisemore. Though never a seeker after pub- 
lic honors or office Mr. Williams was willing 
to do his duty as a citizen, and he was some 
years a member of the school board of Pine 
township, serving several years as president 
of that body. 

On Dec. 31, 1861, Mr. Williams was mar- 
ried in Pittsburg to Sarah Jones, who was 
born in that city Aug. 3. 1841, daughter of 
John D. and Jane Jones. Her father was a 
native of South Wales, and after coming to 
America lived in Pittsburg until his removal 
to Indiana county, where he bought land and 
engaged in farming until his death. He had a 
family of six children, of whom Sarah (Mrs. 
Williams) and Jane (wife of David Oldham 
of Beaver City, Pa.) are now the only sur- 
vivors. 

Nine children were bom to Mr. and Mrs. 
Williams: Elizabeth, wife of Arthur Jones, 
of Barnesboro, Pa., has one child, Ethel ; John 



J., who lives in this county, married Eliza- 
beth Martin, daughter of John Martin, of In- 
diana county, and they have four children, 
John M., William Hay, Sarah J. and George 
M.; Mollie is the wife of G. M. Joiner, of 
Grisemore; Richard is mentioned below; 
Jane, William W. and Margaret are at home ; 
Emma died when seventeen years old ; Mariam 
died in infancy. Mr. Williams was a member 
of the Nebo Presbyterian Church at Grise- 
more, to which his wife also belongs, and 
helped to build the present edifice; he was 
serving as elder at the time of his death. 

Richard Williams was born Sept. 25, 1868, 
in Pine township, this county, and there 
spent his boyhood on the farm, assisting his 
father with the agricultural work and lumber- 
ing, as well as in the mill. In 1897 he moved 
to Grisemore, and here he has carried on gen- 
eral farming, having 110 acres. He is one of 
the most highly respected citizens of the 
neighborhood. 

On Dec. 24, 1896, Mr. Williams was mar- 
ried to Mary Florence Bennett, a native of 
Pine township, and they have had two daugh- 
ters, Emma Mae and Mary Wilda. Mr. and 
Mrs. Williams are prominent membere of the 
Nebo Presbyterian Church at Grisemore, and 
he is serving at present as trustee of the 
church and superintendent of the Sunday 
school. He also takes considerable interest in 
public matters of local importance, and is a 
member of the present board of school direc- 
tors of Green township. In politics he is a 
Prohibitionist. 

John Bennett, Mrs. Williams's paternal 
great-grandfather, was a native of London, 
England. His son Michael Bennett, grand- 
father of Mrs. Williams, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania and was an early settler in Indiana 
county, making a location in Buffington town- 
ship, where he remained until his death. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Strong, was 
of German ancestry. Of their sons. Abraham, 
Peter and William served in the Civil war; 
William, a resident of Clearfield county. Pa., 
and George, of Johnstown, Pa., are now the 
onlv survivors. 

Jacob S. Bennett, father of Mrs. Williams, 
was born Nov. 29, 1838, in Indiana county, 
and was engaged in farming and lumbering 
here, also conducting a hotel in Vintondale 
for some time ; at the time of his death he was 
operating a flourmill known as the Wliite Mill, 
in Cambria county, having been thus engaged 
three years. Mr. Bennett was twice married, 
his first wife, Evannah (Adams), being the 
mother of five children: Franklin, Amanda, 



992 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Emily, Daniel and William. His second wife, 
Rebecca (Downing), was born Feb. 14, 1840, 
in Blair count.y. Pa., where the marriage took 
place, the couple coming at once to Indiana 
county, where they made their home in Pine 
township. Her father, James Downing, was 
born in Blair county. Pa., and was of Irish 
descent. His wife was a daughter of Chris- 
topher Rhodes, a native of Germany, who 
came to America when twelve years old with 
ten other members of the family, was mar- 
ried in Northumberland county. Pa., and was 
the father of ten children. He was a farmer. 
In his later years he lived in Blair county, and 
at the time of his death was a resident of Mor- 
risons Cove, that county. He lived to an ad- 
vanced age. 

By his second marriage Jacob S. Bennett 
had four children. He died Jan. 16, 1907, his 
wife Rebecca passing away Feb. 7, 1912. 
Of his nine children, Franklin lives in Cam- 
bria county. Pa. ; Amanda is the wife of Hugh 
Marsh, of Cambria county ; Emily is the wife 
of Emanuel Stiles, of Cambria count.y; Wil- 
liam S. died Feb. 4, 1912 ; Mary Florence is 
the wife of Richard Williams; Martha is 
the wife of Frederick Roehm, a resident of Du- 
Bois, Pa. ; Joseph Downing lives at Vinton- 
dale; Dora ]\Iay is the wife of W. S. Griffith, 
a resident of Lucerne, in Center township. 

ELSWORTH BROWN CAMPBELL, mer- 
chant of Indiana borough and also interested 
in other local enterprises, has been a resident 
of that place since 1903 and actively asso- 
ciated with its biisiness life since that tim.e. 
He was born Dee. 18, 1861, in Jefferson 
county. Pa., son of James T. and Joannie 
(Shields) Campbell, both natives of Pennsyl- 
vania, and of Scotch-Irish and German parent- 
age, respectively. Hugh Campbell, the gi-and- 
father, was born in Scotland, and came to the 
United States when a young man. 

James T. Campbell was a painter by trade. 
In 1861 he enlisted at Brookville, Pa., for 
sei'vice in the Civil war, remaining in the 
army almost four years and taking part in 
many of the hard-fought battles of the war. 
He had the good fortune never to be wounded 
or captured. After the close of the war he 
returned home and resumed work at his trade. 
He married Joannie Shields, whose father, 
John B. Shields, was bora in the North of 
Ireland and came to the I^'nited States in 
young manhood, locating in Jefferson county, 
Pa., where he followed farming. Mr. Shields 
was a member of the Presbyterian Church. 
He married Catherine Edmonds, and they 



had children as follows: John, Thomas, Al- 
vin, Joana, Abigail and Sarah, and two that 
died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell were 
Ihe parents of five children, namely: Elsworth 
B. ; ilinerva Catharine ; Charles 0. ; John L., 
and Mamie, wife of Charles Clark. The par- 
ents were members of the M. E. Church, and 
Mr. Campbell belonged to the G. A. R. 

Elsworth B. Campbell attended public 
school in his native county and later went to 
liusiness college at Bradford, Pa. But he 
had to rely on his own resources from an 
early age, and when a lad of fifteen went to 
Brookville to work. Wliatever schooling he 
received afterward was obtained by economy 
and his ovm efforts. For six years he worked 
in the sawmill of E. B. Cartwright & Co., 
during the last three years of that period be- 
ing foreman. He then became filer of the 
gang saws, being thus employed for one year. 
The next two years he was engaged in cutting 
lumber on contract for Robert Hamilton. He 
then bought a piece of land and did contract- 
ing of various kinds, also engaging in the 
general mercantile business, and continued in 
this way for about ten years. In April, 1903. 
he moved to the borough of Indiana, where 
he has since carried on his business activities. 
For one year he was in the real estate and 
lumber business, in whicli he had an exten- 
sive patronage. Then he embarked in the re- 
tail coal business, also dealing in sand and 
brick, and he has built up a flourishing cus- 
tom in these lines. For eleven years he had a 
general store at Eleanor, Jefferson coiinty, 
and for four years was in that business at 
Indiana, and he is recognized as one of the 
progressive merchants of the locality, one who 
can be depended upon to give satisfaction in 
the commodities he handles and his methods 
of transacting business. In 1907 Mr. Camp- 
bell bought the old IMorehead farm adjacent 
to and west of Indiana borough, one of the 
oldest farm properties in the county. The 
house on this tract, an old stone fort, will be 
specially referred to in the general history, 
and is about one hundred and twenty years 
old: the pioneers at one time took shelter in 
it when fighting the Indians which molested 
the settlers at the early day when it was first 
occupied. Much of this farm, being low, was 
swampy when ]\Ir. Campbell took possession, 
but bA- drainage and judicioiis improving he 
has brought it into a valuable state of culti- 
vation, and it is now one of the most desir- 
able farm holdings in the county. IMr. Camp- 
bell has become financially interested in sev- 
eral important business concerns in Indiana. 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



993 



among other things being a stockholder in 
the Citizens' National Bank, which he serves 
as director. He is regarded as one of the 
substantial men of the borough, one who can 
be depended upon to advance her prosperity 
by every commendable means. He is well 
known in local fraternal bodies, being a mem- 
ber of the B. P. 0. Elks, I. 0. 0. F., 
Knights of Pythias and Sons of Veterans. In 
religious connection he belongs to the Presby- 
terian Church. 

In 1893 Mr. Campbell married Anna Reed, 
daughter of Jacob Reed, and they have two 
children, J. Elsworth and L. DeLoss. 

JAMES GABLE FLEMING, who is par- 
ticularly well known in Indiana as the pro- 
moter of the south extension of that borough, 
known as the Fleming extension, is develop- 
ing one of the prosperous residence sections 
of this place. Formerly he was for some years 
a merchant of Indiana, and in every business 
association he has made a name for honorable 
dealing and reliability which reflects credit 
upon his character and methods. He is a na- 
tive of Armstrong county, Pa., born in 1837 
at Woodard's Mill, son of James and May 
Fleming. 

Thomas Fleming, his grandfather, was born 
in Huntingdon county, this State, and his 
wife, Bettie (Marton), was a native of Ire- 
land, coming to the United States with her 
parents when a little girl. Mr. and IMrs. 
Thomas Fleming were both of Scotch-Irish 
parentage. In 1818 he settled in Indiana 
county. He was a farmer by occupation. 

James Fleming, son of Thomas, was born 
in Huntingdon county and lived in Indiana 
county among the early settlers. He was a 
machinist by trade, engaged in farming to 
some extent, and was also in the flourmilling 
business, being a part owner of the first flour- 
mill in Armstrong coimty. During the for- 
ties he was a member of the Pennsylvania 
militia. His children were : Elizabeth A., 
wife of David Hill; John; Thomas; James 
Gable ; William ; May A., wife of Israel 
Thomas ; and Charlotte, wife of George Cline. 
The father of this family died in 1891, the 
mother surviving until 1902 ; she was ninety- 
two years old. They were members of the 
Presbyterian Church. 

James Gable Fleming obtained his early 
education in the public schools, later becoming 
a pupil at the Indiana academy and the Glade 
Run academy. For about six years he taught 
school, being engaged in Indiana. Armstrong 
and Westmoreland counties. Meantime he 



had commenced farming on his own account, 
and he followed that calling for about thirty 
years. He then went into the mercantile busi- 
ness, at Five Points, Indiana county, con- 
tinuing same about eleven years, when he sold 
out and took charge of the grocery and shoe 
departments of the Wilson & Sutton estab- 
lishment, in Indiana. Subsequently he opened 
a shoe store of his own in the borough, being 
associated in this enterprise with Israel 
Thomas under the firm name of Fleming & 
Thomas, retaining his interest in this business 
for about ten years. After that for some 
time he was occupied in looking after his 
farm, which is in Armstrong township, Indi- 
ana county, and is the old Fleming homestead 
owned by the family since the days of the 
early settlement in this county, in 1818. In 
company with H. M. Lowry, Mr. Fleming pur- 
chased the eighty acres of land now known 
as the south extension of Indiana borough, 
and they have opened streets and laid it out 
in lots, developing a residence section which 
promises to become one of the most popular 
in the borough. 

Some years ago Mr. Fleming was appointed 
justice of the peace by Governor Stewart, to 
fill a vacancy, and in 1908 he was elected to 
that office, which he is now holding. Some 
idea of his personal standing may be gained 
from the fact that he is the only Democrat 
in Indiana borough holding the office or hav- 
ing held that of justice of the peace. During 
Morgan's raid he served as a member of the 
State militia. He is a prominent member of 
the Presbyterian Church, in which he has been 
ruling elder for over twenty years. 

On May 9, 1865, Mr. Fleming married Har- 
riet Bowman, of Westmoreland county. Pa., 
and they have had three children: jannett 
Alice, Mary Bell, and J. D. 

ROBERT F. FLEMING, carpenter and 
contractor, at present serving as auditor of 
Green township, has been a resident of Star- 
ford for several years past and is one of the 
best known citizens of his section of Indiana 
county. Born in Green township Oct. 15, 
1853, he is a son of Francis J. and Christiana 
(Haley) Fleming, and grandson of Robert 
Fleming, a native of Scotland. Robert Flem- 
ing settled in Allegheny county. Pa., when he 
came to this country, and remained there un- 
til his death. His family consisted of five 
children : Bartholomew, William, Francis J., 
Elizabeth and Mary, all deceased. 

Francis J. Fleming was born Aug. 22, 1811, 
in Allegheny county. Pa., and came to Indi- 



994 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



ana county at an early day. He settled in 
Green township, near Cookport, about 1839, 
bought land and carried on farming in that 
vicinit}', living on what came to be known as 
the old Fleming farm near Cookport, where 
he remained until his death, Aug. 25, 1871. 
He married Christiana Haley, a native of Ire- 
land, born Aug. 22, 1814, who came to America 
when seven years old with her parents, 
Thomas H. and Christiana Haley, the family 
settling in Pittsburg, where Mr. Haley passed 
the remainder of his life. His family con- 
sisted 'of nine children, three sons and six 
daughters, all now deceased, namely: Wil- 
liam, Patience, George, Mary, Jane, Christi- 
ana (Mrs. Fleming), Emma, Elizabeth and 
Thomas. Mrs. Christiana (Haley) Fleming 
died J\Iarch 27, 1889. She and her husband 
had a family of eleven children, viz. : One 
that died in infancy ; George H., deceased, 
who was a soldier in the Civil wai-, enlisting 
from Indiana county (he is mentioned else- 
where in this work) ; Bartholomew, deceased, 
who was also in the Union service during the 
Civil war; i\Iargaret, deceased, who was the 
wife of William H. Munshower, of Lovejoy, 
justice of the peace: Thomas H., deceased; 
Jane Zidana, wife of George Lutman, of Green 
township ; James, deceased ; William I., a resi- 
dent of Indiana county: one that died in 
infancy ; Robert F. ; and Maiy Elizabeth. 

Robert F. Fleming was educated in the 
public schools of Green township, passing his 
boyhood days on the old home farm, where 
he continued to live until after the death of 
his mother. He then sold his interest in the 
propertj' and went to learn the trade of car- 
penter, which he has ever since followed, now 
doing general contract work. In 190.5 he 
moved to Starford, building the home which 
he occupies there, owning that as well as other 
property. He has succeeded in his business 
undertakings, and has gained the confidence 
of his fellow citizens to such an extent that 
he has been chosen to various local offices of 
trust, having been school director three years, 
and at present serving as auditor. He was 
elected on the Republican ticket. 

MILTON G. MILLER, wholesale and retail 
druggist of Blairsville, was born at Dayton, 
Armstrong Co.. Pa.. June 16. 1856. a son of 
Samuel G. and Mar\^ Ann ('Keener") Miller, 
natives of Westmoreland and Indiana coun- 
ties, respectively. His paternal grandfather, 
who was an Irishman bv birth, came to Amer- 



ica in young manhood and located in West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania. 

Samuel G. Miller, son of the immigrant Mil- 
ler, and father of ]\Iiltbn G. ^liller, spent the 
greater part of his life in Conemaugh town- 
ship, this county, and died there in 1880 ; his 
wife died in 1879. He was prominent as a 
debater, and took a very active part in the 
Presbyterian Church both as a member and 
elder for forty years, and was sent as a dele- 
gate to the presbyteiy upon several occasions. 
The children born to Samuel G. Miller and 
wife were: Elizabeth C. Reed, of Indiana 
county; Dr. S. G., of Livermore, Pa.; T. S., 
of Lewisville, Pa.: Dr. M. W., of Pittsburg; 
Robert N., of Indiana, Pa. ; Dr. J. A., who 
died at Santa Fe, N, M,, in June, 1912 ; Milton 
G. ; John K., who died in Blairsville in 1910; 
Margaret D. McComb of Lewisville, who died 
in 1912 ; I\Iary Ann Shields, who died several 
years ago; and Sarah J. Marshall, who died 
some years ago. 

ililton G. ililler was educated in the public 
schools, of Indiana county, Eldersridge acad- 
emy, and the Indiana State normal school, 
and for ten years following the period of his 
study he taught school. Later he embarked 
in a general store business at Blairsville, op- 
erating it for a year, and then in 1881 pur- 
chased the diiig business owned by J. C. Les- 
lie. At that time it was a small concern, but 
Mr. Miller began to enlarge it, and moved to 
his present more commodious quarters. In 
1896 he branched out, becoming a wholesale 
as well as retail druggist, being the only 
wholesale dealer in his line in the country. 
Beginning with the small capital of $400. he 
has become one of the leading business men 
of Blairsville, and fully deserves his success. 

]\Ir. ]\Iiller belongs to the Methodist Church, 
in whose work he is active, and also holds mem- 
bership in the Brotherhood, serving that body 
one year as president. Fraternally he is a 
member of the Royal Arcanum. 

On Jan. 1, 1890. Sir. IMiller was married to 
Ella George, a daughter of Isaac and Anna 
George, of Beatty station. Pa., who died March 
2. 1900. She was the mother of these children : 
Mary Glenn, who was graduated from Wilson 
College in 1913: Mabel Ruth, who is a stu- 
dent in the same college : and Isaac George, 
deceased. 

On June 14. 1911. Mr, Miller was married 
to Dawn Fray of Newark, New Jersey. 

Mr. IMiller is a public speaker and his ad- 
dress to the Old Boatmen, a few years since, 
was regarded as a masterly effort. He has 
held the office of school director and during 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



995 



his term of office has filled the positions of 
president and secretary of the board. He has 
been a member of the Blairsville council and 
has been president of that body. 

JOHN NELSON ARNOLD, of Conemaugh 
township, has farming interests there and in 
Young township, is engaged in mining and 
handling coal, and is of the best known resi- 
dents of his section of Indiana county. He 
was bom Aug. 10, 1860, in Kiskiminetas, Arm- 
strong Co., Pa., son of Robert and grandson 
of William Arnold. The grandfather was 
born and raised in Plymouth, Devonshire, 
England, and passed all his life in his na- 
tive country. He was engaged in the hard- 
ware business. He married Maria Jeffery, and 
they had children as follows: William: Ed- 
ward H. ; Robert ; and Amy Rosina, who mar- 
ried William Henna Spry. 

Robert Arnold, father of John Nelson Ar- 
nold, was born Oct. 24, 182.3, in Plymouth, 
Devonshire, England, where he grew to man- 
hood, coming to America in 1848 in company 
with his brothers William and Edward. By 
trade he was a tinner. His first location was 
in Pittsburg, Pa., where he remained one 
year, thence moving to Maysville, Armstrong 
county, where he lived for six years; to Oli- 
vet, Armstrong county, where he remained 
eight years; to Burrell township, Armstrong 
county, where he made his home four years ; 
and in 1868 to Young township, Indiana coun- 
ty, where he followed his trade in connection 
with farming until his retirement, in 1900. 
That year he removed to Conemaugh town- 
ship, this county, where he died May 11, 1905, 
in his eighty-second year; he was buried in 
Edgewood cemetery, Saltsburg, Pa. He was 
a member of the Jacksonville United Presby- 
terian Church. One of Mr. Arnold's prized 
possessions was a box made by his great -great- 
grandfather, to hold guinea scales, in the con- 
struction of which wire was used instead of 
nails. A dog which he had trained to furnish 
the motive power for a churn attracted con- 
siderable interest in the neighborhood. 

In 1850 Mr. Arnold married Mary Shirley, 
daughter of Joseph and Catherine (Fulmer) 
Shirley, born Oct. 22, 1828, died Oct. 7, 1906. 
They became the parents of eight children, 
viz. : Maria C. married R. C. Millen, who died 
in 1908 ; he was a soldier in the Civil war, and 
afterward farmed in Conemaugh township. 
Joseph Ralston died when nine years old. 
George Wilson lives in Girard, Ohio, where 
he follows the business of machinist ; he mar- 
ried Rachel Richardson. James H., a ma- 



chinist in the employ of the Pittsburg Steel 
Company, married Carrie Kepple. Emma 
B. married Thomas Smith and resides in Salts- 
burg. John Nelson is mentioned below. Flora 
Adeline married John A. Knepshiel and 
(second) H. S. Oakman, and resides in -Clar- 
ion county. Pa. Jacob Samuel Telford, a 
farmer and machinist, now residing at Mount 
Sterling, Ky., married Mary Gowns. 

John Nelson Arnold attended common 
school in Young township, later went to the 
Eldersridge academy for a term, and then fol- 
lowed farming with his father, with whom he 
remained until 1894. In that year he moved 
to Conemaugh township and settled on his 
present place, which is a farm of forty-eight 
acres owned by his wife, her father having 
willed it to her. Besides looking after the 
agricultural work on this tract he owns and 
conducts a 156-acre farm in Young township, 
and he owns 200 acres of coal land in that 
township. He works the coal mine located 
near his home owned by Mrs. Arnold, this 
deposit being known as the Pittsburg vein, 
and supplied the rolling mill in the vicinity 
until it was closed. He now conducts what is 
known as the "farmers' coal band," disposing 
of over fifteen thousand bushels during the 
season ; the customers call for it. 

Mr. Arnold has been very active in local 
public affairs, being tax collector at present — 
an . office he has held since 1909 ; he has also 
served as roadmaster and member of the elec- 
tion board. Politically he associates with the 
Democratic party. He is a member and rul- 
ing elder of the United Presbyterian Church 
at Saltsburg, his wife and son also belonging. 

On Feb. 21, 1894, Mr. Arnold was mar- 
ried to Mrs. Martha B. (Nowry) Wiley, 
daughter of Samuel H. and Elizabeth (Craw- 
ford) Nowry and widow of John Luther 
Wiley. By her first marriage Mrs. Arnold 
had one daughter, Sadie May, who is now the 
wife of Charles Orvis Lamer and resides in 
Lorain, Ohio, where her husband is an electri- 
cian in the employ of the United States Steel 
Company. Mr. and Mrs. Arnold have had one 
child, Carl L., born May 1, 1895, who is now a 
student at the Kiskiminetas Springs School, 
at Saltsburg, Indiana coimty, a well-known 
institution for boys, being a member of the 
class of 1914; after graduating there he in- 
tends to enter Princeton. 

SAMUEL H. NOWRY, deceased, eldest 
son of James and Mary (Marshall) Nowry, 
pioneer settlers on Blacklegs creek, Cone- 
maugh township, was born May 3, 1812. He 



996 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



received his education in the public schools 
of said township, and under private tutors. 
At the age of eighteen he taught his first 
school, in a primitive schoolhouse located near 
the election house at the junction of Scrub- 
grass run and Blacklegs creek, after which 
school term he remained at home with 
his father for a period of three years, 
, helping to prepare the brick and erect the 
present brick homestead, now known as the 
old Nowry homestead, on the State road. All 
the while he was studying for his much loved 
vocation, that of a teacher in the public 
school. He began teaching again at the age 
of twenty-two, and taught twent.y years with- 
out intermission. In the meantime he had 
saved enough money from his scanty wages 
as a teacher to purchase the farm in Cone- 
maugh township on which Nowry town is now 
located. He then retired from his chosen pro- 
fession and took up farm life in addition to 
participating in local politics, being a stanch 
Democrat. He was a township officer almost 
continuously for ten years. Being a firm be- 
liever in the axiom that "the only sure invest- 
ment on earth is in earth, ' ' he purchased two 
additional farms in Conemaugh township, the 
one known as the Walkinshaw farm and later 
part of the D. S. Galley homestead, the other 
known as the Lyons farm, now owned by Wil- 
liam Schmidt. Having now arrived at the age 
of fifty, and believing he had the wherewithal 
to furnish a home and rear a famil.v, he hied 
himself to an adjoining county and formed 
an alliance with a daughter of a pioneer set- 
tler of Armstrong eounty, William Crawford, 
of near Olivet. Samuel H. Nowry and Eliza- 
beth Crawford were married by Rev. Alex- 
ander Donnelson, IMarch 26, 1862, and went to 
housekeeping on the farm on which Nowry- 
town is located. There were three children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Nowry, one son and two 
daughters: Albert and Martha B.. twins, 
born May 18, 1864, and Rebecca M., born June 
8. 1866. Albert Nowry, son of Samuel, still 
resides on a part of tlie old homestead, and 
has a family of seven children. Martha B., 
married to John N. Arnold, is chronicled 
with the Arnold family ; Rebecca M. married 
John C. Lahl, of Lorain, Ohio, and has no 
children. 

In the year Foster coal mines first opened 
when people were coming over from England 
to engage in the mining industry, they being 
of the best class of Christian people and want- 
ing to buy land and erect new homes, Mr. 
Nowry as a public-spirited man volunteered to 
sell fifty acres of his farm in lots to them, that 



they might erect homes and raise their 
families away from the degrading influences 
of the pit mouth. He was rewarded by having 
the settlement named Nowrytown to perpet- 
uate his memory. 

Samuel H. Nowry died June 6, 1887, and 
is interred in Edgewood cemetery at Saltsburg, 
Pennsylvania. His wife, Elizabeth, died April 
4, 1897, and is interred beside her husband. 

ROBERT HAZARD CUNNINGHAM, jus- 
tice of the peace, and a farmer and business 
man of Armstrong township, Indiana county, 
was born in that township Oct. 8. 1851. He is 
a son of John Cunningham and grandson of 
Robert Cunningham, who came to this coun- 
try from Scotland and settled in Young town- 
ship, Indiana Co., Pa. He became a large 
land owner and was extensively engaged in 
stock raising. He and his wife Jane (Hop- 
kins) are buried in the cemetery at Jackson- 
ville. Their children were : Hugh, a farmer, 
who married Martha Hal-t; John; William, 
who was never mai-ried ; Robert, a tanner and 
farmer, who married Eliza Hart ; Ann, wife of 
John Gilmore; Margaret, wife of William 
Gamble; Jane, who married John Lucas, a 
carpenter, of Blacklick, this county; and Re- 
becca, who married Milton Neal. 

John Cunningham, son of Robert, was born 
in 1820 in Scotland, Indiana county. Pa., and 
passed his early life in Young township, at- 
tending the log schoolhouse in the neighbor- 
hood. He learned the trade of carpenter, and 
was especially in demand as a barn builder, in 
which line he became very skillful. He helped 
to build the locks on the old Pennsjdvania 
canal. ]\Ioving to Armstrong township in 
1850 he built a dwelling and tannery (on the 
farm where his son Robert now lives) and was 
an energetic business man up to his death, 
cultivating his farm of 200 acres and follow- 
ing tanning, shipping leather to Philadelphia. 
He also owned a coal bank wliich lie operated, 
and was an all-round enterprising and pro- 
gressive man. He served his to\\-nship in the 
offices of school director, supervisor and as- 
sessor, and was an elder and trustee of the 
United Presbyterian Church, of which he was 
long a devoted member. Politically he was a 
Republican. His death occurred in 1888. Mr. 
Cunningham married Rebecca Beatty. daugh- 
ter of Roliert and Nancy (Borelnnd'i Beatty. 
and ( second ~) Sarah Lucas, who now makes her 
home with his son William. l\Ir. Cunningham 
was the father of children as follows, all bom 
to the first marriage: Robert Hazard; Eliza- 
l>etli, born Sept. 26. 1855, wife of Albert Wig- 



HISTORY OF INDIANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



997 



gins ; "William, bom Dec. 19, 1853, unmarried, 
who is a farmer and owner of coal land in 
Armstrong township ; and Harriet, who died 
when three years old. 

Robert Hazard Cunningham grew to man- 
hood on the home farm and at an early age 
began to assist his father at tanning, and from 
1868 carried on the tanning business himself. 
For a number of years the tanning he did was 
for himself, but he shipped leather to Phila- 
delphia.